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David Goody

Major Heinrich Fritz Buschmann, Luftwaffe, Transportgeschwader

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I am researching this Luftwaffe officer for the granddaughter of Major Buschmann and myself as I grew up with his son’s family. During the last week I have been on the Germany: Imperial: The Orders, Decorations and Medals of the Imperial German States as his granddaughter has some of his World War 1 awards. Most things I know and have learned are on that forum. In summary he served Germany in World War 1 including as a pilot, was in the Freikorps and was called up to serve in the Luftwaffe where he served as a transport aircraft pilot and progressed up the ranks to Major. He was reported as missing in action at the time of the Stalingrad airlift. I have applied to the Department Military Archives Das Bundesarchiv and Deutsche Dienststelle for any records held by these agencies. Would anyone on this forum be able to further assist me please including suggestions on further research that I can conduct?

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David,

I could provide some detail of his WW2 service, from the LW Career Summaries. However, there is no Heinrich Buschmann, but there is a Fritz. Could that have been his first name?

Kind regards
Pierce

Buschmann1.jpg

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4 hours ago, P.F. said:

David,

I could provide some detail of his WW2 service, from the LW Career Summaries. However, there is no Heinrich Buschmann, but there is a Fritz. Could that have been his first name?

Kind regards
Pierce

Buschmann1.jpg

Hello Pierce

Thank you very much for your research & suggestion. I don’t think this is the officer I am researching but I can’t rule it out. My interpretation of this officer’s service indicates he was assigned to a Luftwaffe Field Corps, whereas Heinrich was a transport pilot. It seems to be a waste of talent to transfer a pilot to a field unit. Then again perhaps it was a punishment. He was very critical of Hitler. His granddaughter recently told me a story that her father Dieter won a ski award presumably in the HJ. It was either presented by Hitler or signed in his name. When his father Heinrich was home on leave he tore it up and threw it at Dieter. I am hopeful my search requests with the Bundesarchiv and WASt will provide me with further information & I will keep these forums updated. Again, many thanks. David

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1 hour ago, J Temple-West said:

David, do you have a date of birth for Heinrich?

Hello John

4 October, unfortunately the granddaughter does not know the year. Considering he served in World War 1 I would think around the mid 1890s.

Kind regards

David

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So, let us say 1895... that would put him over the top for operational flying duties.

I think you'll find that he was probably an instructor at one of the Luftwaffe flying schools, as so many WW1 flying veterans were.

 

 

When the planning for the Stalingrad airlift was taking place (which turned out to be an absolute catastrophe, and in effect began the demise of the Luftwaffe and the end of Germany's war), it was estimated that to sustain a fighting force of 250,000 men would need air drops of between six hundred and 750 tons per day. The Sixth Army’s supply requirements were initially established at 750 tons per day, but later reduced to five hundred tons per day. The required aircraft and crews for the Stalingrad airlift assembled on short notice from the advanced flight training school. Sending many of the Luftwaffe’s most experienced instructor-pilots contributed to degradation in the quality of new pilots being trained. Every single available aircraft mobilized for the Stalingrad airlift.

On 23 November 1942, Lieutenant General Hans-Georg von Seidel, the Quartermaster General of the Luftwaffe, ordered all Ju-52s (transport aircraft); Ju-86s (trainer; completely inappropriate as a transport); FW-200s and Ju-90s (long-range reconnaissance aircraft); He-111s (long-range bomber), from every unit, staff, ministry, and the Office of the Chief of Training. Six hundred aircraft along with some of the best flight instructors were stripped away from the training facilities. Specialized training schools were closed due to the ruthless efforts taken to ensure the success of the airlift. By early December Fourth  Air Fleet had approximately five hundred aircraft at their disposal, with more becoming available as the operations progressed. Germany’s top military leaders were convinced that the number of aircraft now dedicated to the operations was sufficient to meet the logistical needs of the Sixth Army….how wrong they were.

