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Kev in Deva

DEFENCE FORCE OF IRELAND SERVICE MEDALS.

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Hallo Gentlemen :beer:

I would like to take this moment to post pictures of the service medals I was personaly awarded with for my service with the Irish Defence Forces and the United Nations. My period of service was from 6th May 1976 to the 24th October 1997. In total 21 years and 174 days . Military Conduct Rating: EXEMPLARY. :jumping:

The PERMANENT DEFENCE FORCES SERVICE MEDAL / An Bonn Seirbise. :jumping::jumping:

The long service medal for Non-Commissioned ranks of the regular defence forces was instituted on December 13th, 1944.

It may be awarded after ten years satisfactory service, and a bar may be awarded after a further five years continuous service.

On November 23, 1983 retrospective legislation permitted the medal to be awarded to Officers, Chaplains and members of the Nursing Services for fifteen years service, with a bar for twenty years.

All medals are in a bronze alloy, 35mm in diameter.

Obverse; A symbolic female figure of Eire placing a laurel wreath on the head of a kneeling soldier.

The inscription "AN BONN SEIRBHISE" partly surrounds the form of the soldier, with a small spray of laurel to the right of Eire.

Reverse; Around the top the words "THE SERVICE MEDAL" with particulars of the recipient engraved in the centre, service number, intials, and name.

Officers medals have the letter "O" in front of their number.

Ribbons; The ten years service medal has a 32mm plain Saint Patrick's blue ribbon, while the fifteen year ribbon has a 5mm gold stripe in the centre. This latter ribbon is used on the office's medals as well.

Suspension; Ring and pin back broach with the word "SEIRBIS / SERVICE" in raised letters.

Bar; The bars are sewn to the ribbon and are bronze with two laurel sprays on either side of a central cruciform design.

Designer: D. O. Murchadha.

Manufacturer's; P. Quinn Ltd. and Jewellery and Metal Mfg., Co., Ltd, 17 Wood Street, Dublin 8.

Issues are made half-yearly and presentations are usually made by Commanding Officers at ceremonial parades*. The medal may be awarded posthumously and may be forfeited for certain offences.

There are considerable varities in strikings, as is to be expected in a piece which has been in issue for over 60 years and made by two seperate firms.

*On a visit to my Parent Battalion from the Unit, I had been attached to the Company storeman collared me near the Guardroom, produced a slip of paper and with a quick "Sign there, and there" I was then handed my service medal :( so much for a ceremonial parade. :o

Kevin in Deva, he that was 835827 :ninja:

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Thanks, Kevin. So little information is available oncontemporary Irish medals. Your contribution, tale, and lovely eye-candy is appreciated!

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Hallo Gentlemen :beer:

I would like to take this moment to post pictures of the service medals I was personaly awarded with for my service with the Irish Defence Forces and the United Nations. My period of service was from 6th May 1976 to the 24th October 1997. In total 21 years and 174 days . Military Conduct Rating: EXEMPLARY. :jumping:

THE UNITED NATIONS PEACEKEEPING MEDAL FOR U.N.I.F.I.L. :jumping::jumping:

More than 15,000 Irish soldiers have served overseas on UNO peacekeeping missions since 1948 and I served with No. 6 platoon, "C" Company, 46th Irish Battalion (IRISHBATT), United Nations Interiem Force In Lebanon.

In one of the pictures I am seen receiving my UNIFIL Medal from the then Commandant David Taylor O/C of "C". Company, 46th Irish Batt.

(see http://www.un.org/Depts/dpko/medals/unifil.htm for Mission Information.)

All Irish soldiers are volunteers for service with the United Nations, The Republic of Ireland is not a member of N.A.T.O.

Personal photos from my time in Lebanon with the U.N can be found at:

http://community.webshots.com/album/19736639GtLrLfQGOC

The type of the UN medal presented to the Irish is a thinner version of the one often seen on a short ribbon and broach style pin in the American style and without such a pronounced rim line to the rear.

Irish United Nations Medals are issued un-numbered, but some have been privately engraved by reciepiants.

In Memory of Private's Stephen Griffen, Thomas Barret, Derrek Smallhorne, Killed in Action while on Peace-keeping duties in South Lebanon, with the 46th Irish Battalion, UNIFIL. R.I.P.

