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  2. I may be wrong but I seem to recall this being described as a 'militia badge'. I would also lean, slightly, towards it being authentic, but it's way out of my main fields of collecting.
  3. Noice! I am considering getting a deep/ultra cameo proof ASE (&/or Maple Leaf.)
  4. Today
  5. Hi Christer! I don´t think you´ll find something in the bavarian ranklist, because the unit was formed in december 1914. The rankjlist of honour shows a Freiherr v. Gemmingen-Guttenberg (Max), but he was killed in Rumania 1916.
  6. Hello, they dont carry the Red star on the Oval cockade , in its place is a plain 5 pointed gold star . on the aircrafts is painted a 5 points star but in the national colours of white red and blue .
  7. Looks as a cap badge for Territorial Army for Christians ,the non Christians used a plate . the quality of Imperial Rusian Army pieces of uniform varied enormously ,
  8. Thank You Martinka, If I understanded well your post ,the medal is fake because must have the monogram of King Carol I and not the one of Carol II
  9. Yesterday
  10. Just a guess on my part, but it appears to be a commemorative medal for the 2nd Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, U.S. Volunteers who served during the Spanish American War. Even today, some states will double up on medals awarded by the federal government, especially when a service member transfers to the National Guard or State Guard. Old photos of veterans often show them wearing a mix of federal, state and locally procured medals.
  11. Set to be released tomorrow, 8th July 2020! http://news.coinupdate.com/ngc-designations-and-label-options-for-the-2020-w-burnished-silver-eagle/
  12. Adding to the information on this thread about various manufacturers of the Mixed Courts badges, and some peripheral associations with these tribunals, I have found an example of a business card for the individual from the well-known Bichay family who designed and executed a 1949 coin issued to commemorate the closure of the Mixed Courts, Sadek Tefik Bichay. He designed and cast the King Farouk I coin issued on the date of the closure of the Mixed Courts, October 14, 1949. I have previously illustrated the silver and a bronze versions of these coins in my posts of 3 May, 2018. The reverse of the commemorative coin bears the signature initials “S.T.B.” that annab (daughter of Fahmy Tewfik Bichay) identified in her post of 3 June, 2018 on this thread as the initials of Sadek Tewfik Bichay, the brother of Fahmy Tewfik Bichay. She stated that her father did not produce any (or possibly only very few) coins, but that Sadek Tewfik Bichay did mint coins. In my posts of 17 October, 2018 on this thread I presented an image of the commemorative stamp issued on 14 October, 1949 to mark the closure of these International Tribunals (2nd photo). In that post, I identified the design on the reverse of this commemorative coin (that I illustrated as the 1st photo in that post of 17 October) as derived from the commemorative stamp. I also posted 2 different designs of first day cover envelopes issued to commemorate the closure of the Mixed Courts. On October 25, 2018 I illustrated 2 additional examples (one with a unique first day cover design stamped on the envelope) of first day cover envelopes for this event, and on 14 November, 2018 I illustrated another example of a different first day cover envelope design. The silver version of the King Farouk I coin commemorating the closure of the Mixed Courts on 14 October, 1949. This image comes from an 18 May, 2018 action by Stephen Album Rare Coins archived on the icollector.com Online Collectibles Auctions website (http://www.icollector.com/EGYPT-Farouk-1936-1952-AR-medal-32-27g-1949-EF_i29825948) and on the sixbid.com website (https://www.sixbid.com/browse.html?auction=4785&category=141394&lot=3944922). The obverse (L) is a portrait of King Farouk I. The Arabic inscription on the lower right underneath the bust of Farouk is that of Sadek Tewfik Bichay. The reverse design (R) is derived from the commemorative stamp issued on the that of the Mixed Courts closure. The initials "S.T.B." on the lower right margin is that of Sadek Tewfik Bichay. I previously included this illustration as he 1st image in my post of 3 May, 2018 and as the last image in my post of 28 February, 2018 on this thread. Both of those posts have some additional information about this coin. Card of Sadek Tewfik Bichaï in an envelope (see below), from an eBay auction of May 2020 (https://www.ebay.com/itm/EGYPT-Letter-Head-Card-Advertising-Tewfik-Bichai-Medals-Decorations-Badges-/274147344245). This illustration shows just the card with the English spelling of Bichaï. It identifies his address as 2 rue Chérif Pacha, which is the same street where manufacturers of the Mixed Courts badges Rudolf Stobbe, Wolf Horovitz, Zivy Frére & Cie. and Laurencin & Cie. were located in Alexandria. Image from the same eBay offering showing the Sadek Tewfik Bichaï card against the reverse of an envelope with a return address marking with the more common spelling of the last name “SADEK T. BICHAY”. Front of the same envelope as shown in the previous photo from the same eBay listing. The eBay auction description identifies an approximate date of 1954 for this card. I cannot see any year date on the postmark on the envelope. However, this form of an agriculture design postal stamp was issued in a 2 mill version (printed in purple or brown), a 3 mill (printed in blue), and this 4 mill versions in green that all were issued on 23 January, 1953.
