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  1. Just got this medal bar in to complete my humble grouping. Thoughts?
    2 points
  2. A little bit I would like to add is, von Wedel was also one of just 21 people awarded the Oldenburg Einnerungsmedaille 1870/71
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  3. It will probably take me several inputs to add this story, as I am not a great typist so bare with me. The Houndsditch Murders and the Siege of Sidney Street. The following medals were awarded to City of London Police Constable James Frederick Amos and include the City of London Police Queen Victoria Jubilee medal for 1897, the City of London Police Coronation medals for 1902 and 1911. The inscription for the Jubilee medal is 'PC 753 J Amos' the Coronation medal for 1902 is 'PC J Amos' and the Coronation medal for 1911 is 'PC J F Amos.' These medals were originally owned by Roger Perkins who is the author of the book, 'The Punjab Mail Murder,' published in 1979. Roger Perkins carried out the original research on James Frederick Amos's City of London Police career and the above medals in 1979/1980 and was a member of the, 'Orders and Medals Research Society.' An important point regarding the, 'Houndsditch Murders and the Siege of Sidney Street,' is that James Frederick Amos was a Detective Constable stationed at Bishopsgate Police Station during this period. He was promoted to the rank of Detective Constable and transferred to Bishopsgate Police Station on the 4th of January in 1904 and remained there as a Detective Constable at Bishopsgate Police Station until he retired on pension on the 21st of August in 1919. By the time of the Houndsditch Murders in December of 1910 and the Sidney Street Siege in January of 1911, Detective Constable James F Amos was an experienced detective with approximately 7 years service in the C.I.D. department at Bishopsgate Police Station/division. These two incidents, 'Houndsditch Murders and the Sidney Street Siege,' produced events and scenes never before witnessed by the horrified Londoners and the authorities. In 1893, James Frederick Amos's physical description was stated as the following :- James Frederick Amos was single. Aged 20 years and 4 months old. Was five feet nine and three quarter inches tall. Had grey eyes. Had brown hair. Had a tattoo - blue ink 'anchor and J' on the left forearm. In 1893, the conditions for joining the City of London Police were as follows :- Must not be under the age of 20 or over the age of 27. Must not be less than five feet nine inches tall. Must not have a chest measurement less than thirty six inches. Must not have more than 2 children. Is not permitted to carry on any trade, nor will his wife be permitted to keep a shop. Must be able to read and write legibly. Must have satisfactory references. Must be certified physically fit by the Police Surgeon. Must declare any military service etc. Must devote all of his time to the Police Service. History of Detective James Frederick Amos. James Frederick Amos was born in Holy Cross, Canterbury in Kent, in 1872. James parents were Charles and Sarah Amos and he married Mary Wright in 1904. James F Amos joined the City of London Police on the 9th of March in 1893 and was issued with the warrant number of 6402. Police Constable James Amos was assigned to Cloak Lane Police Station, D division and given the collar number of 753. On the 12/2/1894, Police Constable James Amos was placed on report for 'allowing his disused helmet to remain on a shelf in the dormitory in a dirty and untidy manner.' Guess what - he was 'pardoned.' On the 17/11/1896, Police Constable James Amos was placed on report for 'idling and gossiping with PC745 Shersby for approximately 5 minutes.' Guess what - he was 'pardoned.' In 1897, awarded the Queen Victoria's Jubilee medal for being on duty during her Jubilee. From 5/5/1893-4/5/1899 he progressed from the 6th rate of pay [25/- per week] up to the 1st rate of pay [36/3- per week]. On the 15/7/1899, James F Amos was appointed to, 'Plain Clothes Patrol,' and at a rate of pay of 41/3- shilling per week. On the 15/1/1900, there is an Old Bailey trial case in which Percy Theo [29] was charged with stealing a coat and some other articles and City Detective James Amos gave evidence. The prisoner was found guilty and sentenced to 3 years