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  1. Option A or Option B What you are about to read you may find disturbing or even offensive. If you do then you need to grow up. The permanency of life is an illusion and you cannot afford to delude yourself to thinking you are immortal. Therefore, if you have elected to read on, you have been duly warned and I will make no apologies if you find your delicate feelings have been hurt. Jim [not his real name] was 6 foot 2 inches tall, a big guy but not such as you would say was overweight at all. Age had left him, as it does most of us, a little soft in the midsection. This was just about all that was soft about Jim. He had the weathered look of someone who had worked hard out in the elements; a grizzled beard peppered with gray and a gruff personality pretty well summed up what Jim looked like. To most of the office staff he was a scary fellow best avoided and this had not changed since he became Zone Officer and was now stationed in head office. Others, like me, who have been seasoned by years of working in the field recognized a kindred spirit and fully appreciated his dark sense of humour. Jim had been with the Authority for 31 years and had become part of the corporate landscape. Late in 2011, after feeling unwell for a period of time, he made a rare appointment with his doctor. At 59 years of age he was told, after a battery of tests that he had prostate cancer, and worse it had spread to his bones and was now throughout his body. Jim knew his chances were extremely slim to none, with “none” being the odds on favour. He also knew what lay ahead of him with the proposed radiation and chemotherapy followed by what would most likely be a long agonizing death filled with unimaginable pain and suffering, held at bay for a while with massive amounts of drugs. In the end he knew he would be in a vegetative state out of touched with the world and loved ones only to finally die in a haze of confusion and pain. He was aware that his family and friends would be put through their own form of suffering as he slowly wasted away. It was time for Jim to weight his options. Option A: To go through the torture and suffering ahead knowing full well that death awaited him in the end, or Option B. Early this week Jim made his choice and took his own life. I cannot judge Jim’s choice of Option B, even though I have fought and won two battles against cancer, as I have never stood at the threshold of the great unknown and had to make that fateful decision. I only wish he had chosen to have had a simple prostate examination a few years ago. If he had I would not likely be writing this missive today. Rest in Peace old buddy. Now, my friend, it is your time to make a decision. If you have not already done so, make an appointment with your doctor and set up a prostate exam. Otherwise you may have to make the choice of, Option A or....Option B. Respectfully Brian
    10 points
  2. I think your reaction is out of line and childish to say the least. Simius Rex was being very respectful and only trying to help. Is it really "too inaccessible, too elitist and too semantic" to try to be historically accurate? That is the raison d'etre for forums like this to exist. You obviously showed this bar hoping for a fawning "ooh, aah" reaction from other members. When you didn't get it and your lack of basic knowledge was quickly exposed, you made the absolutely inane and silly response of "I collect medals, not ribbons". (What medal collector doesn't collect ribbons?). If you're intent on leaving the forum after only 41 posts because you can't accept the truth, while unfortunate, it's no great loss to any of us. Obviously, based on your reaction, you're not interested in history but only in accumulating shiny things like some magpie.
    6 points
  3. Afghan Order of Glory, established in 1982 and abolished ten years later. Regards
    5 points
  4. The explanation for the rough finish of the MVK2 that started the thread is not that it was immersed in water. The explanation was provided in my two postings above along with relevant photographs of other crosses that fall into the same classification... namely, Gussfertigungen aus Geschützbronze (cast crosses made from captured enemy artillery pieces.) As stated, these genuine, period-original, CAST crosses range from mediocre looking to crappy looking. But they are 100% original to the period. I don't know why I bother writing anything in my posts because some people simply look at the pretty pictures but don't take the time to read what the pictures represent.
    5 points
  5. 5 points
  6. It was gently pointed out to me that I was on the verge of hijacking somebody else's thread by posting some of my own material for review. Therefore, I am starting a new thread with a very specific focus. Mr. Daniel Krause in another thread brilliantly researched and identified a potential owner of one of my bars for which I am eternally grateful. In conjunction with my bar, he mentioned a fashion-trend among German officers involving ribbon-bars featuring a limited assortment of decorations. I first heard about this from an old German collector many many years ago, but I completely forgot about it until now. Apparently, some highly decorated officers with many awards had ribbon-bars created with a limited assortment of decorations. This makes reasearching these bars very difficult and confusing! I have at least one such ribbon bar in my collection. It baffled me for many years. There is a KO with X but no colonial ribbon. There is no long service award. There are no peacetime decorations. Experienced collectors who saw it believed it might be a fantasy item. Then, a very knowledgable Wuerttemberg collector sent me a photo of the owner wearing this exact same bar. This officer selected only his Kriegsauszeuchnungen to wear on his battlefield tunic. I am hoping others in the forum might show their "abreviated" bars to make this an interesting thread. Best Regards.
