Mossy

Hungary - WW2 medals

81 posts in this topic

I couldn't find a thread for these already, so i'm starting a new one. I personally think the Hungaria stuff is really overlooked. But then, so is alot of the axis nation stuff, it all seems to hide in the shadow of the TR. Which is just fine for me!

These three medals are for the capture of south and eastern slovakia, transylvania and parts of yugoslavia. There's also a pic of the paratroop jacket they are with.

Sam.

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Hallo Gentlemen, while attending a collectors fair in Brasov, central Romania I obtained the following;

A Hungarian Horty "A HAZAERT 1942 Medal, I have heard these were issued to Hungarians serving with the SS also most were awarded Post-Mortem :unsure: this cross has suffered a little damage in that the point of the left sword has broken off, it came complete with the original ribbon and a small document in Hungarian

and I would be obliged for a translation, and an idea of value, the document bears a relief of the cross and is signed and stamped.

Kevin in Deva. :beer:

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ID: 4   Posted (edited)

The cross.

Edited by Kev in Deva

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The cross.

Rear of document and rear of cross

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This is the "Fire Cross," Hungary's equivalent of the Rumanian Crusade Against Communism Medal.

With swords-and-wreath it was given to combatants. With wreath and no swords to operational zone noncombatants, and plain no-wreath/no Xs to stay at homes mobilized inside Hungary. The dates 1941, 1942, and 1943 will be found on each type depending on when they qualified.

No 1944 dated ones though. And I have no idea what happened if somebody got a stay at home in 1941, then qualified for say an operational noncombatant in 1942, but were at the front in 1943-- presumably they could only wear ONE of them.

A very small aluminum bar was placed on the ribbon for each wound or (so this could also happen with a Stayed Home type) service related injury.

Magyar isn't one of my languages, but I can't even SEE the blurred, runny lettering on the document. Sorry.

That is the correct ribbon-- eactly the same for all three types, and identical to the WW1 Commemorative Medal for combatants.

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ID: 7   Posted (edited)

This is the "Fire Cross," Hungary's equivalent of the Rumanian Crusade Against Communism Medal.

With swords-and-wreath it was given to combatants. With wreath and no swords to operational zone noncombatants, and plain no-wreath/no Xs to stay at homes mobilized inside Hungary. The dates 1941, 1942, and 1943 will be found on each type depending on when they qualified.

No 1944 dated ones though. And I have no idea what happened if somebody got a stay at home in 1941, then qualified for say an operational noncombatant in 1942, but were at the front in 1943-- presumably they could only wear ONE of them.

A very small aluminum bar was placed on the ribbon for each wound or (so this could also happen with a Stayed Home type) service related injury.

Magyar isn't one of my languages, but I can't even SEE the blurred, runny lettering on the document. Sorry.

That is the correct ribbon-- eactly the same for all three types, and identical to the WW1 Commemorative Medal for combatants.

Hallo Rick, :beer:

Thanks for taking a look and thanks for the information on the "FIRE CROSS" sorry about the small picture, with the picture restriction this is the best I could do will try a scan and see what happens. the ink has stained at sometime the document was damp but its legibale in some areas when looked at close up. Above the signature the word Anna is clearly visable All we need now is a knowledgable Hungarian translator :o

Kevin in Deva. :beer:

Edited by Kev in Deva

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Igazolv?ny a "T?zkereszt" visel?s?nek jogosults?g?r?l Krizs?n J?nos honv. r?sz?re. = "Certificate entitling private soldier J?nos Krizs?n to wear the Fire Cross" - Hungarians place family name first.

Milyen fokozat visel?s?re jogosult _______ = "What class entitled to wear" - hard to read, but looks like "1st class, swords, something"

H?nyszor sebes?lt _______ = "How often wounded" - looks like nothing written

Sz?let?si ?v _______ = "Year of birth" - illegible

Sz?l?anyja le?nykori n?ve _______ = "Mother's maiden name" - illegible except for Anna

Azonoss?gi sz?ma _______ = "Identification number" - illegible

The stamp is for the Royal Hungarian Military [something] Command.

As for the text in the upper left, I am not sure what the abbreviation "ny.t.sz?m." means, other than sz?m means number. I assume it is the orders authorizing the cross. The first line is an abbreviation for a military command, with the second line probably the order # for 1943.

Can't read the signature at the bottom.

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Igazolv?ny a "T?zkereszt" visel?s?nek jogosults?g?r?l Krizs?n J?nos honv. r?sz?re. = "Certificate entitling private soldier J?nos Krizs?n to wear the Fire Cross" - Hungarians place family name first.

Milyen fokozat visel?s?re jogosult _______ = "What class entitled to wear" - hard to read, but looks like "1st class, swords, something"

H?nyszor sebes?lt _______ = "How often wounded" - looks like nothing written

Sz?let?si ?v _______ = "Year of birth" - illegible

Sz?l?anyja le?nykori n?ve _______ = "Mother's maiden name" - illegible except for Anna

Azonoss?gi sz?ma _______ = "Identification number" - illegible

The stamp is for the Royal Hungarian Military [something] Command.