 

The airlift fleet was based at Tatsinskaya and I think you will find that this was where he will have been based until the end.

 

As to the German archives…vast amounts of period records/documents were destroyed during, and after the war. If Major Heinrich Fritz Buschmann does not appear on the lists available to historians (such as the ones cited) then I think that they will have been lost….but let us keep our fingers crossed.

Please let us know how you get on.

 

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Very interesting project. I look forward to seeing what you come up with.  You will need to find out basic information, such as DOB.  It will help out a lot. 

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4 hours ago, J Temple-West said:

So, let us say 1895... that would put him over the top for operational flying duties.

I think you'll find that he was probably an instructor at one of the Luftwaffe flying schools, as so many WW1 flying veterans were.

 

 

When the planning for the Stalingrad airlift was taking place (which turned out to be an absolute catastrophe, and in effect began the demise of the Luftwaffe and the end of Germany's war), it was estimated that to sustain a fighting force of 250,000 men would need air drops of between six hundred and 750 tons per day. The Sixth Army’s supply requirements were initially established at 750 tons per day, but later reduced to five hundred tons per day. The required aircraft and crews for the Stalingrad airlift assembled on short notice from the advanced flight training school. Sending many of the Luftwaffe’s most experienced instructor-pilots contributed to degradation in the quality of new pilots being trained. Every single available aircraft mobilized for the Stalingrad airlift.

On 23 November 1942, Lieutenant General Hans-Georg von Seidel, the Quartermaster General of the Luftwaffe, ordered all Ju-52s (transport aircraft); Ju-86s (trainer; completely inappropriate as a transport); FW-200s and Ju-90s (long-range reconnaissance aircraft); He-111s (long-range bomber), from every unit, staff, ministry, and the Office of the Chief of Training. Six hundred aircraft along with some of the best flight instructors were stripped away from the training facilities. Specialized training schools were closed due to the ruthless efforts taken to ensure the success of the airlift. By early December Fourth  Air Fleet had approximately five hundred aircraft at their disposal, with more becoming available as the operations progressed. Germany’s top military leaders were convinced that the number of aircraft now dedicated to the operations was sufficient to meet the logistical needs of the Sixth Army….how wrong they were.

 

The airlift fleet was based at Tatsinskaya and I think you will find that this was where he will have been based until the end.

 

As to the German archives…vast amounts of period records/documents were destroyed during, and after the war. If Major Heinrich Fritz Buschmann does not appear on the lists available to historians (such as the ones cited) then I think that they will have been lost….but let us keep our fingers crossed.

Please let us know how you get on.

 

Thank you very much John for your advice & insight. I am optimistic I will learn more & will update the forums as that occurs.

Kind regards

David

4 hours ago, Paul R said:

Very interesting project. I look forward to seeing what you come up with.  You will need to find out basic information, such as DOB.  It will help out a lot. 

Thank you Paul. I know the son Dieter was born in Lübeck in 1929, so will ask the granddaughter to authorise a birth certificate search which I see can be done on line through the German government. If the certificate is there it should give me a birth year or age at Dieter’s birth of Heinrich Buschmann.

Dieter worked for the U.S. occupation forces in Bavaria after the war (he & his mother were evacuated to live there with relatives after their Berlin home was destroyed). Do you have any thoughts please whether U.S. archives would hold any records on Dieter that may give clues about his father?

Kind regards

David

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I think that since he worked with the US for a bit, there is a good chance there may be something in US Archives. 

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Pierce was right. I have received records from the Bundesarchiv, Department Military Archives. They have him recorded as Hptm. d.R.z. V. Fritz Buschmann, date of birth 4.10.1891. I am translating the records consisting of 10 pages which deal with him being trained as a battalion leader in the 9. Luftwaffe-Felddivision in 1943. I am totally surprised that the Luftwaffe would transfer a pilot to an infantry unit.