    4 points
  7. Nice examples shown so far Here's one from my own collection: these are the Kleinmann bars; the short one must have been one of his first bars and the double row set probably the last from ww2. Now we add in some photo's (cropped and zoomed in): these are some of the iterations he went through, starting with ribbons through a buttonhole and later changing to ribbon bars. Since there also is a 4 place ribbon bar with foreign awards -the one in the photo only shows German awards- somewhere in between the iterations he changed ribbon bars and only later combined his German and foreign awards into a longer bar. If there is an interest in the full photo's I can post these, and his other ww1 photo's (10 in total), in this or another thread. Best. Peter PS the longest Georg Veit bar is in my collection, but it's o.k. to show 👍
    4 points
  8. Came across this photo and I thought no better time than the present to add it!
    4 points
  9. Hi everybody After many years of research, I have found all medals to go with this nice medal bar. Christophe
    4 points
  10. Dear all, I just found a bigger brother bar to the bar that has been originally posted in this thread, please see the photo's. I received the bar today. This bar took me more than 6 month's to acquire, a relieve it finally arrived. If it wasn't for this thread I would never have thought this was a viable and original combination so kudo's to the original poster I've also dug up and added Veit's entry in the 1914 rank list. Amazingly he is already listed with having received 12 awards by 1914 🙀
    4 points
  11. Here you are: Oberst Walter von Conrady, - very limited - limited - full Have some more examples, but this is quite "extreme". Best, Daniel
    4 points
  12. HI Another example. Here is Oberst Bernhard von Süßmilch from IR 139. In the first photo he is wearing his big medal bar for officiel photo. Here is ribbon bar. On the second photo, the same officer has chosen to wear only its wartime medals. Even if they received a lot of medals before the war, for those kind of officers the real medals are the wartime medals Christophe
    4 points
  13. Lifesaving medals are something really special and among, if not the most distinctive awards - each medal a life saved from greatest danger... you cannot say the same about many other awards! So, despite we have already seen a Bavarian here some thirteen years ago, I'm bumping this thread up with another one, single mounted, that will be in my shop's update tomorrow. Looking their history up, I noticed two things that are most unusual and worth mentioning: Despite their monarchistic design, these were handed out until the early 30s, when they were superseded by a very short lived and thus ultra rare Freistaat type. The other remarkable thing about them: They could be awarded several times to the same person. Not in silver and gold - just silver, exact same ones, as many as you deserved, side by side! In fact, two persons won the medal twice, but no one had more than two.
    4 points
  14. Old thread, I know.... Quite often, when I come across something, I think, Rick would love to see it.... This photo came to me recently. Legendary triple lifesaver Lt. Wittmer Best, Daniel
    4 points
  15. The replies above have identified the typical ways a Landesorden was awarded. Practice varied from state to state, especially with regard to which award one might get, and the criteria changed during the war. Braunschweig, for instance, initially only awarded the Kriegsverdienstkreuz on the blue-yellow ribbon if you served at the front or in the Kriegsschauplatz, with awards on the yellow-blue ribbon for merit on the homefront. Eventually, Braunschweig changed this to follow Prussia's practice, where military personnel in the Heimat could receive the Iron Cross on the black-white ribbon. So, early in the war, someone stationed at the stellv. Generalkommando in Hannover or at the Kriegsministerium in Berlin might receive a "combatant" Iron Cross but a "non-combatant" Kriegsverdienstkreuz. With the change in policy, they could return their ribbon and Urkunde to Braunschweig and receive a new blue-yellow ribbon and Urkunde. However, you had to apply yourself; the authorities did not automatically issue new ribbons and documents. Therefore you can still see "combatant" EK2/"non-combatant" BrK2 medal bars if the recipient never bothered to apply. Braunschweig was much stricter with the Bewährungsabzeichen. It routinely denied the device to recipients of the Kriegsverdienstkreuz who were not Braunschweigers or serving in Braunschweig units. By contrast, when it was created, the Kriegsverdienstkreuz 1. Klasse was awarded if the recipient could show he was already in possession of the Kriegsverdienstkreuz 2. Klasse and had received the Eisernes Kreuz 1. Klasse. To summarize, the most common ways to receive a Landesorden were: 1. Be a native of the state. However, this was often not enough. Many states such as Reuß denied awards to people born in the state but who had left the state. So, if you were born in Greiz, but your family moved to Saxony when you were a child, you might be denied. If you were born and raised in Greiz, but left as an adult and spent the majority of your economic life outside Reuß, you were denied. But if you left Reuß for reasons outside of your control, such as active military or civil service, you could still get the award. The Kingdoms who had some military autonomy from Prussia were fairly strict in this regard. A native Bavarian or Saxon who served in the Prussian Army would not likely receive a Bavarian or Saxon award, unlike a native Badener in the Prussian Army, even when the Badener served in non-Baden units. 