Kevin in Deva, he that was 835827 :ninja:

Edited by Kev in Deva

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THE UNITED NATIONS PEACEKEEPING MEDAL FOR U.N.I.F.I.L. :jumping::jumping:

More than 15,000 Irish soldiers have served overseas on UNO peacekeeping missions since 1948 and I served with No. 6 platoon, "C" Company, 46th Irish Battalion (IRISHBATT), United Nations Interiem Force In Lebanon.

THE IRISH SERVICE MEDAL FOR PEACEKEEPING WITH THE UNITED NATIONS.

Irish soldiers (now both male and female) have played a prominent part in United Nations Peace-Keeping since their deployment to the Congo in the 1960's, an up to now, a very large percentage of the Irish Defence Forces, including Naval, and Aer Corps personel have served on the ground, particularly in South Lebanon with U.N.i.F.I.L. While being entitled to the various service medals issued by the United Nations in 1987 it was decided that they should have a special Irish medal for such services, at this time the UN was the receipient of the Nobel Peace Prize for its efforts world-wide in peacekeeping. Countries with soldiers on current peace-keeping missions at that time, designed an appropriate medal of commemoration.

The Irish medals, first issues in a white metal alloy and 35mm in diameter, were made in 1989, and as awards were to be made retrospectively, there will be about 12,000 potential claimanents. Any member or former member of the Defense Forces, who was awarded a United Nations Service Medal may apply for this medal. It may also be claimed by next-of-kin of deceased personnel.

Obverse; A female figure representative of Eire standing on a shoreline, releasing a dove over te sea. The dove holds and olive spray in its beak and on the horizon is a skein of wilf geese.

Reverse; The Legend UNITED NATIONS FOR PEACE in Irish and English. The medal is ssued unnamed.

Ribbon; 32mm wide with a 12mm orange centre stripe bearing a 3mm stripe of UN blue. 5mm white and green stripes on either side, green outer.

Suspension; Straight unswivilled bar through which the ribbon is treaded.

Designers; Captain W. Campbell and Mr.James Hogan.

Manufactuers; P. Quinn Ltd., and Jewellery and Metal Mfg.

The symbolism on the obverse of the medal is that of Irish troops going abroad on peacekeeping duties by the releasing of the dove by Eire, and the wild geese symbolize the ancient tradition of Irishmen leaving their homeland to serve in foreign armies.-

"On far foreign fields from Dunkirk to Belgrade lie the soldiers and chiefs of the Irish Brigade."

Also pictured is my mini medal bar. :jumping::jumping::jumping:

At the Unit I was attached to from my parent Unit, all attachments were fell-in beside the 18th Bn for a parade, then appears Lieutenant-Colonel David Taylor (the same officer who was my CO in Lebanon) and he proceeds to pin the THE IRISH SERVICE MEDAL FOR PEACEKEEPING WITH THE UNITED NATIONS medals on to the chests of deserving members of the 18th, as he neared the end of the line he spotted me and walked over with a medal in his hand, say "Congratulations Ryan, If I remember correctly I had the pleasure of presenting you with your UN medal in Atiri, South Lebanon" and pins the medal to my uniform and shakes my hand, behind him I noticed a certain Captain, hoping from leg to leg and looking very agitated (Weak-Bladder says you!) but no, as Lt-Col Taylor leaves the parade, the Captain comes over and says "Private Ryan, give me that medal its mine, you have no right to that one, your one is with your parent Unit in Donegal" Lt. Col Taylor has no right to present it to you (I thought he was going to cry, he was like a kid who had just had is ice-cream nicked) well being the nice guy I am I said ok say you can have it back tommorrow, I have been invited to the hotel with "Dave" for a beer :cheers: ).

True story honest Injun :D

In Memory of Private's Stephen Griffen, Thomas Barret, Derrek Smallhorne, Killed in Action while on Peace-keeping duties in South Lebanon, with the 46th Irish Battalion, UNIFIL. R.I.P.

Kevin in Deva, he that was 835827 :ninja:

Edited by Kev in Deva

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its mad that iv got medals from syria cuba germany japan russia but non from my own country!!! im going to sort that one out soon though!! very nice pics and info!! good to see another irish man on the forums to!!! happy easter and dont go mad on the chocolate eggs!!!! :beer:

Edited by paddywhack

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Continuing along with the DEFENCE FORCE OF IRELAND MEDALS:

We come to the RESERVE FORCE SERVICE MEDAL / An Bonn Seirbhise F.C.A. - S.M.

The Reserve Forces of the Army and Air-Corps, made up of ex-regulars completing a contract and volunteers from civilian life (mainly students) are known as "AN FORSA COSANTA AITUIL" or F.C.A

(or to us "Auld Sweats" :cheers: as the "Free Clothing Association" :P)

and the Naval Reserve is "AN SLUA MUIRI" or S.M.

