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Hi all,

Okay... I know enough here to be dangerous :unsure: but that's about it. Basically, here's what I have... here's who the named ones are named to and that's about it. Anything else you'll have to tell me. :rolleyes:

Anyhow here goes... first my minis:

IPB Image

IPB Image

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Pretty sure the all green ribbon on the one is wrong, but again... I just don't know. If it is, and if anyone happens to have a ribbon for it they'd be willing to part with please let me know. Thanks! :cheers:

IPB Image

IPB Image

The green ribboned one is not named. The other is named as follows:

4426 PTE. J. Warren 18th Hussars

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Being in the Merchant Marines... although not active, this one really appeals to me, along with it's color and that of the ribbon. Just really love this one. :love::love:

IPB Image

IPB Image

It's named as follows:

Sher Mohd Awaz Khan

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IPB Image

IPB Image

IPB Image

And not sure if it's important... I forgot to snap a picture of the outside of the case but it says M.B.E. in gold on top.

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And these are "home" mounted for display only... did not come this way.

IPB Image

IPB Image

Named as follows:

Left is:

60895 GNR. H.M. Hunt R.A.

Right is:

34340 N. Kiely SMN. R.N.R.

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IPB Image

This is named as follows:

Andrew Scotland MacLeod

Being a huge Highlander fan I'm rather proud of this one... perhaps it's the great man himself in one of "reincarnations". :rolleyes:

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Guest Darrell

And not sure if it's important... I forgot to snap a picture of the outside of the case but it says M.B.E. in gold on top.

This a a nice one Dan (as are all the ones posted :love: ). This one is called "The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire".

Background:

With WW1 lasting longer than expected and no suitable way to reward services to the war effort by civilians at home and servicemen in support positions, King George V created an Order with 5 grades, the first two conferring knighthood.

The order could be given generously for services to the Empire at home, in India and the Dominions and Colonies. The order was created mainly to reward non-combatant services to the war effort and was to include women, whom most existing orders excluded. When the order was created in 1917 it had only one division, but was divided into Civil and Military divisions in 1918. The order at any level could be awarded for gallantry as well as service.

The Order took an abrupt change in appearance in 1937 when the insignia and the colour of the ribbon were changed.

The Grades:

1. Knight or Dane Grand Cross (GBE/DBE)

2. Knight or Dame Commander (KBE/DBE)

3. Commander (CBE)

4. Officer (OBE)

5. Member (MBE)

Your's is the fifth grade - Member (MBE) - The member wears a silver badge (51mm wide) on the left breast (no enamels).

ORIGINAL BADGE - The circular Center, in Gold, shows the figure of Britannia, holding a trident and seated beside a shield bearing the national flag.

ORIGINAL RIBBON - The civil ribbon was purple (38mm wide). The Military Ribbon had a narrow central stripe of scarlet.

CURRENT BADGE - (After 1937) - As Original except that in the center, in gold, are the crowned effigies of King George V and his consort Queen Mary.

CURRENT RIBBON - (After 1937) - The civil ribbon is rose-pink with pearly-grey edges. The Military ribbon has a narrow central stripe of pearl-grey added.

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Guest Darrell

The last cased one you have is the IMPERIAL SERVICE MEDAL.

Background:

Established in 1902 the medal was given for meritorious service by active members of the Civil Service throughout the Empire / Commonwealth. The recipient must have had at least 25 years service or 16 years in unhealthy places abroad. There was no limit to the number of medals awarded.

From 1902 - 1920, the medal was a seven-pointed star in silver and bronze like the order. After 1920, it was circular, silver medal, 32mm in diameter.

The Case should be embossed "IMPERIAL SERVICE MEDAL" .

P.S. I got one off e-bay and it should arrive this week. These are fairly common, but under appreciated. Nice find there :beer:

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This a a nice one Dan (as are all the ones posted :love: ). This one is called "The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire".

Background:

With WW1 lasting longer than expected and no suitable way to reward services to the war effort by civilians at home and servicemen in support positions, King George V created an Order with 5 grades, the first two conferring knighthood.