2. Serve in that state's contingent, or its wartime daughter formations (Tochterformationen). These ranged in peacetime from the multi-corps Bavarian Army down to the battalion-sized contingents of Schaumburg-Lippe and Waldeck. Many wartime units were not officially established as state formations, but as daughters of their parent formations were considered essentially as so. Thus RJB 7 and RJB 20 were Schaumburg units, RIR 90 and RIR 214 were Mecklenburg regiments, etc. Also, a number of Prussian regiments and formations, while not officially state contingents, were considered as effectively connected to particular states. For example, the Minden-based Prussian regiments IR 15 and FAR 58 recruited from Schaumburg-Lippe as well as Prussian Westphalia, and Schaumburg-Lippe routinely awarded decorations to men in these units and their daughter formations. FR 36 was a Prussian regiment, but one of its battalions was based in Bernburg, so Anhalt awards were common to this unit as well as RIR 36 (Tochterformation of FR 36 and IR 93) and LIR 36. JRzP 5 was a Prussian regiment based in Alsace, but it was part of Baden's XIV.Armeekorps, so Baden awards were common to that regiment. I would say this was more common for officers than NCOs and men. A Prussian-born Musketier in IR 93 could expect to be put in for a Friedrichkreuz simply by being in the regiment, but a Füsilier in FR 36 would usually need to be an Anhaltiner. However, a Hauptmann in FR 36 might get the Friedrichkreuz by virtue of being the commander of a sufficient number of Anhalt Landeskinder. Though this could happen with any unit with a bunch of Landeskinder. As BlackcowboyBS notes with Braunschweig, an officer might nominate some of his Braunschweigers for an award, and find himself nominated as well. 3. Serve in a regiment whose Chef or Inhaber was the sovereign of another state. In Duke Ernst August's old regiment, HR 3, to which he was à la suite, at least 115 officers received the Kriegsverdienstkreuz 2. Klasse and at least 32 the 1. Klasse. Grand Duke Wilhelm Ernst was Chef of HR 12 and the Saxon Karabinier-Regiment, and the White Falcon and other Sachsen-Weimar awards were common in those regiments. Officers and men of the 2.GUR often received Saxon awards, those of the 3.GUR Waldeck awards, and those of the 1.GDR Oldenburg and Saxon awards (there is correspondence in the archives in Dessau where Prinz Aribert tells the Duke that Oldenburg has awarded a bunch of its crosses to 1.GDR, and Anhalt needs to follow suite). In GGR 2, the Emperor of Austria-Hungary was the Chef and the Duke of Sachsen-Meiningen was à la suite. Wartime awards of the Ehrenzeichen für Verdienst im Kriege were common, and many GGR 2 officers had more peacetime and wartime Austrian awards than anything else, in some cases more than many Austrians had. Sachsen-Meiningen's Ehrenzeichen für Verdienst im Kriege, both cross and medal, was also routinely awarded to officers and men of GR 10, whose Chef was the Duke, and GR 11, whose Chef was the Duchess (and sister to the Kaiser), as well as Saxon IR 133. Other examples include Mecklenburg-Schwerin awards to LGR 8, IR 24 and 21.bay.IR, Bavarian awards to IR 47, IR 102 and LKR 1, Württemberg awards to KR 5, IR 105 and 4.bay.IR, Austro-Hungarian awards to 13.bay.IR, FR 122, HR 16 and UR 17, Bulgarian awards to IR 72, Baden awards to IR 103, IR 126 and 8.bay.IR, Hessen-Darmstadt awards to IR 17 and 5.bay.IR, Braunschweig awards to 1.bay.SchwRR and LHR 2 (whose Chef was Ernst August's wife and the Kaiser's daughter), Reuß awards to the LGHR, JB 4 and JB 13, and Schaumburg-Lippe awards to HR 7. HR 14 received more Schaumburg-Lippe awards than HR 7, but that is because Fürst Adolf was merely à la suite to HR 7, while he actually commanded HR 14. Those are the three main ways to receive a Landesorden. As Chris noted, there were also a lot of random awards when units from one state came under command or were co-located with units from another state. This seems to account for a rather large number of Schaumburg-Lippe awards to RIR 24 and Saxon LdstIR 19, two units otherwise unconnected to the Principality. You can see why Prussia might be annoyed. If you were born in Königsberg and went into one of your local regiments, GR 3, you were a Prussian in a Prussian regiment whose Chef was the Kaiser and King of Prussia. So by the three criteria above, you got one decoration, the Iron Cross. If you were a Hamburg-born sergeant in in Bavaria's 8.IR, though, you could get a Hanseatic Cross based on nationality, a Bavarian Military Merit Cross based on contingent, and a Baden Merit Medal based on your Chef, all to go with your Iron Cross as a German soldier. I imagine, though, that a Frontsoldat, be he Bavarian, Prussian or Hamburger, was even more annoyed at the staff officers and support personnel at higher commands who racked up awards because of the various state formations they "supported". Among the worst offenders was the Kriegsamt, especially Wumba, which sent out lists of award recommendations to every state late in the war hoping to get various ones approved. This resulted in odd random combinations of "combatant" awards like the EK2, homefront-ribboned versions of other state awards, and awards specifically for homefront merit like the Saxon Kriegsverdienstkreuz and the Bavarian König-Ludwig-Kreuz.
