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David Goody

Major Heinrich Fritz Buschmann, Luftwaffe, Transportgeschwader

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I am researching this Luftwaffe officer for the granddaughter of Major Buschmann and myself as I grew up with his son’s family. During the last week I have been on the Germany: Imperial: The Orders, Decorations and Medals of the Imperial German States as his granddaughter has some of his World War 1 awards. Most things I know and have learned are on that forum. In summary he served Germany in World War 1 including as a pilot, was in the Freikorps and was called up to serve in the Luftwaffe where he served as a transport aircraft pilot and progressed up the ranks to Major. He was reported as missing in action at the time of the Stalingrad airlift. I have applied to the Department Military Archives Das Bundesarchiv and Deutsche Dienststelle for any records held by these agencies. Would anyone on this forum be able to further assist me please including suggestions on further research that I can conduct?

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David,

I could provide some detail of his WW2 service, from the LW Career Summaries. However, there is no Heinrich Buschmann, but there is a Fritz. Could that have been his first name?

Kind regards
Pierce

Buschmann1.jpg

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4 hours ago, P.F. said:

David,

I could provide some detail of his WW2 service, from the LW Career Summaries. However, there is no Heinrich Buschmann, but there is a Fritz. Could that have been his first name?

Kind regards
Pierce

Buschmann1.jpg

Hello Pierce

Thank you very much for your research & suggestion. I don’t think this is the officer I am researching but I can’t rule it out. My interpretation of this officer’s service indicates he was assigned to a Luftwaffe Field Corps, whereas Heinrich was a transport pilot. It seems to be a waste of talent to transfer a pilot to a field unit. Then again perhaps it was a punishment. He was very critical of Hitler. His granddaughter recently told me a story that her father Dieter won a ski award presumably in the HJ. It was either presented by Hitler or signed in his name. When his father Heinrich was home on leave he tore it up and threw it at Dieter. I am hopeful my search requests with the Bundesarchiv and WASt will provide me with further information & I will keep these forums updated. Again, many thanks. David

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1 hour ago, J Temple-West said:

David, do you have a date of birth for Heinrich?

Hello John

4 October, unfortunately the granddaughter does not know the year. Considering he served in World War 1 I would think around the mid 1890s.

Kind regards

David

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So, let us say 1895... that would put him over the top for operational flying duties.

I think you'll find that he was probably an instructor at one of the Luftwaffe flying schools, as so many WW1 flying veterans were.

 

 

When the planning for the Stalingrad airlift was taking place (which turned out to be an absolute catastrophe, and in effect began the demise of the Luftwaffe and the end of Germany's war), it was estimated that to sustain a fighting force of 250,000 men would need air drops of between six hundred and 750 tons per day. The Sixth Army’s supply requirements were initially established at 750 tons per day, but later reduced to five hundred tons per day. The required aircraft and crews for the Stalingrad airlift assembled on short notice from the advanced flight training school. Sending many of the Luftwaffe’s most experienced instructor-pilots contributed to degradation in the quality of new pilots being trained. Every single available aircraft mobilized for the Stalingrad airlift.

On 23 November 1942, Lieutenant General Hans-Georg von Seidel, the Quartermaster General of the Luftwaffe, ordered all Ju-52s (transport aircraft); Ju-86s (trainer; completely inappropriate as a transport); FW-200s and Ju-90s (long-range reconnaissance aircraft); He-111s (long-range bomber), from every unit, staff, ministry, and the Office of the Chief of Training. Six hundred aircraft along with some of the best flight instructors were stripped away from the training facilities. Specialized training schools were closed due to the ruthless efforts taken to ensure the success of the airlift. By early December Fourth  Air Fleet had approximately five hundred aircraft at their disposal, with more becoming available as the operations progressed. Germany’s top military leaders were convinced that the number of aircraft now dedicated to the operations was sufficient to meet the logistical needs of the Sixth Army….how wrong they were.

 

The airlift fleet was based at Tatsinskaya and I think you will find that this was where he will have been based until the end.

 

As to the German archives…vast amounts of period records/documents were destroyed during, and after the war. If Major Heinrich Fritz Buschmann does not appear on the lists available to historians (such as the ones cited) then I think that they will have been lost….but let us keep our fingers crossed.

Please let us know how you get on.

 

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Very interesting project. I look forward to seeing what you come up with.  You will need to find out basic information, such as DOB.  It will help out a lot. 

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4 hours ago, J Temple-West said:

So, let us say 1895... that would put him over the top for operational flying duties.

I think you'll find that he was probably an instructor at one of the Luftwaffe flying schools, as so many WW1 flying veterans were.

 

 

When the planning for the Stalingrad airlift was taking place (which turned out to be an absolute catastrophe, and in effect began the demise of the Luftwaffe and the end of Germany's war), it was estimated that to sustain a fighting force of 250,000 men would need air drops of between six hundred and 750 tons per day. The Sixth Army’s supply requirements were initially established at 750 tons per day, but later reduced to five hundred tons per day. The required aircraft and crews for the Stalingrad airlift assembled on short notice from the advanced flight training school. Sending many of the Luftwaffe’s most experienced instructor-pilots contributed to degradation in the quality of new pilots being trained. Every single available aircraft mobilized for the Stalingrad airlift.

On 23 November 1942, Lieutenant General Hans-Georg von Seidel, the Quartermaster General of the Luftwaffe, ordered all Ju-52s (transport aircraft); Ju-86s (trainer; completely inappropriate as a transport); FW-200s and Ju-90s (long-range reconnaissance aircraft); He-111s (long-range bomber), from every unit, staff, ministry, and the Office of the Chief of Training. Six hundred aircraft along with some of the best flight instructors were stripped away from the training facilities. Specialized training schools were closed due to the ruthless efforts taken to ensure the success of the airlift. By early December Fourth  Air Fleet had approximately five hundred aircraft at their disposal, with more becoming available as the operations progressed. Germany’s top military leaders were convinced that the number of aircraft now dedicated to the operations was sufficient to meet the logistical needs of the Sixth Army….how wrong they were.

 

The airlift fleet was based at Tatsinskaya and I think you will find that this was where he will have been based until the end.

 

As to the German archives…vast amounts of period records/documents were destroyed during, and after the war. If Major Heinrich Fritz Buschmann does not appear on the lists available to historians (such as the ones cited) then I think that they will have been lost….but let us keep our fingers crossed.

Please let us know how you get on.

 

Thank you very much John for your advice & insight. I am optimistic I will learn more & will update the forums as that occurs.

Kind regards

David

4 hours ago, Paul R said:

Very interesting project. I look forward to seeing what you come up with.  You will need to find out basic information, such as DOB.  It will help out a lot. 

Thank you Paul. I know the son Dieter was born in Lübeck in 1929, so will ask the granddaughter to authorise a birth certificate search which I see can be done on line through the German government. If the certificate is there it should give me a birth year or age at Dieter’s birth of Heinrich Buschmann.

Dieter worked for the U.S. occupation forces in Bavaria after the war (he & his mother were evacuated to live there with relatives after their Berlin home was destroyed). Do you have any thoughts please whether U.S. archives would hold any records on Dieter that may give clues about his father?

Kind regards

David

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I think that since he worked with the US for a bit, there is a good chance there may be something in US Archives. 

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