The order could be given generously for services to the Empire at home, in India and the Dominions and Colonies. The order was created mainly to reward non-combatant services to the war effort and was to include women, whom most existing orders excluded. When the order was created in 1917 it had only one division, but was divided into Civil and Military divisions in 1918. The order at any level could be awarded for gallantry as well as service.

The Order took an abrupt change in appearance in 1937 when the insignia and the colour of the ribbon were changed.

The Grades:

1. Knight or Dane Grand Cross (GBE/DBE)

2. Knight or Dame Commander (KBE/DBE)

3. Commander (CBE)

4. Officer (OBE)

5. Member (MBE)

Your's is the fifth grade - Member (MBE) - The member wears a silver badge (51mm wide) on the left breast (no enamels).

ORIGINAL BADGE - The circular Center, in Gold, shows the figure of Britannia, holding a trident and seated beside a shield bearing the national flag.

ORIGINAL RIBBON - The civil ribbon was purple (38mm wide). The Military Ribbon had a narrow central stripe of scarlet.

CURRENT BADGE - (After 1937) - As Original except that in the center, in gold, are the crowned effigies of King George V and his consort Queen Mary.

CURRENT RIBBON - (After 1937) - The civil ribbon is rose-pink with pearly-grey edges. The Military ribbon has a narrow central stripe of pearl-grey added.

Since this is an early award it can be dated by checking out the hallmark against any standard silver guide. It probably will be 1919.

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Joseph Furness - ISM awarded 22 August 1930 - Postman, Glasgow.

Andrew Scotland MacLeod - ISM awarded 17 Jan. 1964 - Postman, Edinburgh.

Steve

Hi Steve,

May thanks! Wow, that was fast service! :cheers: Just out of curiosity is there any way to get copies of any paperwork on any of these that I have? Or... I shudder to even think it... a picture of the original recipient... I really, really shudder... wearing the decoration in question? :unsure:;):rolleyes::blush:

Just not very familiar with such research. But that's my dream with any of the awards I have that may be traceable... to be able to get info as well as a pic(s) preferably of the award being worn.

Many thanks! :cheers:

Dan

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The Case should be embossed "IMPERIAL SERVICE MEDAL" .

P.S. I got one off e-bay and it should arrive this week. These are fairly common, but under appreciated. Nice find there :beer:

Hi Darrell,

Many thanks for the compliments. :D And many congrats on you getting one to add to your collection. They aren't fancy but they've very nice and I do love em' :love::love: ! Definitely send pics of your's when it arrives... would love to see. :love::jumping:

On the case though of the Service Medal, there is no title on the top... only an outer gold line that goes around the case. And no evidence that there was ever any wording on it as generally even if the gold wears off you can still read the words as of course they're impressed into the material.

No idea if this makes a difference or not. :unsure:

Thanks, :cheers:

Dan

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Since this is an early award it can be dated by checking out the hallmark against any standard silver guide. It probably will be 1919.

Hi Michael,

Many thanks for the info. Sorry I don't have a scanner yet so can't get that finely detailed a shot... however, I'm looking at it under a loop and here's what it has... as best I can make out. ;):unsure:

In the first impression is a capital SG in a rectangular boxed impression.

The next one is a lion, facing left, standing on the hind paws with the front legs raised as if on the attack. It's in a square boxed impression but with two "points" coming up from the bottom.

The next is "I think" (hard to tell as it's rather small) a shield with crossed swords behind it. It's also in a square boxed impression with two "points" coming up from the bottom.

The last one is "I think" a letter D in kind of a Gothic font... looks almost like it could be an O but it's got a swing up from the right to the upper left that comes off the top... Kim checked it too as she's excellent with fonts and she agrees that's it's probably a D. And it's in the same kind of boxed impression with the two "points", etc. as above.

Hope this helps.

Thanks, :cheers:

Dan

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Guest Darrell

Hi Dan,

AS posted else where, I have one Imperial Service Medal (as part of a WW1 and WW2 grouping). It came with the actual document from award date 1963.

John Alvey

Edited by Darrell

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