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French Croix de Guerre WWI

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NICE!! :cheers:

You have some realy nice examples. I need to get a scanner so I can post some of my nicer ones.

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NICE!! :cheers:

You have some realy nice examples. I need to get a scanner so I can post some of my nicer ones.

Thank you! I think...I don't know if I'm ever going to quit "acquiring" if I keep seeing all the other collections and beautiful items you and others show. :rolleyes: Inspiring to say the least and unfortunately, I recently missed another 1915 with attachments & fourragere. :banger: Something I am still looking for, along with another 1917.

I especially like the CdG in post #50, as it is the only one I have with a gold star & silver palm. Appears he only missed getting the silver star.

Tim :beer:

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I had previously asked in another thread about the different die characteristics on the 1918 CdG. I never did get any response, so maybe I can try again here.

Here are three different date styles on the 1918 version. Not sure of any timeline or if these are simply differences due to different manufacturers, but I posted the finer details going left to right with the thoughts that the one on the right was probably the later of the three.

Note the "8" and how if slants.

Tim

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Hello all,

I recently picked this 1914-1916 Croix de Guerre as part of a small 3 group consisting of the CDG, Combatant Cross, and victory medal. Being primarily a victory medal collector I was intrigued by the size of the bronze star on the CDG.

It is secured by a screw attachment on the reverse as seen on the pic.

I have checked my copy of 'Petite Histoire De La Grande Guerre Au Travers Des Décorations Attribuées Aux Poilus' by André Pascual and it doesn't mention it there. It is far larger than any other bronze star I have seen nor any of the others posted here. Is this an official or unofficial attachment?

Happy for any thoughts as to what a bronze star this size represents.

Regards,

Rob

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I had previously asked in another thread about the different die characteristics on the 1918 CdG. I never did get any response, so maybe I can try again here.

Here are three different date styles on the 1918 version. Not sure of any timeline or if these are simply differences due to different manufacturers, but I posted the finer details going left to right with the thoughts that the one on the right was probably the later of the three.

Note the "8" and how if slants.

Tim

Hi,

I am guessing various makers over a long period of time.

Best

Chris

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Hi Rob,

My guess on your CdG, is that perhaps the star was replaced at one point with whatever the member could find available. The original attachments had pretty flimsy pins and often broke off if not handled appropriately.

Orignal pins/palms are not always easy to find, so perhaps just a attempt to put a star back on. Is there any evidence of two small pin holes close to each other under the current screwback?

Tim :cheers:

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Hi,

I am guessing various makers over a long period of time.

Best

Chris

Hi Chris!

Yes, as I collect more and more of the French and Belgian pieces, I am starting to believe the variations in the different awards are only a case of different manufacturers. Other than minor die flaws (dirty dies apparently), I am not seeing any real progression in die traits or evidence of reworked dies on items here, like we do see in the German WWII area of collecting.

The three "types" of 1918 CdG I posted above appear to be the only variations that I have been seeing thus far, so perhaps there were only these three different variations or manufacturers of these awards?

Tim

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Hi Rob,

My guess on your CdG, is that perhaps the star was replaced at one point with whatever the member could find available. The original attachments had pretty flimsy pins and often broke off if not handled appropriately.

Orignal pins/palms are not always easy to find, so perhaps just a attempt to put a star back on. Is there any evidence of two small pin holes close to each other under the current screwback?

Tim cheers.gif

Hello Tim.

I have checked the front and back of the ribbon and there are no pin holes or marks. Even directly underneath the large star there are no pin marks. Where the screw has been pushed through the ribbon it has left a large hole but this has not caused any pulls in the ribbon.

On closer inspection it just looks like the individual has just placed a larger than normal star on his ribbon.biggrin.gif

Regards,

Rob

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Hi Rob,

Well, certainly not what would be considered "official" but, as we have seen on several period originals, there appears lots of room for variation.

Could be a period-done enhancement by the member for one reason or another; lack of the official attachment, addition of some unit badge or memento of rememberance, or nothing more than a veteran embellishing his award. Either way, a nice medal with an interesting and unique piece of history. :cheers:

Tim

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Hi Rob and everybody else!

Rob, here's another case in point to variations encountered. This CdG is the 1915 type and has a bronze star attached. Interestingly, an unknown "Soissons" badge is pinned to the ribbon. The ribbon does show some evidence of other holes that may indicate the badge was moved down a bit (perhaps for a better look?) or, some other attachment had been there before.

The battle of Soissons was actually in 1918, so for this (unit badge/battle commemorative)pin to be placed on a 1915 medal, might indicate the member received the CdG early on and then fought at Soissons. Or, someone just added it after the fact, knowing I'm a sucker for different things! :o:whistle:

Tim

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Nice looking pin and it's two-piece construction. Looks silver covered brass/bronze with a copper "Soissons" clasp.

Tim

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Nice crosses from all and great work from Tim B to show the variations and his examples, really stunning.

But what about some Medal Bars with Croix de guerre?

I never saw a French one, but from the other hand I own one from a Serbia trooper.

French and Serbian Divisions fight next to each other in Thesaloniki front as it's known.....

As this cross is bought directly from Serbia, with the rest of the medal Bar, but without the Karageorge Gold Bravery star which is expensive so I got one on another Bar and here is only for reference, it is good to see that Croix de Guerre who have been awarded to Serbian troops are the1914-1918 variation.

I saw 3 of them from Serbian troopers and all of them are this variation, so it's good for someone that make a research in the future to know about this detail.

But,enough talks, let's enjoy the Bar now....cool.gif

009SERBIAMEDALBAR5.png

010SERBIAMEDALBAR6.png

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Thanks Tachel,

1st is KARAGEORGE BRAVERY GOLD MILITARY STAR with Swords

3rd COMMEMORATIVE MEDAL for the ALBANIAN RETREAT 1915

4th WW I commemorative CROSS for participation in WW I 1914-1918

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Emanuel,

That is a great looking bar; 1st Serbian bar w/CdG I've even seen! :cheers:

Thanks for adding this one to the thread! :beer:

Tim

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But what about some Medal Bars with Croix de guerre?

I never saw a French one...

Emanuel,

I've never seen a French medal bar, period. They wear their medals all individually pinned on the uniform. I've seen the odd attempt at a bar but since they wear their medals only 3 wide, it gets complicated and quite cumbersome really fast.

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Emanuel,

I've never seen a French medal bar, period. They wear their medals all individually pinned on the uniform. I've seen the odd attempt at a bar but since they wear their medals only 3 wide, it gets complicated and quite cumbersome really fast.

A croix de guerre is the badge indicating a "citation individuelle" (i.e.personnal mention) at various levels of command - regimental, division, army-corps, Army. A distinctive addition on the ribbon (star or palm) is used to indicate the level. Period ....

The croix de guerre is comparable to the British Military Medal and Distinguished Service Medal, the German Iron Cross, American Silver and Bronze Crosses.

No clasps were ever meant to be worn, since the various combat areas of a same war or campaign are indicaded by clasps on the appropriate commemorative medal.

The very attractive badge added on the ribbon of Tim's croix de guerre is probably a local branch badge certainly not intended for such use. Veterans were/are apt to be imaginative.

The 1914-1915 croix de guerre was given for acts of valour in the early stages of WW1. They were highly regarded. The value of the Croix de guerre was never really questioned during the War, but a very large number of men who fought well received it

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