penal servitude. On the 2/4/1900, there is an Old Bailey trial case in which a Joseph Davies [47] was charged with maliciously wounding and occasioning actual bodily harm. James Amos Detective Officer gave evidence but the accused was found not guilty. On the 10/7/1902, Detective Constable James Amos was reported for 'being inside a PH for the purpose of drinking whilst on duty,' fined 5/- shillings. In 1902, awarded the Coronation medal for being on duty during the Coronation. On re-organisation - on the 4/1/1904, Police Constable F Amos was promoted to Detective Constable and transferred to Bishopsgate Police Station/E division and given the collar number of 88. On the 5/12/1907, Detective Constable James Amos was commended by the Judge at the C.C. Court and was awarded £1 and was also commended by the Commissioner for praiseworthy conduct displayed in the prosecution of 3 men for conspiracy and fraud. On the 23/3/1909, Detective Constable James Amos was involved in another Old Bailey case involving deception and forgery. On the 21/7/1909, Detective Constable James Amos was commended and awarded 7/6- shillings for vigilance and discretion in connection with the arrest of 3 men for robbery. On the 16th of December in 1910, saw the cold blooded murder of Sergeant Thomas Charles Tucker, Sergeant Robert Bentley and Police Constable Walter Charles Choat. They had attempted to stop a burglary by a gang of anarchists, at 11 Exchange Buildings, in Houndsditch. Two other City of London Policemen were also shot and wounded and these events were a heavy blow especially to their colleagues at Bishopsgate Police Station. Every City of London Detective joining the hunt for the killers was armed with Army Service revolver and the City of London had approximately 100 detectives on the case and that must have been their entire establishment. It is interesting to note that the killers were suspected to have left the City of London's area and were believed to have gone into hiding in the Metropolitan district of Whitechapel. About 90 detectives were scouring these East End haunts and that most of these Detectives were City Detectives, like Detective Constable James Amos. The Metropolitan Police also pulled out all the stops to ensure these individuals were caught. On the 3rd of January in 1911, two members of the gang which had murdered the 3 City of London Police officers were found hiding at 100 Sidney Street, in Stepney. Thus began the 'Siege of Sidney Street,' and although this was Whitechapel or 'H' division's area, of the Metropolitan Police, City of London Police Detectives were there and assisting their colleagues. The Army were also called in to assist and the 2 anarchists were killed and the building was destroyed by fire. In the Census of 1911, we find that James F Amos [38] is recorded as being employed as a 'Detective Constable' and is residing with his wife Mary Amos [29] and his daughter Evelyn Mary Amos [6] at 2 Belton Road, in Tottenham. In 1911, awarded the Coronation medal for being on duty during the Coronation. On the 2/7/1912, Detective Amos is in another Old Bailey case involving theft and receiving and the prisoner receives a sentence of 3 years penal servitude and 5 years preventive detention. On the 31/8/1914, Detective Constable James Amos was given 'Rent Aid - New Merit Class,' of 3/- shillings per week and it also records he was receiving a Detective allowance of 8/- shilling per week. On the 8/5/1918, Detective Constable James Amos was commended for initiative, resource and attention to duty in arresting two men for larceny. On the 21/8/1919, Detective Constable James Frederick Amos retired on pension from Bishopsgate Police Station and the City of London Police. His weekly rate of pay was, at that time, 95/- shilling per week and with a 3/- shillings rent aid. James Frederick Amos's annual pension amounted to £165.5s.8d. In the Census of 1939, James F Amos is residing at 10 Marlborough Road, Ilfracombe, in Devon and is recorded as being a retired City Police officer. In 1941, between January to March, James F Amos dies and the death is registered in Barnstaple in Devon.
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  4. Dossenbach was a native Badener. The ribbon is for the Ritterkreuz 2. Klasse mit Schwertern of the Order of the Zähringen Lion, awarded on 1.6.1915.