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On 02/12/2018 at 18:01, David Goody said:

Pierce was right. I have received records from the Bundesarchiv, Department Military Archives. They have him recorded as Hptm. d.R.z. V. Fritz Buschmann, date of birth 4.10.1891. I am translating the records consisting of 10 pages which deal with him being trained as a battalion leader in the 9. Luftwaffe-Felddivision in 1943. I am totally surprised that the Luftwaffe would transfer a pilot to an infantry unit.

 

Wow.  He must've screwed up big-time to be sent to a LWFD at his age and lack of infantry experience.  I doubt he would've been immediately put in charge of a Battalion like that, would he?  Was he demoted?  Are his officer evaluations included in those documents?

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3 hours ago, Paul R said:

 

Wow.  He must've screwed up big-time to be sent to a LWFD at his age and lack of infantry experience.  I doubt he would've been immediately put in charge of a Battalion like that, would he?  Was he demoted?  Are his officer evaluations included in those documents? 

Not so much as a demotion, but more like a use of experienced staff officers in the formation of units in a desperate attempt to get boots on the ground.

As with the formation of the transport units in the Stalingrad airlift, staff officers from Luftwaffe training schools were also used to form ground units and now that we have confirmation of Buschmann’s unit we can trace him back to being involved in the Luftwaffe training programme.

 

 

Flieger-Ausbildungs-Regiment 62

 

 

Kommandeure:

•Oberst Heinz Funke, 1.4.39 - 1.2.40

•Oberst Joachim Sperling, 1.2.40 - 31.10.40

•Oberst Ehrenfried Tschoeltsch, 1.11.40 - 14.1.41

•Oberst Hermann Muggenthaler, 15.1.41 - 5.10.42

 

Formed 1.4.39 in Quedlinburg from Flieger-Ersatz-Abteilung62 with:

•Stab

•I. Ausbildungs-Bataillon from Flieger-Ersatz-Abteilung62

•Flugzeugführerschule (Schule/FAR.62) from FFS A/B Quedlinburg

 

II. Ausbildungs-Bataillon was formed in 1940, while the Schule/FAR.62left the regiment 16.10.41, and became FFS A/B62.

 

Moved to Baden bei Wien (5.40), and Blois (1942).

 

On 16.8.42 redesignated Flieger-Regiment 62.

 

In 10.42 renamed Luftwaffen-Feld-Division 9.

 

Organisation:

 

 

1939/40: Stab, I. (1-5), 6., 7., Schule

1941/42: Stab, I. (1-5), 7., II. (8-12)

 

 

 

 

 

Luftwaffen-Feld-Division 9

 

The 9th Luftwaffe Field Division (German: 9.Luftwaffen-Feld-Division) was an infantry division of the Luftwaffe branch of the Wehrmacht that fought in World War II. It was formed using surplus ground crew of the Luftwaffe and served on the Eastern Front from late 1942 to June 1944. It was badly mauled during the Soviet offensive of January 1944 near Leningrad. It was later merged with the 225th Infantry Division

 

Kommandeure:

 

•Oberst Hans Erdmann, 8.10.42 - 11.8.43

•GenMaj Anton-Carl Longin, 11.8.43 - 1.11.43

 

Ia:

•Maj Egeler, 4.10.42 - 1.11.43

 

Formed 10.42 at Arys from Flieger-Regiment 62.

 

The division consisted of:

•Luftwaffen-Jäger-Regiment 17

•Luftwaffen-Jäger-Regiment 18

•Panzer-Jäger-Abteilung Luftwaffen-Feld-Division 9

•Luftwaffen-Artillerie-Regiment 9

•Pionier-Kompanie Luftwaffen-Feld-Division 9

•Luftnachrichten-Kompanie Luftwaffen-Feld-Division 9

•Kommandeur der Nachschubtruppen Luftwaffen-Feld-Division 9

 

Taken over by the Army on 1.11.43 as 9. Feld-Division (L)

 

The division served under the following headquarters:

 

 

12.42 - 1.43 L.AK / AOK.18 Oranienbaum

2.43 - 10.43 III. LwAK / AOK.18 Oranienbaum

 

 

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I apologise for the late response, I have been using Google Translate & various on line German military abbreviation lists to translate as best I can the 10 pages from the Bundesarchiv, Department Military archives. All the documents are from 4 May to 17 July 1943 and concern his redeployment to the 9 Luftwaffe-Feld Division. Whilst this is a very short snapshot of his military career, it shows that he survived the Stalingrad airlift and his ultimate fate was likely in the Baltic states/ north west Russia area.