    4 points
  16. Hmmm…you did say "favorite". This all reminds me of a song. To the tune “My Favorite Things” as sung by Julie Andrews. Tsingtau doc. groups and South See Pacific, Army, or Navy flight badges to be more specific, Research on medal bars that make their owner’s sing, These are a few of my favorite things… Doc. groups and medals to observers or pilots, MPs and WPs with brave wartime highlights, Orders with gold marks stamped on their rings, These are a few of my favorite things… When the fake comes, When the group splits, When I was outbid, I simply remember my favorite things and then I don’t feel so bad.
    4 points
  17. @David M The man with Prinz Joachim is Major Siegfried Graf zu Eulenburg - Regimentskommandeure of the 1. Garde-Regiment zu Fuß from the 6th of November 1916 to the 11th of December 1918
    3 points
  18. This seems to be a misunderstanding. Actually only 0.95% of the German population was Jewish (in 1912). 17,3 % of the Jewish population was found to serve in the German army.
    3 points
  19. Very nice one!! Congratulations! There was only one bavarian Officer with that combination of awards. Captain Ludwig POLAND. born 1873 somehow, after the China campaign , he retired and was called back for WW1. The 1st ribbon by the way represents a WW1 4th class with crown and swords, I wonder, why Poland did not have the fitting attachment added... There is no long service award because he did not have enough active years to get it. Maybe after WW1, but this bar dates around 1916, I would guess. Best, Daniel
    3 points
  20. No name, the photo doesn't belong to it. It came with this heavy case made by G.A. Scharffenberg.
    3 points
  21. One more: Not exactly limited, Colonel Fritz von Selle wearing wartime only, leaving out all his peacetime stuff. ...and even wearing all neck decorations except of the plm on the ribbon bar. Best, Daniel And then-Major Georg Wetzell did wear everything on his early 1916 ribbon bar. His later bars show again, wartime only. Best, Daniel
    3 points
  22. If you don't mind my asking, are you writing a book or research paper about generals of the land forces? If you are, maybe you should consider collaborating with forum-member Kriegsmarine Admiral on a gigantic book about both generals and admirals. I even have an idea for the title of the book: "Imperial Surf & Turf"
    3 points
  23. Panzerschiff Admiral Graf Spee tally. Cheers, Larry
    3 points
  24. Hi Chris, Here is a pure Imperial medal bar Christophe
    3 points
  25. Hi Lew, the bar belonged to Max Gölitz, Hauptmann der Landwehr ausser Dienst im Landsturm- Infanteriebataillon Chemnitz, in civil life he was a Kaufmann, business man. I can confirm his Schwarzburg cross 3rd class with swords and his swords to the Sacon Albert knight 1st class, as well as the Landwehr long service medal 2nd class. Best, Daniel
    3 points
  26. Unfortunately, that is not the impression you communicated. When you stated that "Sadly no knowledge of the original owner, but this is a delightful group" it implies that the bar is unattributed. I do not believe that a random assemblage of medals suspended from a modern medal bar could possibly have an "original owner" in the sense that experienced collectors use that term.
    3 points
  27. Here is my latest addition: it is a medal group belonging to Alexander Paul Kahle, Infantry Regiment 52. (Above: A. Kahle, c.1920) The Group consists of: Iron Cross II Class (Prussia) Order of Military Merit Cross I Class with Swords & Crown (Bavaria) Merit Cross II Class (Mecklenburg) Military Friedrich Cross (Anhalt) Flanders Cross (Antwerpen, Yser, Ypern, Somme, Flandernschlacht, Marnesschlacht, Durchbruchsschlacht, Verdun, Champagne clasps) Regimental Commemorative Cross (JNF. RGT. 52 clasp) Additionally: Merit Cross for War Aid (Prussia) 1914-1918 Hindenburg Medal 1915-1918 Bulgarian War Medal Wound Badge (Black) Alexander P. Kahle was born in Berlin in 1886. He attended school to 8th grade and started working in 1902 in the burgeoning film industry. He later worked as a stills photographer for Nestor, Decla, Maxine & UFA. He joined the Imperial German Army on the outbreak of the war with Infantry Regiment No.52, 10th Infantry Brigade, 5th Division. Details can be read at: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/5th_Division_(German_Empire) He married Hedwig Clara Lena Peste on 5th May 1916 in Cottbus, Germany, and by the end of his service had been promoted to NCO & decorated following surviving over 180 hand-to-hand engagements. (Above: A. Kahle, c.1915) Their daughter Ursula was born in Berlin on 19th October 1920, while Alexander was working with UFA. Alexander & his family emigrated to the USA in 1923, from Hamburg to New York, on board the Manchuria & arrived on 11th November 1923. They ended up in Sunnyvale, CA, in early 1924 & by the years end Kahle declared his intention to naturalise & moved to Los Angeles, CA. He got a job as a stills photographer for Pathè. His IMBD page makes excellent reading for the films he worked on, including King Kong (1933), Gunga Din (1939), Citizen Kane (1941), & She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949). More can be explored at: https://m.imdb.com/name/nm0434731/ https://www2.bfi.org.uk/films-tv-people/4ce2bbc7b2526 His daughter, Ursula, married Ensign William Rea Heath, Mercantile Marine, and his medal bar was included in this group. Her obituary makes interesting reading (particularly her story in 1939. More can be read at: https://www.legacy.com/obituaries/lamonitor/obituary.aspx?n=ursula-heath-kahle&pid=177255854 (Above: William R. Heath’s medal bar, including the Atlantic, Mid-East/Mediterranean, & Pacific zones bars) Kahle’s awards and accolades in the film industry can be read where much of this research came from: https://www.google.com/amp/s/ladailymirror.com/2015/02/16/mary-mallory-hollywood-heights-alex-kahle-shoots-the-angles/amp/ (Above: A. Kahle at the Oscars, c.1940s) Alexander Kahle died on 26 August 1968.