(er. . . . SLURRY MURRAY`S ? ? :P ) no offense meant to the ladies and gentlemen of the Reserve Forces, they provide valuable services to free up more of the regulars for Anti-Terrorist and security duties on the Border and in the State etc. . .etc.

These Long Service Medals were introduced on the 13th June, 1961, for all ranks, and may be awarded for 7 years continuous, satisfactory, service, with the addition of a bar for a further 5 years.

The Medal is in Bronze alloy and is 32mm in diameter.

Obverse; The figure of an ancient Irish Foot Soldier or "Kern", dressed in a light tunic with a sword in his belt, a throwing spear in his right hand and in his left an oval shaped sheild bearing a Celtic design.

The legend around this is "FAIRE BIOGDAC TUS NA SAOIRSE" which in English means "ETERNAL VIGILANCE IS THE PRICE OF FREEDOM.

Reverse; The inscription "AN BONN SEIRBHISE FCA AGUS SM" The medals issued unnamed.

Ribbon; The Seven year ribbon is 34mm wide, Saint Patrick Blue with 5mm gold esges, and the twelve year ribbon has an additional 2mm gold stripe in the centre.

Suspension; A straight unswivelled bar affixed to the top of the medal by a claw. The ribbon hangs from a bronze pin-back brooch bearing the words "SEIRBIS" - SERVICE in raised letters and a raised border.

Bars; A bar exactly like that for the Regular Army Service Medal is worn on the ribbon of the twelve year model.

In recent years it was decided to award a further bar for 21 years in service with the F.C.A. & S.M. the bar as a round device in the cetre with the Roman numerals 21.

Designer; Commandant A. Molloy.

Manufacturer; P. Quinn Ltd., Dublin.

Exremely rare to encounter are the miniture medals with either service ribbons (er. . . I somehow ended up with 3 in my collection :rolleyes: )

Kevin in Deva.

Edited by Kev in Deva

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Continuing along with the DEFENCE FORCE OF IRELAND MEDALS:

We come to the RESERVE FORCE SERVICE MEDAL / An Bonn Seirbhise F.C.A. - S.M.

Exremely rare to encounter are the miniture medals with either service ribbons (er. . . I somehow ended up with 3 in my collection :rolleyes: )

Kevin in Deva.

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Another variation of the mini F.C.A & S. M. Service medal this one cast in a darker material,

Kevin in Deva. :beer:

Edited by Kev in Deva

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More shots of the FCA SERVICE MEDAL and a picture of the 21 Year Bar, these were obtained from the net on Ebay until I can get my hands on one for the collection. :D

I must check with old friends in the Irish Defence Forces to see if there was any 21 year Bar proposed for the Regular Army Service Medals, who knows maybe my service medals are due for an upgrade :blush:

Kevin in Deva. :beer:

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Recently added to my collection - The Merchant Marine Medal 1939-46. One of the rarer service medals and earned the hard way. There were 58 medals issued with three bars.

An Ceallach

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Recently added to my collection - The Merchant Marine Medal 1939-46. One of the rarer service medals and earned the hard way. There were 58 medals issued with three bars.

An Ceallach

Hallo Ceallach, :D welcome to the club, and many thanks for posting this rare medal, :love: please feel free to post more Republic of Ireland Service medals.

Kevin in Deva (Transylvania) formerly of Castlebar Co. Mayo.

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Kev- another rare medal. Hopefully these postings will attract some traffic to this thread.

The Military Star is awarded posthumously to members of the Defence Forces killed in hostile circumstances while on military service overseas. The awards of the Military Star are made on the recommendation of a Military Medals Board convened by the Chief of Staff. At a ceremony in Collins Barracks, Dublin on 08 November 1998, a total of thirty-six Military Stars were presented by the Minister for Defence, to the next-of-kin personnel killed in hostilities in the Congo and the Middle East. The Military Star is in the shape of an eight-pointed star, which resembles the Defence Forces Cap Badge - common to all Services in the Defence Forces. The figure in the centre is C? Chulainn - this symbolises the warrior who is killed in action or dies from his wounds. A Laural Wreath to commemorate the dead surrounds the central figure of C? Chulainn. The ribbon colours are black and purple - traditionally associated with the dead and mourning - with the Irish National Colours in the centre. The ribbon is held in place by a suspension bar with the word 'Remembrance' inscribed on it. The Service Number, Name, Date of Death of the deceased and Mission Area are engraved on the back of the Star. (Ref: John McMeekin)

Regards - An Ceallach

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Ceallach,

Many thanks for illustrating this very rare medal. I had the opportunity to handle one last year when I was back in Dublin and I must admit the quality of manufacture is very poor. I do not know what other collectors, or indeed ex-servicemen, think but the standard of Irish medals has got steadily worse over the years. I still think that the best quality medal we ever produced was probably the 1916-66 Commemorative and the best design was the Emergency Service Medal.