As for the text in the upper left, I am not sure what the abbreviation "ny.t.sz?m." means, other than sz?m means number. I assume it is the orders authorizing the cross. The first line is an abbreviation for a military command, with the second line probably the order # for 1943.

Can't read the signature at the bottom.

Hallo Dave and Ricky, :beer: ,

Dave you must have top class eyesight to get all that info from a bad picture, and it seems yours definition of whats there is so far spot on, yesterday I had a visitor to my house in Deva, a schoolfriend of my step-daughter who is of Hungarian extraction (sounds like a bad dentist Joke :P ) the young lady was able to read about 90% and has taken the document home for her Mother to have a look at, and make a written translation, in the hand its more legible than a picture or scan, still I imagine documentation for this award to a named individual must be scarce?? as many were dumped as the Russians moved in.

Kevin in Deva :beer:

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ID: 10   Posted (edited)

Hi Sam - can we see more photos of the Paratrooper Tunic - they are really rare! Here is mine - no medal loops, belived that the owner was KIA in the 1941 Balkan campaign. Rank is corporal, tunic was manufactured in 1938 and the collar was converted in 1939-40 per regulations. First type paratrooper badge.

Edited by hunyadi

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Here is some interesting anomolies for the Return of Hungary variety. First is a Return of Southern Hungary - Balkan Campaign medal. What is unique is that the medal is made from aluminum instead of zinc. The normal issue items were made of zinc - but you could privatly purchase aluminum versions for parade dress wear as these looked much nicer. Also has a very rare lapel pin of the medal iteself for civilain wear.

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Wish I had a name with this one - found it in a pawn shop. Fire Cross 1942 issue date with two wound stripes and a device for a second award. Also has a Return of Norhtern Hungary medal. Nothing else was with the group. Presumably the man was a conscript soldier during 1938 and recieved the medal for his serivce, then when hostilities in Russia broke out - he was called back up again and served for 6 months (minimum) at the front. Was wounded twice - probably along the Don River Bend.

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[attachmentid=56179]And finaly my favorite - A Panzer Lt. Tunic

Great stuff :jumping::jumping:

Is it possible to see close ups of the medal bar & badges on this tunic please?

Kevin in Deva. :beer:

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THAT...is a great tunic!

What are the badges?

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ID: 18   Posted (edited)

here they are - medal bar set - one loop for silver Signum Laudis or Konghts Cross. Dot know for sure what - a previous owner liked that one more than me...

Edited by hunyadi

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Combat leadership badge - unfortunatly I dont have photos of the other items as it is in sotrage now.

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Sorry Jeff-

Forgot to mention about the badges -

Top Left - unofficial Tank Battle Badge - these were private purchase as some commanders encouraged them to be worn. Similar to the PAB of the German allies. You were not encouraged to get one until you had proven your steel in battle.

Center Left - Officers Combat Leadership Badge - I hear lots about this, but to my understanding this was simply a badge that was given to officers / warrant offciers uppon completion of a military academy or university. Nothing more.

Lower Left - Sport Badge for competing in the yearly national sport competition - its a silver grade.

Lower Right - Vitezi Rend - Order of the Knight. It is unclear to me if this was a case of the individual being the son of a Vitez (a WW1 veteran who distinguished himslef during the war) in which case the son is the heir to the land given out by the award and so was therefore eligible to wear the Order - or if he distingushed himself in battle and was awarded it. Since he was more than likely 1st Armored at the Don River - its entirely possible. This tank commander saw some serious action as a simple 2nd Lt.

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Great stuff guys! This is the first WW2 Hungarian collection I have seen! How common were German awards to Hungarian Servicemen?

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Not very common at all - This is the only tunic with a EK ribbon on it that I own. I added the EK as this was the common practice for 'parade'. The only two real big engagments that the Hungarians were workiogn alongside the Germans to qualify for German awawrds was the Don River Bend 1943 and the Battle of Budapest 1944/45. 6 (or was it 8 - dont have my source in front of me right now) Hungarians were awarded the RK (generals mostly) During the retreat from the Don River Bend scertain untis were mixed in with German ones and attempted several counter attacks. More than likely this is where the 2nd Lt won his EK2. The next most common to see is the Ostfront Medal as they served in Army Group South buring the winter of 41/42 with the Germans. Though many qualified and were probably awarded, there are only a few that I have seen to have the ribbon on the tunic.

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ID: 23   Posted (edited)

Here are a few more - Large Silver Bravery Medal. (Probably equal to an EK1)

Edited by hunyadi

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ID: 25   Posted (edited)

Here is an example of the Vitezi Rend (Order of the Knight) that I got today! :jumping: (well its at least exciting for me) :beer:

sorry about the poor photo the enamel kept shining back with and without the flash...

Edited by hunyadi

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