Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 17/08/21 in all areas

  1. @David M The man with Prinz Joachim is Major Siegfried Graf zu Eulenburg - Regimentskommandeure of the 1. Garde-Regiment zu Fuß from the 6th of November 1916 to the 11th of December 1918
    3 points
  2. This seems to be a misunderstanding. Actually only 0.95% of the German population was Jewish (in 1912). 17,3 % of the Jewish population was found to serve in the German army.
    3 points
  3. Just got this medal bar in to complete my humble grouping. Thoughts?
    2 points
  4. A little bit I would like to add is, von Wedel was also one of just 21 people awarded the Oldenburg Einnerungsmedaille 1870/71
    2 points
  5. Bonjour, There were other uniforms too. This is coming from an article in L'Illustration, published 24 June 1905 under the title "Le Péril Jaune". It places the officers as follows : "Seven Chinese Officers, who have already spent 4 years in the Wou-Chang Military Academy, started serving in Germany. 3 are attached to Field Artillery, garrisoned at Wesel, 3 other ones in a Regiment of Hussars, in Düsseldorf, and the last one in the Engineers, at Deutz." The Kürassier looks like the left one of the Hussars ? Cdlt, Jérôme
    2 points
  6. Hello Andreas, yes, he is the former Hannoverian Kronprinz Dragoner officer. He had two Patents as a Premier-Lieutenant, the earlier from Hannover and then the November 1866 seniority once incorporated into the Prussian army. He was indeed initially assigned to HR 8 in 1867 and did not enter 2. GUR until 1887 as its commander. Please find below his entry from Kleist's "Die Generale der Königlich Preußischen Armee von 1840-1890". See also his entry in the Militär-Wochenblatt (Annex to Issue 11 of 16 March 1867, page 13) Regards Glenn
    2 points
  7. Here's a stark reminder to all you experts chiming in on this topic: Willi Geile, George Seymour, and Rick Lundstrom... three towering figures in phaleristics and recognized geniuses in this field... all examined this bar, yet none of them ever raised concerns about its authenticity. In fact, based on posts at the beginning of this thread, George S and Rick L spent quite a bit of time doing research in an effort to I-D the owner. They do not strike me as people who would have wasted serious time and energy researching a bogus bar. What seems to be happening here is a phenomenon trending in many online forums. When the big fish and quasi experts with massive egos and 'infallible' knowledge can't come up with an answer, they declare that the problem must lie with the artifact and begin picking it apart... it must be defective... it must be fake... a frankenstein, for sure. In stark contrast, Rick L appears to have been a person of integrity and character... a genuine straight-shooter. He freely conceded that he and George S were stumped and didn't resort to blaming it on 'deficiencies' associated with the bar. I'm sure all of you will excuse me if I go with him on this one.
    2 points
  8. Most likely because it is a WW2 medalbar whereas you are in a forum aimed at German states (which ends in 1918 with some notable exceptions, such as the exile-pieces already mentioned). Not to mention the fact that the question regarding your medalbar is posted in a thread which has an active discussion on a different medalbar. Wondering whether a medalbar is a 'Frankenstein' is justified in my opinion when ample evidence is given, as @91-old-inf-reg does. He gives us four (solid in my opinion) indications that something might be wrong. There is ofcourse the possibility that the bar is genuine and that he is mistaken. It is merely a continuation of the discussion which might lead to different perspectives on the piece. Here too I have to disagree, silver-gilt in Prussian decorations usually points us at a post-1916 production date, which given the decorations (starting off in 1870, which means the recipient was born in or before 1852) could illicite suspicion regarding the pieces. @Komtur points us at the possibility that the HoH is either a post-1918 exile-production or a private-purchase piece. Simply because it is silver-gilt does not mean that it is private-purchase. There are official pieces made in silver-gilt and private-purchase pieces made in gold. The material alone is not enough to base a conclusion on. The conclusion was made based on the material and the quality. Is medalbar a Frankenstein-piece? I don't know. There are some things about this bar that assure me that is genuine whereas some other features make me frown. There is not enough 'wrong' to consider it fake or an amalgamation, but there is also not enough 'right' for me to consider it genuine (at this point). It is a civilian bar and those are always tricky. They are incredibly hard to identify (those who can are masters in their art, hence the reason we call them wizards sometimes) and there was much less control regarding the right way of wearing decorations. The little missing red cross on the second KO4 could be damage. Someone could have left out the bow on the RAO3Kr. Perhaps the HoH is a private-purchase or exile-piece. Lots of 'if' which can only be solved through discussion and the meeting of minds. Kind regards, Laurentius
    2 points
  9. Here is an original ex-libris in drypoint style for the private books for Karl von Müller, featuring the Emden, signed by the artist Kallmorgen, a reknown German painter, from my collection. GreyC
    2 points
  10. I have both 1906 and 1907 and Hullström has the Verdienstkreuz in both of them. Hullström was forrester in Örbyhus which was owned by the von Rosen family so perhaps the Waldeck's was visiting and hunting on the estate? Another interesting thing is that Hullström lived in the town of Marma, in a house called "Villa Waldeck". So there is some kind of connection there. Here is a picture of Hullström.