  13. Ale bez hesla v medailóne a kódu Carol II namiesto Carol I.
  14. Thanks Andy , That was super interesting , a almost forgotten small unit from the Great War . What I could find out the Gruppe Lindau was a Bavarian unit. maybe I can find something in the Bavarian rank list. Thanks again , now the man in the Bodensee Flotille at least has a thread here to their memory Christer
  15. hello colleagues, I found these RAF shoulder titles. What would you say about his originality? I appreciate your opinions.
  16. Not easy to find this model in France except by ebay. It is a good official model.
  17. Спасибо, Жан-Мишель! I bought a medal in France!
  18. Hello colleagues, I found a medal as it is and I really liked it, but I don't know anything about it. Could you help me with information about her? When was it instituted and with what criteria? I appreciate your opinions!
  19. It's a typical early Arthus Bertrand breast star of Grand Officer, just the crossed swords above the center, doesn't exist. So yes it was added later to try to "bait" a potential collector, who would have believe in the "fairy tale" that he was going to get a unique item. People who lives far away from Europe, and far away from Belgium or Netherlands, or France where most of these Order have been awarded got rarely the occasion to get to see variation of insignia of Order Adolph Nassau, and believe me, there is, but mainly there is variation in low ranks. For the 2 higher grades of the Order, there is very very few variation. And crossed swords above the center of the 2nd Class breast star, it doesn't exist. Even if one, can admit, that a manufacturer may have presented what would look like such an insignia, in case the Grand Duke of Luxembourg would have agreed to changes the legislation of the Order, and open provision "For Military Merit in Time of Peace"......but it never materialized in the facts. As that breast star was for sale by Carsten Zeige, everybody should exerce caution. Regards to all. Emmanuel
  20. Hello! Do you speak german? https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%96sterreichisch-Deutsche_Bodenseeflottille
  21. Has anyone come across any badges/insignia of the Gilbert & Ellis Islands Constabulary please? They were a Pacific British protectorate from 1892 and colony from 1916 until 1 January 1976 when they became independent as Tuvalu and Kiribati. There are some documents referenced in the National Library of Australia, but nothing is available online. NW
  22. Hi guys! Not my field of collecting. I don´t know if this poor one is a real cap badge or a crap badge? Cany anyone shed some light on this issue? My research indicated that it might be a cap badge, or at least want to resemble one 😃
  23. Just bought a Postcard sent August 1918 , and stamped Deutsche BodenSee Flotille Gruppe Lindau Does anyone know anything of this unit ? Had Germany marine Troops in BodenSee ? Or is it a Marine Air unit ... Christer
  24. Out of curiosity.... how would we be certain the star is genuine and not just a genuine breast star where someone added swords that were never there. If swords on top is not a "legal" version within this order my assumption would be added later to enhance value or to get credit for services not rendered or I could see that a jeweler/producer created the star that did not have the tools to make it and made it in a non confirmative fashion.