    3 points
  28. Hallo, hier habe ich die Abschnitte vergrößert. Folgende Truppeneintragungen sind zu finden: 15.9.1914 9. bay IR Rekrutendepot 10.12.14 10. Komp 9. bay IR ins Feld 27.1.15 ins Feldlazarett 12 Caumes 1.3.15 Ersatz / 9. bay. IR Genesendenkompanie 27.4.15 zum 4. bay. Reserve Infanterie Regiment Nr.4, 7. Kompanie 30.3.16 krank ins Kriegslazarett 3 XIV Armeekorps 30.4.16 Lazarett Schweinfurt 1.11.16 Ersatz / 4. bay RIR Genesendenkompanie 23.5.17 Ersatz / 4. bay RIR 2. Kompanie 30.5.17 Landwehr Infanterie Regiment Nr. 8, 3. Kompanie 5.11.17 zur bayr. Kriegslazarettabteilung 43 versetzt 19.12.17 LwIR 8, 3. Kompanie ins Feld 30.7.18 Ersatz / LwIR 8, 2. Kompanie 14.9.18 Freistellung zur Ablegung des Abiturexamens nach Freiburg, danach nach Marktbreit entlassen Beförderungen: 22.9.15 überzähliger Gefreiter 3.3.16 Unteroffizier Eisernes Kreuz 2. Klasse 2.3.1918 Verwundetenabzeichen 10.8.18 Hello, I've enlarged the sections here. The following troop entries can be found: 15.9.1914 9th bay IR recruit depot 10.12.14 10th comp 9. bay IR into the field 27.1.15 to the 12 Caumes field hospital 1.3.15 Replacement / 9th bay. IR convalescent company 27.4.15 to the 4th bay. Reserve Infantry Regiment No. 4, 7th Company 30.3.16 sick in the war hospital 3 XIV Army Corps 30.4.16 Schweinfurt hospital 1.11.16 replacement / 4th bay RIR convalescent company 23.5.17 Replacement / 4th bay RIR 2nd company 30.5.17 Landwehr Infantry Regiment No. 8, 3rd Company 5.11.17 to the Bavarian War hospital section 43 transferred 19.12.17 LwIR 8, 3rd company into the field 30.7.18 replacement / LwIR 8, 2nd company 14.9.18 exemption to take the Abitur exam in Freiburg, then released to Marktbreit Promotions: 22.9.15 surplus private 3.3.16 NCO Iron Cross 2nd Class 2.3.1918 Wound badge 10.8.18
    3 points
  29. 3 points
  30. Dear collectors. It's Christmas again, this year is an unforgettable year. I have met a few friends in the forum. First of all, I want to thank them for their help and answer my questions. I know that some countries in Europe are not happy now, and I hope that the new year can have a new start. I couldn't open GMIC a few days ago. I don't know when I can't log in here. I also have no way to determine which category my Christmas tree is sent to? So, I put it in the section of the German Empire that I like for everyone to appreciate. I only collect orders established before 1910. Of course, there are several versions of breast stars beyond this time. thanks for watching Merry Christmas
    3 points
  31. The Order of Merit of the Prussian Crown that was awarded to Swedish prime minister Arvid Lindman was sold today in auction for 370 000 SEK which is about 36 000 € plus 22,5% commission. Apparently only 57 ever awarded! See the beautiful pictures here: https://prob.auction2000.se/auk/w.object?inC=PROB&inA=20200526_1458&inO=446
    3 points
  32. He got the Swedish Order of the Sword on August 3rd 1905
    3 points
  33. Unrelated, but I was going through my pics in an effort to help out another member an thought these might be of interest to you, Kriegsmarine Admiral. Unfortunately, no names unless otherwise indicated. Kind regards, Sandro
    3 points
  34. The gartered star - I remember his MMThO being sold at Thies, does anyone know something about this star? If you prefer... Prinzen.