    2 points
  11. 2 points
  12. Hi, antisemitism in the Prussian/German army was a fact. The link below leads to a summary on the antisemetic stance of politicians and the German military towards the German Jewish population. The German military conducted a statistical survey in 1916 to determine how many Jews were serving in the Imperial army: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judenzählung 17,3 % of the German population was Jewish and over all the same percentage was found to serve in the German army. So there was no reason to blame Jews for being cowards or the like. HOWEVER: According to military historian Christian Stachelbeck there were 51 000 active officers and 226 000 reserve officers in the German army. So 277.000 total. As far as I know there were only 2000 Jewish military officers in the imperial army (besides roughly 12.000 medical doctors, pharmacists, Militär-Beamte with officers rank according to WIKIPEDIA, if these numbers hold. According to an article in the Spiegel even only 3000 officers, doctors and Militärbeamte). Now I don´t call that many, not even proportionate, even if you add the doctors etc. and go with the higher WIKIPEDIA numbers. The facts show: although the German Jews were proportionally represented in the German army, the percentage of Jewish officers was well below of what could or should have been. Major der Artillerie Meno Burg was the only Stabsoffizier (Major or higher) in the Prussian army during the 19th century. According to the Spiegel, from 1885 on there were no jewish Reserveoffiziere in the Prussian army until the start of the war. https://www.spiegel.de/geschichte/juedische-soldaten-in-deutschen-armeen-grausame-taeuschung-a-946547.html And this, although from 1880 to 1909 between 25.000-30.000 Jews served in the military as Einjährige, who overwhelmingly ended up as Reserveoffiziere - normally. https://www.grin.com/document/430851 Only in 1914 were Jews allowed to become officers due to the strains the war put onto the German officer´s corps. So it is not doubtful, that he was not allowed to be promoted to officer status. Until 1914 it was against the regulations of the army! So what your grandfather might have experienced is not the rule, the officers in his regiment must have been promoted after 1914 and if there were many, it was not the norm. GreyC
    2 points
  13. Lt Fraedrich was from IR 155 and from Ostrowo. Olt aD as per EhrenRL. From Posener Tageblatt, 8.7.1918 The Adressbuch Ostrowo 1913 lists a Hermann Fraedrich, Oberzollrevisor, probably his father.
    2 points
  14. Here I send you what I have from Karl Heinrich von Hänisch ??.01.1905 Russ. St. Annen Orden II. Klasse 21.01.1906 Roter Adler Orden III. Klasse mit der Schleife ??.02.1908 Komturkreuz II. Klasse des hzgl. sachs.-ernestin. Haus-Ordens ??.10.1908 Kgl. Krone zum Roten Adler Orden III. Klasse mit der Schleife 01.06.1910 Kgl. Kronen Orden II. Klasse 01.06.1912 Roter Adler Orden II. Klasse mit Eichenlaub ??.09.1913 Großkreuz des hzgl. sachs.-ernestin. Haus-Ordens ??.04.1914 Bayer. Militär-Verdienst-Orden II. Klasse mit dem Stern Eisernes Kreuz II. Klasse Eisernes Kreuz I. Klasse 12.08.1916 Stern zum Roten Adler Orden II. Klasse mit Eichenlaub und Schwertern 10.05.1917 Verdienstkreuz für Kriegshilfe
    1 point
  15. @1812 OvertureThe reason he was awarded the Austrian Maltese Order was because, as evident by IR 91’s commander, Ernst von Höhnhorst, and his adjutant, Gert von Pflugradt both being awarded the Austrian Militarverdienstkreuz. Austria awarded many decorations to many German soldiers and officers that fought with them, and this man, who was ostensibly a Catholic, was awarded the Austrian Maltese Order during his time fighting in Galicia and part of Romania during the war.