Page 1: Bundesarchiv file cover page for Hptm. D. R.z. V. Fritz Buschmann Geb. dat. 4.10.91, Lw.

Page 2: Appears to be a Luftwaffe file front page, no other information other than above.

Page 3: Copy of Battalion Leader School, B Educational Group, 5 Infantry Educational Department Evaluation dated 4.5.1943 on Hauptmann Buschmann. It concerns his participation in the battalion leader course from 12.4.43 to 8.5.43. States his unit was Feld Ausb. Regt. 1 (Field Training Regiment 1). His career includes the term R.D.A. (M.Ord.Nr.) 1.1.42.

I. Outer Appearance and Attitude: Great appearance, good attitude, very flexible

II. Rating as a person, troop leader and instructor: Has worked with attention. On a tactical level is missing any basis to build with success on it. Infantry understanding is very low.

III. Final Judgment: Not suitable for battalion leader.

IV. Statement of the Instructor Commander: There is no infantry basis. Troop assessment did not exist.

V. Statement of the Commander of the School: Agreed

Page 4: Evaluation reports cover page dated 10.6.43 from High Commander Field Training Regiment and Training Battalion Luftwaffe, Boelckestr. 12 Braunschweig to The Minister of Aviation and Commander in Chief of the Air Force, Leipziger Str. 7 Berlin. Concerns evaluation notes for officers who took part in the 8th Battalion Leader course in Antwerp. The evaluation reports were for Oberstlt. (Erg.O.) v Hullesheim (Friedrich), Hauptmann (d.R.z.V.) Buschmann (Fritz), Hauptmann (d.R.) Gribl (Wilhelm)

Page 5 & 6: Original evaluation at Page 3 signed Lieutenant Colonel and Head of the Education Department, and by Lieutenant Colonel Training Commander, and by Colonel and Commander.

Page 7: War assessments cover page dated 27.7.1943 to the 1.8.1943 over officers of the Reserve Luftwaffe Field Units. From Air Fleet Command 1 to the Minister of Aviation and Commander in Chief of the Air Force. The attached war evaluations about the following officers of the Luftwaffe Field Units for submission. Hptm. Buschmann, Fritz 9. Lw.Feld-Div., Hptm. Drobek, Richard 10. Lw. Feld.Div., Hptm. Hoffmann, Friedrich 9. Lw. Feld-Div., Hptm. Wilde v. Wildemann, Lothar A.R. 9 (L).

Signed Lieutenant Colonel for the Air Fleet Command The Chief of the General Staff.

Page 8 & 9: War assessment to the 1.8.43 dated 6 July 1943 from the 9. Luftwaffen-Felddivision, Divisional Command Post for Hauptmann (d.R.z.V.) Fritz Buschmann, married, civil profession businessman, able bodied for war. Since 10.5.43 admission as Divisional Supply Leader, Konigsberg/Nm. Berlin VIII.

Short Assessment: Decent character, ambitious, restraint in some situations is the case. He is a National Socialist and passes on this thought. He had no opportunity to be saved from the enemy. He had worked with great interest in the tasks of the unit, it is expected he will fill this post later. He is averagely gifted and physically capable. He could not acquire infantry experience here. He is suitable as the leader of covered columns, because he brings with him the necessary know how.

Summary Judgment: Average.

Signed by Major General and Division Commander, and the Commanding General of the III Luftwaffe Field Corps on 18 July 1943.

