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Gentleman's Military Interest Club

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Showing content with the highest reputation on 18/04/12 in all areas

  1. I don't know if this is a good idea or not, but I got to thinking about this the other day when cataloging my tinnies, my first one is REICHSVERBAND PFORZHEIM No 21
    1 point
  2. I need to learn more about medals. ps1991 by joerookery, on Flickr
    1 point
  3. I have another confession....i also have a real weakness for bars which include the good old Prussian Kriegshilfdienst Kreuz....I know, they're ugly and made from zinc, but they hold a real appeal for me :)
    1 point
  4. Tim, Indeed, the L1 centers had no pins and when clay becomes 'disturbed' it can rotate but not separate. They literally placed the piece with reverse center disk down - flat on the special form (to perfectly accept the Order) and using a little ladle scooped the hot clay and poured into the center part. Top (usually obverse) center disk was previously 'given' just a bit of clay in the middle and when clay was still hot - voila - they stuck it right onto the center with still hot clay. 10 seconds later - all was set and ready to be ribboned. I got to see this procedure many times. My uncle
    1 point
  5. Rick, This "gum" substance is jeweler's setting clay. Each company had their own recipe for that and it ranges in colour from white, through reds, pinks and browns into almost black. This special grade clay, mixed with additives was being kept hot in a crucible (bubbling - so to speak) but not burning. When poured into 'cavity' of the order being assembled this setting agent would go hard in matter of 10 seconds or so. If person failed to place the covering center exactly in the middle - this would end up 'off-center'. If it was not too much off - it was often accepted and delivered that way.
    1 point
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