    1 point
  16. Moin, hier mal die Offiziere vom IR 75, die laut RG den Hohenzollern bekommen haben: GreyC
    1 point
  17. Here is another example of a Whitechapel Policemen who might have been in attendance at the Sidney Street Siege. PC Edgar Greenacre was awarding the Metropolitan Police Queen Victoria Jubilee medal for 1897, Metropolitan Police Coronation medals for 1902 and 1911. Police Constable Edgar E Greenacre who joined the Metropolitan Police on the 10/3/1890 and was assigned to Southwark or 'M' division, warrant number 75404. Awarded the Jubilee medal for 1897 whilst serving with Southwark or 'M' division. Sometime between the last half of 1897 and the first half of 1902, PC Edgar E Greenacre transferred to Whitechapel or 'H' division. Awarded the Coronation medal for 1902 whilst serving with Whitechapel or 'H' division. Awarded the Coronation medal for 1911 whilst serving with Whitechapel or 'H' division. 1911......Sidney Street Siege.......was he there? 20/12/1920 Police Constable Edgar E Greenacre retires on pension from Whitechapel or 'H' division and the Metropolitan Police and in his pension records we find the following information :- When PC Edgar Greenacre retired from the Metropolitan Police on the 20/12/1920, he was on 'Special Duties' attached to the 'Tower of London' and it was paid for by the 'Office of Works.' This is confirmed in his pension records. Special Duties are only recorded on the Metropolitan Police pension records when the individual was still employed on them at the time of leaving the police. This special duty fell within Whitechapel or 'H' division's responsibility since it was within the divisional area. Because special duties are only recorded on the pension records when the individual is still activity on them at the time of his retirement......this means they are harder to fine and evidence.
    1 point
  18. She is an incredible ship and we are very proud to have her open to the public. Her history is amazing not just because of her role in the Span Am but also in World War, the Spanish Flu epidemic, service during the Russian Revolution and carrying the Unknown Soldier. She also tested our rudimentary underwater detection gear for the Navy!!! https://www.washingtonpost.com/history/2021/04/30/unknown-soldier-arlington-uss-olympia/
    1 point
  19. Hi Andreas, I have seen nothing to suggest that he was ever promoted to Oberst. He is still shown in the "Liste der verabschiedeten, Generale, Stabsoffiziere und Hauptleute der Königl. Preuss. Armee" of 1913 as an Oberstleutnant a.D. Regards Glenn
    1 point
  20. Hello Gentlemen, Here an actual photo of Hero National of Angola The one of 1st President of Angola Agostinho Neto Regards to all. Emmanuel
    1 point
  21. He was awarded: 21.08.1913 Orden der Eisernen Krone 1. klasse 25.11.1916 Grosskreuz des Leopold-Ordens mit der kreisgsdekoration 25.05.1917 Schwerter zum Militarverdienstkreuz 1. klasse 27.10.1917 Kommandeurkreuz des Militar-Maria-Theresien-Ordens (posthum) 27.10.1917 Grosskreuz des Leopold-Ordens, jeweils mit der kreisgsdekoration (posthum)
    1 point
  22. Hello , The Peruvian Air Force adopted around 1939 Italian M 1933 steel helmets for use of the ground personnel and AA servers . The Army for their side weared Adrian Helmets . The Peruvian helmets carried on the front a radiant sun of about 60 mm of diameter . the colour of the Air force helmets was grey blue
    1 point
  23. He received the different classes of the Swedish order of the Sword as below: Grand cross - June 6h 1908 Commander 1st class - May 9th 1899 Commander 2nd class - December 19th 1893 He received the Danish Dannebrog-orden commander 2nd class November 30th 1891.
    1 point
  24. Czech police is awarding this badge.
    1 point
  25. Hi, That proves my point. This collector either upgraded some of his EKs, or is trimming, or reshaping his collection as all we do from time to time It is not bad EK1 and if the prize is right keep it till you like it or better one comes along Cheers
    1 point
  26. Hi Stuka f Then you have to dig deep into the railway archives ..and with a bit luck and a bit hard research you can get the person, The information from the dedicated Belgium friends fellow collectors can help Cheers
    1 point
  27. After a ten year hiatus I've been to the Zollern yesterday, and it was as great as you can imagine! The exhibition saw some changes since Claudio shot this pictures in 2013, and I really couldn't dare to do some new ones, but there is some good news: Due to the current Covid19 situation, there are no group tours now. Instead, you are free to move around at your own pace in what they call "Royal Castle Stroll" or "Königliches Flanieren" in German! For an average visitor, this might be some drawback, but I couldn't be happier to have enough time for a close look at the displayed orders and decorations of Wilhelm I, Wilhelm II and Auguste Victoria. And again, and again... my friends, who are not really into awards were pretty patient as well, luckily. One sad thing however: Some of the attributions cannot be correct, like a Prussian Royal Crown Order 2nd class cross attributed to Kaiser Wilhelm II, or the same with diamonds to his wife Kaiserin Auguste Victoria?! Also, some descriptions had major flaws, with several awards allegedly being made from cast iron instead of the stamped bronze or zinc they actually are. Well, awards are definitely not their main competence... still absolutely worth every visit, if you have a chance!