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  5. Here I send you what I have from Karl Heinrich von Hänisch ??.01.1905 Russ. St. Annen Orden II. Klasse 21.01.1906 Roter Adler Orden III. Klasse mit der Schleife ??.02.1908 Komturkreuz II. Klasse des hzgl. sachs.-ernestin. Haus-Ordens ??.10.1908 Kgl. Krone zum Roten Adler Orden III. Klasse mit der Schleife 01.06.1910 Kgl. Kronen Orden II. Klasse 01.06.1912 Roter Adler Orden II. Klasse mit Eichenlaub ??.09.1913 Großkreuz des hzgl. sachs.-ernestin. Haus-Ordens ??.04.1914 Bayer. Militär-Verdienst-Orden II. Klasse mit dem Stern Eisernes Kreuz II. Klasse Eisernes Kreuz I. Klasse 12.08.1916 Stern zum Roten Adler Orden II. Klasse mit Eichenlaub und Schwertern 10.05.1917 Verdienstkreuz für Kriegshilfe
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  6. Moin, hier mal die Offiziere vom IR 75, die laut RG den Hohenzollern bekommen haben: GreyC
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  7. This is the final presentation of '''''Detective Constable James Frederick Amos's medals''''' as it they now go into my collection. Their write-up is completed and all the information is placed into a folder and the medals are housed as shown in the photographs. The presentation boxes and the padded insert can be found on ebay or by going directly to the company and they are made in China and of good quality and most importantly quite cheap to buy.
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  8. Saw this thought it might be of interest? https://you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/proposed-90th-year-commemoration-queen-elizabeth-medal-for-those-who-have-served-in-harm-s-way/
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  9. He was Transportation Chef of the Prussian Army before the war , then in 1914 Chief of Staff of the Seventh Army under General Josias von Heringen in 1915 Commander of the XIV AK and finally Chief of Staff acting Commander of the X AK in Hannover. please enter your search as follows : Karl von Haenisch the Prussian Machine . there you will find more data
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  10. I am taking the liberty, and employing my God-like powers as an moderator, to post this intersting story, sent me by a gent in Australia who is in the process of getting GMIC membership. Enjoy! https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-07-11/the-anzacs-who-beat-the-odds-and-escaped-from-greece/100284226
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  11. Here we have another Whitechapel or 'H' division Police Constable who may have witnessed the Sidney Street Siege, first hand. PC John William Cole who was awarded the Metropolitan Police Coronation medals for 1902 and 1911 and served his entire pensionable engagement with the Police in Whitechapel. John William Cole joined the Metropolitan Police on the 14/10/1901 and was assigned to Whitechapel or 'H' division and he was given the warrant number of 87893. In 1902 he was awarded the Metropolitan Police Coronation medal for 1902 whilst serving in Whitechapel. In 1909, PC John William Cole married Rose Georgiana Darnell who was the widow of Police Sergeant William Darnell who had retired from the Metropolitan Police and Whitechapel or 'H' division on the 29th of July in 1907. Retired Police Sergeant William Darnell died shortly after retiring from the Police and this occurred in Bethnal Green in 1908. John William Cole was approximately 10 years younger than Rose Darnell and it would appear police widows regularly remarried other members of the police service. There definitely appears to be a real family bond within the Metropolitan and City of London Police during these times and you can regularly see cases where police widows are then employed as cleaners/house keepers in various police establishment etc The criteria for bringing back officers to assist with the Jubilee or Coronation Parades also appeared to favour their retired [pension] colleagues first and there are lots of examples of daughters marrying their partners who are already serving within the Police establishment etc. In 1911 he was awarded the Metropolitan Police Coronation medal for 1911 whilst serving in Whitechapel. On the 16/101927, PC John William Cole retired on pension from the Metropolitan Police and from Whitechapel division.
