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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/09/21 in all areas

  1. Here is another example of a Whitechapel Policemen who might have been in attendance at the Sidney Street Siege. PC Edgar Greenacre was awarding the Metropolitan Police Queen Victoria Jubilee medal for 1897, Metropolitan Police Coronation medals for 1902 and 1911. Police Constable Edgar E Greenacre who joined the Metropolitan Police on the 10/3/1890 and was assigned to Southwark or 'M' division, warrant number 75404. Awarded the Jubilee medal for 1897 whilst serving with Southwark or 'M' division. Sometime between the last half of 1897 and the first half of 1902, PC Edgar E Greenacre transferred to Whitechapel or 'H' division. Awarded the Coronation medal for 1902 whilst serving with Whitechapel or 'H' division. Awarded the Coronation medal for 1911 whilst serving with Whitechapel or 'H' division. 1911......Sidney Street Siege.......was he there? 20/12/1920 Police Constable Edgar E Greenacre retires on pension from Whitechapel or 'H' division and the Metropolitan Police and in his pension records we find the following information :- When PC Edgar Greenacre retired from the Metropolitan Police on the 20/12/1920, he was on 'Special Duties' attached to the 'Tower of London' and it was paid for by the 'Office of Works.' This is confirmed in his pension records. Special Duties are only recorded on the Metropolitan Police pension records when the individual was still employed on them at the time of leaving the police. This special duty fell within Whitechapel or 'H' division's responsibility since it was within the divisional area. Because special duties are only recorded on the pension records when the individual is still activity on them at the time of his retirement......this means they are harder to fine and evidence.
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  2. I have only read one book on the subject of the 'Houndsditch Murders and the Sidney Street Siege' and that was 'The Battle of Stepney by Colin Rogers' and I read that several years ago. But there is a short paragraph which I think helps imagine what it was like for Detectives, like Detective Constable James Amos'.......remembering the original murders were committed on the 16th of December in 1910. '''''All City Police Christmas Festivities had been abandoned and all leave for the force's hundred-odd detectives cancelled. Not one was at home for his Christmas Dinner. Marathon spells of duty remained commonplace; food was snatched or gone without. With the holiday freedom of London's other citizens and the substantial reward on offer, hundreds of hours were spent investigating alleged suspicious characters. The uniformed branch also had its troubles; the two Bank Holidays which followed Christmas Day brought thousands of sightseers into the Exchange Buildings neighbourhood.'''''
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  3. Thanks for the information dpk and I had a quick look on the ''OMRS'' site and it is extremely interesting. Hi Gordon - Since you are evidencing the photographs together with his detailed service with Whitechapel or 'H' division, during this period, I think the chances of this being the same person are reasonable/good but the chances of him having attended Sidney Street Siege are even better. I would suspect of the 200 City and Metropolitan Police that initially attended Sidney Street, the greatest percentage of that number would have come from Whitechapel or 'H' division. I don't know what Whitechapel or 'H' divisions uniformed establishment was in 1911 but it could easily mean a quarter of the entire division's men attended the siege. I believe further reinforcements were requested later as the siege progressed but I am sure these would have been supplied by the other divisions nearby. I believe I read somewhere that initially shotguns were given to Policemen that had served in the military but I am also sure they would have been issued to Policemen who had fired and had experience with shotguns ie those from estates and from the countryside. Anyway it is an interesting question - what was the total percentage of manpower supplied by Whitechapel or 'H' division. I remember reading the City of London Police had to commit 100 police officers to secure the ''Exchange Buildings,'' location after the Latvians anarchists/revolutionaries killed the 3 City Policemen.
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  4. Hello All, I have in my collection 3 different PLS&GC medal obverses- GVI crowned head "Britt Omn Rex Fid Def", QEII crowned head "D.G. Br. Omn" and QEII crowned head "Dei Gratia". I think that is the full set of obverse types but happy to learn more! The GVI is cupro nickel, the QEII "D.G. Br. Omn' is cupro nickel, the QEII "Dei Gratia" is rhodium plated. I think there may also be a QEII "Dei Gratia" in cupro nickel??
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  5. Not only the medals changed over time ..................... the cap badges got bigger and better too !!
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  6. And the day before retirement in 2008. Hallelujah !!
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  7. Feeling the pressure as a Chief Inspector around 2005 .................
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  8. Yours truly as an innocent young Sergeant in 1987 ....................
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  9. Family tradition ....................... grandfather, father and son.
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  10. Grandfather in his later days .................
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  11. My grandfather in his early police days, not long after the end of the First World War, where he was severely wounded at the Battle of Arras in 1917 ....................
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  12. My grandfather's medals ..............................
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  13. And shown beside my private purchase 'wearing' copies on the right .................................. of poorer quality.
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  14. Mine .......................................
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  15. Rhodium plating shines like a mirror. I was awarded mine in 2000 and it still looks as good as the day it was presented ................... no tarnishing at all. Rhodium plating was also used on the rims of the 1939 Iron Cross !! As a point of interest, my grandfather was awarded the GVIR medal when it was instituted and my father was awarded the EIIR medal in 1975. Both are in unplated nickel silver. So the rhodium plating seems to have been introduced well into the present Queen's reign. I would guess not long before the year 2000. The GVIR medal is MUCH rarer than the EIIR one, so should be worth a lot more, IMHO. I suppose Police medals in general just aren't in that much demand by collectors these days.
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