Page 10: Addendum to the assessment dated 17.7.43 from 9. Luftwaffen Felddivision for Hauptmann Buschmann. Hauptmann Buschmann as part of the briefing as divisional supply leader also commanded for 8 days. A judgment about his fitness cannot be given after this short time. However it is possible with mental ability that he will prove himself after further instruction.

Signed Colonel and Depury Division Commander.

I trust you find this interesting and welcome any observations from this evidence about the military career of Hauptmann Buschmann. I am still awaiting any records that may be located by Deutsche Dienststelle.

 

 

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It seems likely Fritz Buschmann was reported missing in early 1944 during the Soviet offensive from the Oranienbaum pocket. It also appears he was in the supply arm of the 9 Luftwaffe Field Division. I have been unable to find much on the web about the fate of the division except it was pretty much destroyed in the path of the offensive. Would anybody be able to further enlighten me please on this period of the division’s service, especially the fate of rear echelon division members?

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David,

There are a couple of places in Werner Haupt's book "ARMY GROUP NORTH - THE WEHRMACHT IN RUSSIA 1941-1945" where the 9.Luftwaffe Field Division is mentioned.  On page 198 he says "The front situation at the beginning of 1944 showed the army group to be in the following positions as follows (from left to right)" These positions refer to a map in the book.

"The Orienbaum bridgehead was surrounded by the newly arrived III Panzer Corps.  Here, they had available: SS Police Division, SS "Nordland" Division, and the 10th and 9th Luftwaffe Field Divisions."  On page 203 he says "The Soviets attacked without pause.  The 2nd Shock Army penetrated into the Ropsha area, with the CVIII Rifle Corps, while elements of the 42nd Army occupied Krassnoe Selo.  The pincers appeared to be closing around the 126th ID and the 9th Luftwaffe Field Division."  Later he says "...Colonel Fischer (Commander of the 126TH ID) decided to quickly regroup the division and break out of the encirclement...."  and "The majority of the 126th ID, the 9th Luftwaffe Field Division, and the 530th Naval Artillery Battalion made it through. The heavy weapons, almost all of the horses, and all baggage was left behind." 

This was the only mention made in the book, at least in the first half of 1944, of the 9th Luftwaffe Field Division.  While this won't help much in your research it does confirm location the position of the unit of concern in January of 1944.  The III Panzer Corps is mentioned latter in 1944 in action in this part of Russia but no mention of the composition of the corps.

One suggestion I would like to make is that you ask your questions on the WAF if you haven't already done so.  They have a sub forum for research on individuals in the Wehrmacht and there might be some useful info there.

Regards,

Gordon

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Goerings Grenadiers by Antonio Munoz covers all the LW Feld-Division histories with about 3 pages covering the period you seek and trying to uncover the confusion about what survived and where they were assigned.

It would seem that the Russians were aware of the poor combat value of the division and planned their offensive to actually target it and the other weak units in the area. During the divisions retreat the Russians sliced through the retreating columns. An Army High Command report for 19th January 1944 stated that communications had been lost with 9.Feld-Division (L) (Mehner: Die Geheimen Tagesberichte Volume 9) with the division having been wiped out on the night of the 19th January north of Krasnoye Selo and Ropscha.

Based on the narrative in that book it would seem that the majority of the survivors came from the rear area troops of the division with survivors eventually being assigned to various other units including 126.Inf.Division. The 9.Feld-Division (L) admin section was absorbed by the newly formed 20.Waffen-Grenadier-Division der SS while a number of truck supply units from the both 9.& 10. Luftwaffe Divisions were absorbed by 3.SS-Panzerkorps, 11.SS-Nordland Division and the SS Nederland Brigade ( NARA - T-311 Roll 72 which has a number of Heeregruppe Nord Ia entries for 14th March, 5th, 10th, 19th & 21st April.)

But as for the combat effectiveness of the division, which was poor to begin with, it effectively ceased to exist after the third week of January 1944.

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