  25. Last week
  26. I see they fake low classes now...I hope they sell them as low priced souvenirs
  27. Hello Gentlemen, Nowhere in the Luxembourg legal text concerning award, there is a mention of swords crossed above center of a breast star. In the german, romanian, & bulgarian system, it would indicates an award to a military in peace time. But no such things exist in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. Obviously the breast star is guenuine , but typical manufacture from Arthus Bertrand. We can assume that this breast star is a "freak" as Ernst Blass had had manufactured items that never existed, in the purpose to deceive collectors. I remember having seen this star at the time of the auction, better if no body has bought it. Regards. Emmanuel
  28. I recently encountered a high-resolution image of an unmarked Mixed Courts silver badge with a couple of unique design executions. This is the same badge as I illustrated as the 7th image of my post of 24 March, 2017. I did not attribute the source of that lower-resolution image at the time, but it was from an archived past eMedals auction listing, Item W0248. Other than the dimensions, (118 x 88 mm), there was no significant information in that eMedals listing (https://www.emedals.com/africa/egypt-judicial-badge-w0248). I did not notice the couple of relatively minor design differences in that image until finding this higher resolution photo. High-resolution image of a Mixed Court silver judicial badge from an archived auction listing from the Bill and Angela Strong Medal Collection auctioned by Dix Noonan Webb on 18 May, 2011 (Lot 503; https://www.dnw.co.uk/auction-archive/lot-archive/lot.php?department=Medals&lot_uid=199538). This photo can be zoomed for additional detail of the design and execution of this badge. This 2011 listing also has no information beyond the dimensions, also given as 118 X 88 mm. There is no information about the manufacturer, and no photo of the reverse is provided. The past eMedals listing of this same badge does include 3 images of the reverse. No maker’s marks nor Egyptian (or other) silver hallmarks are present on the reverse of this badge. All aspects of the Dix Noonan Webb image of this badge are identical to the eMedals listing, including scratches on the central tablet with the enameled inscription. The workmanship of this badge is very good, and I initially thought it likely it was a Froment-Meurice manufactured badge (or possible Stobbe). However, a couple of distinctly different design elements are present that do not appear on any Froment-Meurice pieces where the manufacturer’s name is present on the reverse, where it is associated with a case labeled with the name of Froment-Meurice, or other badges that lack the Froment-Meurice maker’s mark (apparently not uncommon) but have reasonable probability to be the work of that atelier. In comparison with internet images of other Mixed Court badges, these anomalous design components also are not seen on any with secure attributions to other makers (Stobbe, Horovitz, Laurencin & Co., or Zivy Frère). I also have not seen any of these unique, though minor, design variations in any other internet images of Mixed Court badges without any makers’ attributions. The most obvious design difference of this Dix Noonan Webb silver Mixed Courts badge is the presence of 2 small relief elements on the inferior margin of each of the crossed branches of oak (left) and laurel (right). This is shown above in the detail of the inferior portion of this badge. The portion of each branch just lateral of the loop binding them with the symbol of the Ottoman Order of Medjidie, just inside the 2 proximal ends of the staffs of the tughs emerging from the inferior margin of the central inscribed tablet are not present on any other examples I have seen of the Mixed Court badges of any court (gold for the Appeals Court; gold & silver for the District Courts; and silver for the Parquet that also were used by several different court officials who were not judges). As noted, the workmanship is excellent on this piece, and otherwise strongly resembles that of Froment-Meurice badges. It also resembles the craftsmanship of the Stobbe Mixed Court badges, which I find the 2ndmost carefully made of these regalia. However, it appear that the detail is more closely similar to Froment-Meurice than Stobbe pieces. I do not know whether this could be an unusual casting of the badge by Froment-Meurice, or the manufacture of another jeweler with equivalent skill and careful production. Another apparent design difference, although more subtle, appears to be slightly different folds in the corners of the mantle tied with the tasseled cords. The bunched corner of the right & left sides of the mantle both look more like the folds seen in the 