    3 points
  35. Hmm, this is not good, all this suspicion about someone who recently joined and decided to share his knowledge. Many collectors these days don't share, not because they are trolls (as Laurentinu's suggests) but because they want to protect their identity, or because discussion on fora has stooped down to the quality of your average Facebook chat. And yes, I do think Stephan owns Schwarzbook Verlag (as is evident from the watermark on his pics) - but I'm not sure how relevant that is to the question whether or not we should welcome his contributions. I, for one, welcome, Stephan to the Forum. His excellent 3 book series on Braunschweig has been in the works for some time, and its development could be seen on Facebook - I, for one, was alerted to it by our (former) fellow member Medalnet. Welcome to the club, Stephan, and thank you for your contributions sofar, of which I hope to see many more. Kind regards, Sandro
    3 points
  36. Guys, I am going to clean this thread up.... if anyone has a problem with the reason why someone is posting a bar... they have the choice to ignore them. many bars have been saved from obscurity because someone posted them... many interesting discussions have resulted... If you feel people are making money and that offends you... ignore the post. If you feel the need to voice your displeasure, shoot the person a PM, and leave it at that... Best Chris
    3 points
  37. First of all, the long bar doesn't even belong to you in that it's currently for sale somewhere else. And secondly, aren't you the guy who has gotten bars identified in this forum only to turn around and flip them for a hefty profit as "ID'd Bars" somewhere else? Aren't you also the guy who sold the von Schraeder bars to Erik in Slovenia for a tidy sum right after a member here identified it for you? I think you probably owe that member a commission and/or a case of wine for adding serious value to those bars for you. If dealers intend to financially benefit from the research skills of other members here, maybe they should state that information up-front in their posts. Just my two cents.
    3 points
  38. Has it really been 14 years already? Anyway, time for an update: As was suggested by Rick a long time ago, I have gone through Holm's website (http://ww2.dk) again and compiled all the missing Flak Oberstleutnants: So both the list above and this additional one constitute a compilation of those Flak Obersten and Oberstleutnants who were - commanders of a Flak Regiment, Flak Scheinwerfer Regiment, Flak Ersatz Regiment, Flak Sturm Regiment, Festungs Flak Regiment, Flak Lehr Regiment or Heimat Flak Abteilung, - commanders of a Flak Brigade, - commanders of a Flak Division, - chiefs of staff of the general command of a Flakkorps, - Higher Flak commanders in a Luftkreis, - Ia officers of an air defense command (Luftverteidigungskommando), (For Flak Generals, see the Luftwaffe Generals' Bios Series.) 1) Obstlt Walter Barg, Kdr FlakR 122, 27.12.43 - 15.2.45 2) Obstlt Fritz Benthin, Kdr FlakR 152, 14.11.44 - 8.5.45 3) Obstlt Hans Bertram, Kdr FlakR 142, 20.12.43 - 3.9.44 4) Obstlt Friedrich-Wilhelm Boehme, 3.2.45 - 5.45 (Chef des Stabes: Generalkommando V. Flakkorps) 5) Obstlt Hans-Friedrich Bolte, Kdr FlakR 124, 2.44 - 30.11.44 6) Obstlt Johann Büttner, Kdr FlakSturmR 3, 8.44 - 2.11.44 7) Obstlt Bruno Dannehl, Kdr FlakR 130, 11.44 - 11.12.44 8 ) Obstlt Oskar-Bruno Dennhardt, Kdr FlakScheinwR 113, 1.3.44 - 5.45 9) Obstlt Wilhelm Deventer, Kdr FlakR 104, 4.45 - 5.45 10)Obstlt Hans Dilschneider, Kdr FlakR 15, 2.10.44 - 21.1.45, Kdr FlakR 18, 24.1.45 - 8.5.45 11)Obstlt Erich Dittrich, Kdr FlakR 255, 16.7.44 - 8.5.45 12)Obstlt Fritz Dörpfeld, Kdr FlakR 138, 2.2.44 - 31.8.44 13)Obstlt Josef Eder, Kdr FlakR 128, 8.44 - 8.5.45 14)Obstlt Erich Elson, Ia Flak-Brigade VII, ? – 1945 15)Obstlt Herbert Fischer, Kdr FlakR 135, 6.7.43 - 9.12.44 16)Obstlt Kurt-Helmut Fischer, 17.9.44 - 4.45 (Chef des Stabes: Generalkommando IV. Flakkorps), Ia 1. Flak-Division 1944 - 9.44 17)Obstlt Dr. Heinrich Garve, Kdr FlakR 137, 11.8.44 - 8.5.45 18)Obstlt Erwin Grolig, Kdr Heimat-Flak-Abteilung 59, 8.1.45 - 8.5.45 19)Obstlt