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  12. Here is another example of a Whitechapel Policemen who might have been in attendance at the Sidney Street Siege. PC Edgar Greenacre was awarding the Metropolitan Police Queen Victoria Jubilee medal for 1897, Metropolitan Police Coronation medals for 1902 and 1911. Police Constable Edgar E Greenacre who joined the Metropolitan Police on the 10/3/1890 and was assigned to Southwark or 'M' division, warrant number 75404. Awarded the Jubilee medal for 1897 whilst serving with Southwark or 'M' division. Sometime between the last half of 1897 and the first half of 1902, PC Edgar E Greenacre transferred to Whitechapel or 'H' division. Awarded the Coronation medal for 1902 whilst serving with Whitechapel or 'H' division. Awarded the Coronation medal for 1911 whilst serving with Whitechapel or 'H' division. 1911......Sidney Street Siege.......was he there? 20/12/1920 Police Constable Edgar E Greenacre retires on pension from Whitechapel or 'H' division and the Metropolitan Police and in his pension records we find the following information :- When PC Edgar Greenacre retired from the Metropolitan Police on the 20/12/1920, he was on 'Special Duties' attached to the 'Tower of London' and it was paid for by the 'Office of Works.' This is confirmed in his pension records. Special Duties are only recorded on the Metropolitan Police pension records when the individual was still employed on them at the time of leaving the police. This special duty fell within Whitechapel or 'H' division's responsibility since it was within the divisional area. Because special duties are only recorded on the pension records when the individual is still activity on them at the time of his retirement......this means they are harder to fine and evidence.
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  13. He was elevated to the princely rank of Fürst from that of a Graf (Count) on 18 April 1914. Regards Glenn
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  14. Thanks for the information dpk and I had a quick look on the ''OMRS'' site and it is extremely interesting. Hi Gordon - Since you are evidencing the photographs together with his detailed service with Whitechapel or 'H' division, during this period, I think the chances of this being the same person are reasonable/good but the chances of him having attended Sidney Street Siege are even better. I would suspect of the 200 City and Metropolitan Police that initially attended Sidney Street, the greatest percentage of that number would have come from Whitechapel or 'H' division. I don't know what Whitechapel or 'H' divisions uniformed establishment was in 1911 but it could easily mean a quarter of the entire division's men attended the siege. I believe further reinforcements were requested later as the siege progressed but I am sure these would have been supplied by the other divisions nearby. I believe I read somewhere that initially shotguns were given to Policemen that had served in the military but I am also sure they would have been issued to Policemen who had fired and had experience with shotguns ie those from estates and from the countryside. Anyway it is an interesting question - what was the total percentage of manpower supplied by Whitechapel or 'H' division. I remember reading the City of London Police had to commit 100 police officers to secure the ''Exchange Buildings,'' location after the Latvians anarchists/revolutionaries killed the 3 City Policemen.
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  15. Looks to be Ernst-Günther Baade.
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  16. Thank you, Andreas, that is correct. He was already mentioned here: The Prussian and Glenn helped with the biographical details: Hans Kolbe, geb. 11.5.82 Diensteintritt April 1900. RL 1904: Lt.z.S. auf "Kaiser Wilhelm II" RL 1907: Olt.z.S. auf Torpedoboot "S124" RL 1909: auf Torepedoboot "Taku" RL 1911: Kp.Lt. Marinestation der Ostsee RL 1912: auf Torpedoboot "G192" Februar 1915 Chef 2. Torpedo-Halbflottille April 1917 Chef 3. Torpedo-Halbflottille bis Kriegsende Korvettenkapitän 21.1.20 (vergleichbar mit Major im Heere) Fregattenkapitän 1.5.25 (~ Oberstleutnant) Kapitän z.S. 1.1.28 (~ Oberst) Orden (gem RL 1918): RAO4, Hohenzollern Ritterkreuz m. Schw., EKI, LübH Das DAK für 25 Jahre würde 1924 auch passen. so: EKII, Hohenzollern, RAO, DAK, Mecklenburg, Lübeck Der Letzte ist der schwedische Wasa-Orden (Ritterkreuz 2.Kl.), den hatte er laut RL 1914: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wasaorden Herr Kolbe hat sich auch eine Wikiseite gegönnt: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hans_Kolbe_(Landrat) Und er war auch im GMIC in Behandlung: https://gmic.co.uk/topic/44238-vizeadmiral-hans-kolbe/