2 Stobbe examples I have included below than the Froment-Meurice examples. The details of the tassels (this is especially apparent on the detail of the upper portion of the tassle above the fringe) more closely resemble the workmanship of Froment-Meurice than of Stobbe. Note that the position of the rays of the basal embellishment relative to the more central elements of the design can vary even within single manufacturers. This can be readily seen in comparing the position of longer, shorter, and more angled rays in relation to the tassels tying the corners of the mantles of several of the examples shown below in the high-resolution photos of the Froment Meurice or Stobbe-made badges. The lozenges and dots on the headband of the crown are much thinner, smaller, and slightly more uneven than on the Froment-Meurice examples or the Stobbe pieces. This decorative headband border also is less regular than on the one Horovitz example I have encountered. Overall, the workmanship on most other elements, such as the leaves of the branches, the interior modeling of the fur of the mantle, and the ermine tails are very similar to the Froment-Meurice pieces. The fringe on the mantle is very lively, and appears identical in many aspects of the slightly irregular spacing of individual fringe elements, especially compared with the photo of the Heritage Auctions example. The Stobbe, examples are more even, lacking the feel of liveliness that the slight irregularities in the Froment-Meurice pieces show. The photo of the one Laurencin & Cie. example I have found may not be high enough resolution to show this, but it also appears quite even which does not convey the feeling of movement that the Froment-Meurice pieces do. As I noted in my post of24 April, 2019 on this thread, the Zivy Frère example exhibits the least-skilled workmanship of any example I have seen of these Mixed Court badges. These differences made me realize that while I did provide comparative images of makers’ marks on the reverse of some of these badges in my post of 28 February, 2019, I have not systematically illustrated most of the obverse designs for badges with secure attributions for comparative viewing. Below, I include the highest-resolution images of the obverse of badges with secure (or reasonably secure) attributions to these different manufacturers for comparison with the unattributed Dix Noonan Webb illustration above. I have grouped images of these other Mixed Court badges below by manufacturers for comparison of slight design differences and the craftsmanship of their execution. Please refer to the posts where I previously included some of these photos where I have discussed them for any additional information available about these particular Mixed Court badges. Émile Froment- Meurice, Paris: Above is the Froment-Meurice manufactured District Court badge that is identified as having belonged to Joseph Timmermans. This photo can be zoomed for greater detail. I initially included this very high-resolution image as the 1st photo of my post of October 31, 2018. This photo comes from a Jean Elsen & ses Fils S.A. auction of 13 Sept, 2014 archived on acsearch.info (https://www.acsearch.info/search.html?id=3990624). Although there is no photo of the reverse of this badge, the workmanship is consistent with other Froment-Meurice pieces and the attirbuion to this maker in the auction description seems reliable. I also illustrated this badge as the 10th photo of my post of 18 April, 2019 discussing Joseph Timmemans career with the Mixed Courts. Above is a very high-resolution excellent image of a silver Mixed Courts badge that was made by Froment-Meurice. This photo can be zoomed for good detail of the Maison Froment-Meurice design and workmanship. This illustration comes from a Heritage world Coin Auction of 15-16 January, 2019, Lot #6093, that is archived on the NumisBids, LLC. website (https://www.numisbids.com/n.php?p=lot&sid=2946&lot=36093). This photo can be zoomed for good detail of the Maison Froment-Meurice design and workmanship. The auction listing shows a photo of the reverse with the clear maker’s mark of Froment-Meurice, although the auction description incorrectly states it was made by Stobbe. I illustrated both the obverse and reverse photos of this badge in my post of 14 January, 2019 on this thread. I included an image of the reverse of this badge as the 8th photo in my post of 28 February, 2019 discussing Egyptian hallmarks and manufacturer’s hallmarks on the Mixed Courts’ badges. The auction listing shows a photo of the reverse with the clear maker’s mark of Froment-Meurice, although the auction description incorrectly states it was made by Stobbe. The high-resolution image of the silver Mixed Courts badge attributed to Herbert A. Hills. I have illustrated this badge