Karl Hahn, Kdr FlakR 103, 5.10.44 - 5.45 20)Obstlt Ernst-Joachim Heisig, 1944 - 2.45, Ia 18. Flak-Div. 21)Obstlt Gerhard Henze, Kdr FlakR 35, 1.44 - 3.44, Kdr FlakR 151, 2.45 - 3.45 22)Obstlt Oskar Hermanuz, Kdr FlakScheinwR 7, 1.45 - 4.45 23)Obstlt Bernhard Hildebrandt, Kdr FlakR 107, 28.8.43 - 30.1.45 24)Obstlt Uwe Hingst, Kdr FlakR 181, 1.2.44 - 5.2.45 25)Obstlt Erich Georg Hornig, 1944 - 5.45, Ia 12. Flak-Div. 26)Obstlt Kurt Hortian, Kdr FlakR 133, 22.9.44 - 8.5.45 27)Obstlt Alfred Karlhuber, Kdr FlakR 142, 4.9.44 - 8.5.45 28)Obstlt Albert Kissling, Kdr FlakR 148, 22.8.44 - 5.45 29)Obstlt Erich Köhler, Kdr FlakR 8, 9.44 - 10.44, Kdr FlakR 86, 4.10.44 - 5.45 30)Obstlt Richard Kolb, Kdr FlakR 43, 24.1.44 - 5.44 und 7.44 - 2.8.44 31)Obstlt Georg König, Kdr FlakR 126, 10.6.43 - 20.9.44, Kdr FlakR 88, 21.9.44 - 14.1.45 32)Obstlt Kurt Krebs, Kdr FlakR 120, 29.10.44 - 8.5.45 33)Obstlt Johann Edler von Krziwanek, Kdr FlakScheinwR 146, 4.45 - 4.45 34)Obstlt Herbert Künne, Kdr FlakR 72, 5.11.44 - 8.5.45 35)Obstlt Hans-Jens Lorenzen, Kdr FlakR 111, 23.6.44 - 14.1.45 36)Obstlt Wilhelm Mätje, Kdr FlakSturmR 2, 3.10.44 - 5.45 37)Obstlt Dr. Johannes Maus, Kdr FlakR 9, 12.9.44 - 7.5.45 38)Obstlt Fritz Mertelmeier, Kdr Heimat-Flak-Abteilung 3, 10.43 - 5.45 39)Obstlt Minkmeier, Kdr FlakR 42, 11.44 - 5.45 40)Obstlt Hans Montka, Kdr FlakR 201, 22.8.44 - 27.3.45 41)Obstlt Arpad Müller-Wildfelden, Kdr FlakScheinwR 139, 1.8.42 - 1944 42)Obstlt Ulrich Nicolai, Kdr FlakR 88, 20.11.43 - 20.9.44, Kdr FlakR 126, 21.9.44 - 8.5.45 43)Obstlt Alexander Paling, Ia Flak-Brigade XXI, ? - 4.45 44)Obstlt Heinrich Pollwein, Ia Flak-Brigade IV 23.10.44 - 5.45 45)Obstlt Walter Prilipp, , Kdr FlakR 39, 6.6.44 - 14.11.44 46)Obstlt Friedrich Ringelband, Kdr FlakScheinwR 108, 22.10.44 - 5.45 47)Obstlt Nikolaus Ritter, Kdr FlakR 63, 1.45 – 1945, Kdr FlakR 60, 17.3.45 - 8.5.45, 48)Obstlt Friedrich Römer, Kdr FlakR 60, 24.11.44 - 16.3.45. Kdr FlakR 66, 17.3.45 - 8.5.45 49)Obstlt Erich Rösner, Kdr FlakR 96, 1.1.44 - 9.44, Kdr Flak-Brigade XVI, 24.10.44 - 4.45 50)Obstlt Wilhelm Röttger, Kdr FlakR 9, 10.4.43 - 11.9.44, Kdr FlakR 25, 22.11.44 - 5.45 51)Obstlt Franz Rubesch, Kdr FlakR 80, 22.9.44 - 4.45 52)Obstlt Erich Ruthenberg, Kdr Heimat-Flak-Abteilung 59, 13.10.44 - 8.1.45 53)Obstlt Erhard Scheffel, Kdr FlakR 118, 29.10.44 - 8.5.45 54)Obstlt Wilhelm Schlodder, 10.2.45 - 8.5.45 (Chef des Stabes: Generalkommando VI. Flakkorps 55)Obstlt Heinrich Schnier, Kdr FlakR 105, 6.7.43 - 28.2.44 56)Obstlt Heinrich Schönemeyer, Kdr FlakR 134, 2.44 - 19.11.44 57)Obstlt Hans-Henning Schreiber, Kdr FlakR 26, 17.3.45 - 5.45 58)Obstlt Hans-Heinrich Schreiber, Kdr FlakR 66, 1.10.43 - 16.3.45 59)Obstlt Friedrich Schröck, Kdr FlakR 44, 4.8.44 - 1.45 60)Obstlt Günter Schwarzenberger, Kdr FlakR 21, 11.12.44 - 9.4.45 61)Obstlt Hermann Sell, Kdr FlakR 48, 24.10.43 - 8.5.45 62)Obstlt Friedrich Siebert, Kdr FlakR 28, 29.10.44 - 5.45 63)Obstlt Wilhelm Smollenski, Kdr FlakR 22, 2.2.44 - 2.5.45 64)Obstlt Alfred Thoran, Kdr FlakR 145, 1.11.44 - 8.2.45, Kdr FlakR 71, 10.4.45 - 4.45 65)Obstlt Hans Tödt, Kdr FlakR 107, 31.1.45 - 25.2.45, Kdr FlakR 54, 24.3.45 - 5.45 66)Obstlt Walter Weiss, Kdr FlakR 59, 1.44 - 14.11.44 67)Obstlt Johann Zieger, Kdr FlakR 131, 10.12.43 - 11.9.44, Kdr FlakR 78, 3.44 - 5.45 68)Obstlt Ernst Ziem, Kdr FlakR 3, 12.12.44 - 1.45
    3 points
  39. In a nice hotel close to the airport of Munich there is a nice painting which showa Franz Dettenhofer, the former owner of this hotel. In the German French War of 1870 / 71 he recieved the iron cross the silver and the golden military merit medal of the kingdom of Bavaria. I love the fact, that the painter had put so much effort in the details of the medails, isn't it amazing. That the owner of this hotel still kept this painting on the wall is even better, not quite usual in Germany these days. Franz Dettenhofer was famous for the liberation and rescue of some bavarian row and capturing of their french guards on the 7th. of december 1870. He got his silver medal on 1st of september 1870 and his golden medal on 11th. of october 1870. So he was a brave nco before he was a hotel director and owner of that hotel.