What are your thoughts ?

Paul

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Ceallach,

Many thanks for illustrating this very rare medal. I had the opportunity to handle one last year when I was back in Dublin and I must admit the quality of manufacture is very poor. I do not know what other collectors, or indeed ex-servicemen, think but the standard of Irish medals has got steadily worse over the years. I still think that the best quality medal we ever produced was probably the 1916-66 Commemorative and the best design was the Emergency Service Medal.

What are your thoughts ?

Paul

Hi Paul,

I had hoped that my example of the Military Star was not standard for the run, however your observation would appear to confirm the opposite. What a shame. It was a department design with an emphasis I suppose on being conventionally correct and it?s a pity that they chose to revisit the 1916 concept, rather than striking out.

I would agree that the 1916/66 is a quality medal but I would also rank the MMG Class 1 in that category. The design of the Emergency Service Medal is culturally and interpretively interesting and a fine example of medallic art, but lacks the emotive power of the 1916 design which in my mind should be an essential consideration.

Best regards,

An Ceallach

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The Emergency Service Medal 1939/46 was awarded to eleven different organizations within the service, which is reflected on the reverse of these medals. One of these was for "The Chaplaincy Service". As there does not appear to be any official record of the total awarded to this service - could anyone make an educated guess ? They are reportedy changing hands in and around the Euro 10,000 range !!

An Ceallach

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Ceallach,

One estimate that I heard, which may make sense, was about 20 awards. This was based on the fact that there were four commands and army HQ, each of which had 4 chaplains. Assuming a low turnover of personnel, probably a fair assumption, then you have a very small pool of potential recipients. I have not been able to confirm the number of 4 chaplains per command however.

I have only ever once handled one and since it was in Military Archives in Cathal Brugha there was no way it was finding its way into my collection !

Best regards,

Paul

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Gentlemen,

Another recent addition to my collection - a very rare example of the DSM 1st Class. (OBVERSE)

The Distinguished Service Medal (An Bonn Serbhise Dearscna)

In three classes, it may be awarded in recognition of individual or associated acts of gallantry, courage, leadership, resource or devotion to duty (other than one performed on war service) arising out of or service in the Defense Forces not meriting the award of the Military Medal for Gallantry.

The DSM is a rimless medal, 34mm in diameter, in silver for the first class and in bronze for the second and third classes. From December 13, 1984 the classes were designated as ?with Honour?, ?with Distinction? and ?with Merit?.

Obverse: A stylized design of the ancient Irish warrior Cu Chulainn with upraised sword standing in a war chariot drawn by two horses at the gallop. A charioteer crouched beside him whips the horses.

Reverse: Plain with the inscription ?An Bonn Serbhise Dearscna? around the outer edge and the silver medal has an Irish hallmark and the maker?s initials at the bottom.

Ribbons: 32mm wide in dark green with black stripes.

The 1st. class ribbon has a 6mm black centre stripe.

The 2nd class is green with 5mm black edge stripes.

The 3rd class has 3mm black edges and a 3mm black centre stripe.

Suspension: Ring affixed to the top of the medal and pin back brooch suspender in the appropriate metal bearing a design of lozenges, and hallmarked for silver.

Bars: A bar may be awarded to any class of the medal for subsequent acts of gallantry or merit and the medal and bars may be awarded posthumously.

Designer: Oisin Kelly

Manufacturer: P.Quinn Ltd. Dublin

An Ceallach

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Gentlemen,

Another recent addition to my collection - a very rare example of the DSM 1st Class. (REVERSE)

An Ceallach

Edited by Ceallach

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Gentlemen,

Eamonn O'Toole in his book "Decorations and Medals of the Republic of Ireland" states that the DSM's were issued un-named, based on his examination of some examples (pp 15 & 17). However I know of one posthumous award with the recipients name and army number officially inscribed. Do other named examples exist ?