several times on this thread. Initially I included this image as the 1st illustration in my post of 24 March, 2017. I first illustrated the reverse with the note about it belonging to Judge Herbert Hills as the only photo in my post of 7 November 2017. In my post of 3 December, 2018 I used an enlarged & cropped portion of the inferior margin of the obverse of this badge as the 6th photo and the complete obverse view as the 8th image in a discussion of the iconography of the Mixed Courts badge. I included this image and one of the reverse as the 1st and 2nd photos in my discussion of Herbert Hitless career on 18 April, 2019. I included an enlarged cropped detail of the inferior portion of this badge as the 3rd photo of my post of 24 April, 2019 for comparison with the design of the Zivy Frère example. This image comes from a Dreweatts Bloomsbury Auctions listing for a June 2015 auction, Lot 175 (http://www.dreweatts.com/auctions/lot-details/?saleId=13863&lotId=175), that is no longer available, but is archived on the acsearch.info weboste (https://www.the-saleroom.com/en-gb/auction-catalogues/dreweatts/catalogue-id-drewea10199/lot-d2a1fe08-3bbf-4c29-a53d-a4aa00a27910).). The auction description only states that this badge was designed by Froment-Meurice. The handwritten note attached to the reverse covers any potential Froment-Meurice maker’s mark, but the workmanship makes that attribution most probable. This photo can be zoomed for additional design details. A high-resolution image of a Froment-Meurice manufactured silver Mixed Courts badge form a 19 June, 2019 auction by Lugdunum GmbH, Auction 16, Lot 288, that is archived on the CoinArchives.Com website (https://www.coinarchives.com/w/lotviewer.php?LotID=3972878&AucID=4100&Lot=288&Val=f97e5c722c28c73add7c029f374c845e). The reverse of this badge is marked with the Froment-Meurice diamond-shaped maker’s mark in addition to the name Froment-Meurice. I previously illustrated the obverse and reverse of this badge as the 1st and 2nd photos in my post of 14 August, 2019. This photo can be zoomed for additional design details. Another good resolution images of the obverse of Mixed Court badge that probably was made by Foment-Meurice. This badges is one I illustrated on 6 December, 2017 on this thread and comes from a Spink & Son auction of 4 December, 2017 that is archived on the saleroom.com website (https://www.the-saleroom.com/en-us/auction-catalogues/spink/catalogue-id-srspi10156/lot-63685e70-7557-48b1-aabf-a83200b99d8c). This high-resolution image shows what appears to be a gold and silver District Court judge’s badge. The auction description does not identify the maker of this badge (it claims that a pawnbroker’s mark is present on the reverse). This photo can be zoomed for additional design details. Rudolf Stobbe, Alexandria: A gold and silver District Court badge from the Mixed Courts of Egypt. This image has appeared on many internet sites, and I have included it in several postings on this thread discussing aspects of these badges. This badge was made by Rudolf Stobbe, and the reverse shows the Stobbe manufactureers’ mark. One thing I have not previously noted about this badge is that the central tablet is either loose or has slipped out of position towards the left (note the gap between the rays form the star and the left superior lobe of the tablet to see the offset). This image comes from a Baldwin’s auction listing of 10 December, 2014 (Lot 844) that is archived on the saleroom.com website (A gold and silver District Court badge from the Mixed Courts of Egypt. This image has appeared on many internet sites, and I have included it in several postings on this thread discussing aspects of these badges. This badge was made by Rudolf Stobbe, and the reverse shows the Stobbe manufacturers’ mark. One thing I have not previously noted about this badge is that the central tablet is either loose or has slipped out of position towards the left (note the gap between the rays form the star and the left superior lobe of the tablet to see the offset). This image comes from a Baldwin’s auction listing of 10 December, 2014 (Lot 844) that is archived on the saleroom.com website (https://www.the-saleroom.com/en-gb/auction-catalogues/baldwins/catalogue-id-srbal10006/lot-895754ae-9b9f-4f06-9d11-a3fe00ab0fe1).). The listing includes a photo of the reverse with the Stobbe maker’s mark, and the description correctly identifies the maker as Stobbe. I have previously illustrated the obverse and reverse of this badge as the 1st photo in my initial post on this thread on 17 November, 2016 (without the source information). I included that same image as the 6th photo in my post of 24 March, 2017, incorrectly stating it was an Appeals Court badge. On 4 April, 2017, I included this photo again to correct that error, identifying