    3 points
  40. Hi Gents, here is a good site with further informations: https://juergenmauser.de/fm/page5/page22/page22.html Kind regards
    3 points
  41. Here is an award card and citation for this Red Banner. Name: Ivan Matveevich Dagilis Rank: Batallion Comissar (political officer rank equal to Captain) Position: Political assistant officer of the 1st Battalion commander, 20th Tank Regiment, 10th Tank Division, South-Eastern Front. Comrade Dagilis was a tank commander during the enemy lines attack on June 23, 1941 near the town of Radzehuv. Leading the attack forces with his tank he penetrated inside enemy tanks formation and managed to set on fire 2 enemy tanks. German troops concentrated intense artillery fire on his tank, so his tank got around 40 direct hits of armor piercing shells. His main gun, machine gun and tracks were damaged, both periscopes were destroyed and tank was set on fire. Only after that comrade Dagilis retreated and saved his crew. For this action commander of 10th Tank Division General Ogurtsov recommended Dagilis for Red Banner award Commander of South-Eastern Front awarded Dagilis with Red Banner on November 5, 1941. As you can see from his award card, Dagilis survived the war and finished it with the rank of Guards Colonel and in position of the Commander of 360th Self-Propelled Artillery Regiment. He was awarded with 3 Red Banners and OGPW 1st class.
    3 points
  42. Hello Waldo, Thank you for providing the link to this cast forgery. The quality of this forgery is good. For years, many collectors were deceived by these finely-cast pieces. I hope that members here study it, so that they avoid this type of counterfeit. It should also be noted that this isn't the only medal forgery like this. Many other types of medal forgeries have been made like this. They are sometimes still described as "original" pieces. Best regards,
    3 points
  43. He is actually in the 1914 rank list, on page 755, as a Rittmeister der Reserve (V Berlin) in the reserve of Husaren-Regiment Nr. 7, with the RAO4, LD1, CDIII2 and JM4. It is Dr. Arthur Mudra, Ambassador to Ecuador from 1928 to 1932. He was born on 30 December 1871 in Berlin and died in 1960. Almost all of his foreign decorations were as a diplomat, not an Army officer. He was a consul in Shanghai during the Boxer Rebellion, and later in Yokohama and Nagasaki (where he also represented Italy and Romania), so that would account for the Chinese, Japanese and Italian decorations. In 1910 he was Generalkonsul in Philadelphia and was still there after World War I started, since he is recorded as protesting British armed merchant ships in the Port of Philadelphia in September 1914. He returned to Germany at some point later, and received the Schaumburg-Lippe Kreuz für Treue Dienste on 25.02.1916 while serving with Staffelstab 389. I would assume there is a more complete biography in the Biographisches Handbuch des deutschen Auswärtigen Dienstes 1871-1945, but I do not have the volume with the letter "M". Maybe Glenn or Daniel has access to it.
    3 points
  44. Hello to all, Here is a four-placer that I bought this weekend at the SOS. I was glad to add this one to my collection as you don't often see an order/decoration from Waldeck-Pyrmont on a medal bar. Hope you like it! Best regards, Tom
    3 points
  45. Hello to all, Here is a five-placer from the recent SOS. I bought this one because I like Third Reich Police bars and it is really clean, condition-wise. Best regards, Tom
    3 points
  46. Omg that new blues uniform is sooooo frigging ugly. I loved my "dress" blues in the Army. What they have done to them is horrible. Blech..... do that many people in higher hq need promotions that we change the uniform every two years??
    3 points
  47. Another small contribution from my side... It´s the medalbar of Friedrich Metze, director of the Artilleriewerkstatt Lippstadt.
    2 points
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