    1 point
  28. 11 January 1856. Regards Glenn
    1 point
  29. The MVK was introduced in 1849 and it was instituted with the "war" ribbon even for peacetime and wartime service. The war decoration was instituted in 1860 and the ribbon was still the same for both. There was never another ribbon for the imperial MVK. Regards Christian
    1 point
  30. Hello Valter , The subject of the origins ,migration and mixing of Peoples is very interesting and complex . I am glad that you understands my point of view ,Kind regards
    1 point
  31. 1 point
  32. I think in the case of Wolff his age played the major factor in his being denied anything, and a testament to his willpower was his military CV. And Imperial Germany was certainly not the only country which had widespread anti-Jewish feelings, you need go no further than France or England to find such sentiments.
    1 point
  33. Yes, sitting on the stairs is a young Hermann Göring! The Hamburger Cigarren Handels AG (HACIFA) had merged with his fathers, now brothers L.Wolff Cigarrenfabriken. As an AG the company still existed 1945 (see first picture) and 1954, around 1960 it became the HACIFA Hamburger Cigarren Handels G.m.b.H., which still existed 1965 (see second picture).
    1 point
  34. It is the White Russian Order of St. Anne with Swords 1st class given to him by Count Bermondt-Avalov for his Freikorp's breakthrough and relief of the Eiserne Division/West Russian Volunteer Army (Russische Westarmee) which was surrounded by Latvian troops in November 1919 during the Baltic Campaign. Sturmabteilung Rossbach force marched 1200 miles from Berlin to Thorensburg, Latvia to save the Eiserne Division/West Russian Volunteer Army from certain destruction.
    1 point
  35. jaobr, Interesting cap. The cap badge doesn't seem to be in the correct place. Too far forward but I am not an expert on these caps as worn by the Helleinic Air Force. The badge appears to be correct. I wore one of these caps for years in the RCAF and the badge is usually further from the front. The same as in the RAF. See attached pictures. I would be interested in seeing a picture of the buttons. Regards, Gordon
    1 point
  36. That medal bar is interesting, especially the placement of the Rettungsmedaille ahead of the RAO4Kr.
    1 point
  37. Another very nice item to add to your collection, never seen one for Newport before, thanks for posting. Regards Simon.
    1 point
  38. An amazing find, John. Congratulations! I hope that the missing WWI pair turn up. Regards Brett
    1 point
  39. Hola Malfeasant, bienvenido! The shown patch is one of the first patches of the Policía Nacional Revolucionaria. That's why PNR is standing above the coat of arms. Unterneath of it stands "Cuba". The another two words I can't read, but I suppose there is written Comandancia General (main headquarters). This patches were used until the end of the 1960s. Is it possible to show the uniform? Here you can see the (it's of my collection):
    1 point
  40. Hi, yup, I knew him for 3-4 years. When i get it finalised I will post close ups :-)
    1 point
  41. And the day before retirement in 2008. Hallelujah !!
    1 point
  42. John, Thank you for showing us your two 617 Squadron groups, what a fine research and description you did. Best regards Eric-Jan
    1 point
  43. What a focused collection. Is that African medal for a South African soldier? I did not know that the British had a special medal for the region.
    1 point
  44. Here is another.... You have the letter informing you of the award right from the Korps commander... is someone going to give you a document from a lower level confirming that? http://gmic.co.uk/index.php?showtopic=15621&hl=langemak
    1 point
  45. Hi Chris, for which decoration is the question, for the EK or for the Braunschweig decoration? - Prussia EK 1st class (... das Eiserne Kreuz 1. Klasse...) I think, that his EK 1st class is not the first decoration, there must be the EK 2nd class before that date. And I believe, that the paper for the EK is not the award document, it is the "?bersendungsschreiben", the "consignment" document. - Brunswick Kriegsverdienstkreuz 2nd class The 1st class is for repeated awards for front-line soldiers. Regards Uwe
    1 point
This leaderboard is set to London/GMT+01:00
  • Newsletter

    Want to keep up to date with all our latest news and information?
    Sign Up
×
×
  • Create New...