it as a District Court judge’s badge. High-resolution image of a silver Mixed Courts badge made by Stobbe. This image comes from a 15 May, 2018 auction by Fritz Rudolf Künker Gmb & Co., 2018 auction, archived on acsearch.info webiste (https://www.acsearch.info/search.html?id=4974323). I previously included the auction listing photo of the obverse and reverse of this badge as the 2nd photo, in my post of October 31, 2018 on this thread. I included an image of the reverse of this badge showing the Stobbe maker’s mark as the 16th photo of my post of 28 February, 2019 on this thread. I also included an enlarged and cropped version of the image of the Stobbe mark on the reverse of this badge as the 2nd photo in my post of 24 September, 2018. Wolf Horovitz, Alexandria: I have only encountered 2 images of Horovitz-made Mixed Courts badges. The one of a gold Appeals Court badge (the only example I have found pictures of that is an Appeals Court gold badge) is too low a resolution for inclusion here to compare design differences with the DNW badge in the 1st photo of this post. The other silver Horovitz badge, shown above, is from a past eBay auction (https://www.acsearch.info/search.html?id=4974323) of a cased badge. I previously illustrated the obverse of this badge as the 1st photo in my post of 1 December, 2018. The reverse showing the Horovitz maker’s mark is shown in the 2nd and especially the enlarged and cropped 6th photo of that post, and in the 18th – 21st photos and the 23rd photo of my post of 28 February, 2019 on this thread. The 22nd photo in the post of 28 February, 2019 shows the 3 Egyptian hallmarks on the reverse of this piece, the 23rd photo also shows the 2 Egyptian hallmarks on the tunic pin of this badge, and the 24th picture illustrates the W. Horovitz name and address inside the upper case lid. My post of 1, December, 2018 also shows the badge in its case (3rd photo), the case lid with the W. Horovitz name (4th photo), the medal bed of the case (5th photo), and an enlarged and cropped view of the inscribed tablet as the 7th photo in that post. I noted in the 1 December, 2018 post that the Horovitz badge exhibits less detailed workmanship than the Froment-Meurice or Stobbe Mixed Court badges. This photo can be zoomed for additional design details. M. Laurencin & Cie. Alexandria: The above low-resolution image is the only example I have encountered attributed to Laurencin & Cie. of Alexandria. This image comes from a November 2012 auction by La Galerie Numismatique (Lot 323), archived on the Sixbid.com website (https://www.sixbid.com/browse.html?auction=515&category=11656&lot=539484). I included this image as the 3rd-to-last photo in my post of 28 February, 2019 on this thread. The attribution comes only from the auction description that the case is marked “M. Laurencin & Cie, Alexandrie, Egypte”, no image of the name Laurencin & Cie. on the case is shown, nor is there an image of the reverse of this badge. The name Laurencin & Cie. has only appeared in my research as an agent of the jeweler Leon Kramer of Cairo, as shown in the L. Kramer advertisement I included as the 3rdillustration in my post of 8 December, 2019. The lack of detail in this image makes it difficult to assess the workmanship of this example. Zivy Frère & Cie., Alexandria: Obverse of a silver badge made by Zivy Frère of Alexandria. This moderate-resolution image is the only example I have found pictures of by this jeweler. It comes from an auction by Heritage Auctions (Lot 74177) of 24 April, 2019 (https://fineart.ha.com/itm/silver-smalls/an-egyptian-silver-magistrate-s-badge-from-the-reign-of-abbas-ii-egypt-circa-1900marks-unidentified-cipher-zivy-fr/a/5403-74177.s), that also is archived on the liveauctioneers.com website (https://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/70835139_74177-an-egyptian-silver-magistrate-s-badge-from-the-r). I included this image of the obverse as the 1st photo in my post of 24 April, 2019 on this thread. That post also includes images of the maker’s mark on the reverse of the badge as the 4th - 6th photos. The 2nd photo of my 24 April, 2019 post also shows an enlarged and cropped image of the inferior position of the badge, detailing the lower craftsmanship in the execution of the mantle interior and ermine tails, as well as the leaves of the 2 crossed branches. I especially included that enlarged view to illustrate the unusual omission of the crescent and star design element above the Order of Medjidie symbol (I included an enlarged and cropped version of the Herbert Hills badge to illustrate this difference. That post discusses several other design aspects of this badge that I feel are less expertly crafted than the Mixed Courts badges by other manufacturers.
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