An Ceallach

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A fascinating thread, guys, thanks. Always like learning new things! :beer:

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Ceallach,

What year is the hallmark of your DSM 1st Class ?

I have a privately named DSM 3rd class for Congo in the 1960's in my collection as well as unnamed 1st and 2nd Class medals.

I have also seen a 3rd Class awarded to a sailor on the LE Ashling for taking bodies out of the Atlantic from a Canadian (I think) jet that crashed. He was one of a few crewmembers who went out in a gemini craft to pull bodies out of the water and said that they literally had to kick the sharks away since they were in a feeding frenzy due to all the blood. His medal was unnamed but he was thinking about getting it privately named.

I suspect that the named one you saw was done privately or at the initiative of an individual officer in the department since it was to be used at a presentation. What I have seen so far supports O'Toole, ie. they are issued unnamed which is a great pity.

Regards,

Paul

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Ceallach,

What year is the hallmark of your DSM 1st Class ?

I have a privately named DSM 3rd class for Congo in the 1960's in my collection as well as unnamed 1st and 2nd Class medals.

I have also seen a 3rd Class awarded to a sailor on the LE Ashling for taking bodies out of the Atlantic from a Canadian (I think) jet that crashed. He was one of a few crewmembers who went out in a gemini craft to pull bodies out of the water and said that they literally had to kick the sharks away since they were in a feeding frenzy due to all the blood. His medal was unnamed but he was thinking about getting it privately named.

I suspect that the named one you saw was done privately or at the initiative of an individual officer in the department since it was to be used at a presentation. What I have seen so far supports O'Toole, ie. they are issued unnamed which is a great pity.

Regards,

Paul

Hi Paul,

Overlooked a bit when first read. Actually was an Air India jet, south west of Ireland.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/backgrounde...s_sabotage.html

Ceallach

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I know one of the two Naval Service personnel that got the DSM for the Air India Incident. One is Captain Jim Robinson, presently OCNOC of the Naval Service. Then he was LCDR and Co of the Aisling. The other sailor I forget his name, but I remeber sailing with him on LE Orla. I remember being on parade and him wearing the DSM, everyone else having oly a paltry 10 year service or maybe a Peacekeeping medal.

Mark

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QUOTE(Kev in Deva @ Apr 16 2006, 13:39 )

Hallo Gentlemen beer.gif

I would like to take this moment to post pictures of the service medals I was personaly awarded with for my service with the Irish Defence Forces and the United Nations. My period of service was from 6th May 1976 to the 24th October 1997. In total 21 years and 174 days . Military Conduct Rating: EXEMPLARY. jumping.gif

THE UNITED NATIONS PEACEKEEPING MEDAL FOR U.N.I.F.I.L. jumping.gifjumping.gif

More than 15,000 Irish soldiers have served overseas on UNO peacekeeping missions since 1948 and I served with No. 6 platoon, "C" Company, 46th Irish Battalion (IRISHBATT), United Nations Interiem Force In Lebanon.

In one of the pictures I am seen receiving my UNIFIL Medal from the then Commandant David Taylor O/C of "C". Company, 46th Irish Batt.

(see http://www.un.org/Depts/dpko/medals/unifil.htm for Mission Information.)

All Irish soldiers are volunteers for service with the United Nations, The Republic of Ireland is not a member of N.A.T.O.

Personal photos from my time in Lebanon with the U.N can be found at:

http://community.webshots.com/album/19736639GtLrLfQGOC

The type of the UN medal presented to the Irish is a thinner version of the one often seen on a short ribbon and broach style pin in the American style and without such a pronounced rim line to the rear.

Irish United Nations Medals are issued un-numbered, but some have been privately engraved by reciepiants.

In Memory of Private's Stephen Griffen, Thomas Barret, Derrek Smallhorne, Killed in Action while on Peace-keeping duties in South Lebanon, with the 46th Irish Battalion, UNIFIL. R.I.P.

Kevin in Deva, he that was 835827 ninja.gif

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hello all, i am new to this found you by accident. i am 67 years old and served with the irish army from 1960- 1964, i also served with the united nations peace keeping forces in the CONGO and i dis receive my un medal thereafter. However, in 1969 i lost my medal and now my son keeps asking me if i could apply for another un medal to replace the lost one. I also noticed the there is now another medal available from the irish defence forces for those who received a un medal which sounds exciting. My problem is i have no idea how to go about all this and would really appreicate any advise because my memory is not great and cant remember dates etc but i do remember my army number, can anyone help please,

Many thanks

Christy fleming

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