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  17. 'The Houndsditch Murders.' Basically at approximately 11pm on Friday the 16th of December in 1910, 5 uniformed City of London Police and 2 City of London Police Plain Clothes officers from Bishopsgate Police Station, attempted to stop a burglary from taken place at the rear of 11 Exchange Buildings, in Houndsditch. The anarchists/Latvians plan was to use one of the empty premises and from the rear of the Exchange Building to break into a jeweller's shop and then gain access to the shops safe which was thought to have tens of thousands of pounds of jewellery inside the safe. The gang were rumbled and decided to shoot their way out of the situation, killing Sergeant Bentley, Sergeant Tucker and Police Constable Choat. They also wounded 2 other policemen and although they recovered from their wounds, they had to be pensioned out of the service due to their injuries. The bravery of these Police officers was so admired, that the authorities instituted the 'Kings Police medal' especially to acknowledge such brave acts. There was a huge public outcry over the cold blooded killings of these Policemen and money started to pour in to help the families of the dead policemen. The funerals of Sergeants Tucker and Bentley were held in London and approximately 750,000 people lined the route to the funeral procession. Police Constable Choat was buried in his home town to another huge official event. 'The Sidney Street Siege.' The 'Siege of Sidney Street,' is also known as the 'Battle of Stepney' and was a battle between the Police, Army and the Latvian anarchists or revolutionaries. The Metropolitan and City of London Police identified individuals involved in the murder of the 3 City of London Policemen and 2 of these individuals were discovered hiding at 100 Sidney Street. On the morning of the 3rd of January in 1911, an initial force of some 200 Metropolitan and City of London Police descended on 100 Sidney Street. After approximately 6 hours, the 2 Latvian criminals were dead and the building had been burned down to the ground.
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  18. @Deutschritter, My understanding of why he was awarded it was due to his position in the Prussian army in 1870, and being a native of Oldenburg, would have made a good candidate to award. And no, civilians were not just awarded this, from my recollection only a single digit amount of awards were civilian.
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  19. London gazette lists all awards from its foundation and is available on line. It is tedious donkey work on but can be rewarding (no published rolls). Paul
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  20. Another first name - Lt dR (or should it be Lt dL?) Waldemar John. His picture also appears in 'Der Welt Spiegel' dated 15th April 1915. https://www.kreisheimatverein.de/online-bibliothek/biografien-2/john/ https://dfg-viewer.de/show?tx_dlf[double]=0&tx_dlf[id]=https%3A%2F%2Fcontent.staatsbibliothek-berlin.de%2Fzefys%2FSNP27646518-19150415-0-0-0-0.xml&tx_dlf[page]=2&cHash=a7d9549f2b55e18bdbece082f8f22823
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  21. Hello Gentlemen, Here an actual photo of Hero National of Angola The one of 1st President of Angola Agostinho Neto Regards to all. Emmanuel
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  22. I am pretty sure, that Pelkmann didn't recieved the 1st class of the Braunschweig War Merit Cross.
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  23. Great new additions! Thanks for sharing and please keep them coming; I enjoy learning more about the Boer War and the various campaigns/battles through your thread as it is not my area of expertise.
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  24. Some more excellent new additions! The Syrian campaign group is a great find! I wonder how many (if any) managed to escape over the border to Turkey? Turkey differed from Switzerland in its neutrality as escaped pows would not be interned, but were sent across to Egypt and could get back into the fight quickly! One of my more recently groups was to a man who escaped from Crete and made his way to Turkey later being killed in action in NW Europe.
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  25. Hello All, I have in my collection 3 different PLS&GC medal obverses- GVI crowned head "Britt Omn Rex Fid Def", QEII crowned head "D.G. Br. Omn" and QEII crowned head "Dei Gratia". I think that is the full set of obverse types but happy to learn more! The GVI is cupro nickel, the QEII "D.G. Br. Omn' is cupro nickel, the QEII "Dei Gratia" is rhodium plated. I think there may also be a QEII "Dei Gratia" in cupro nickel??
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  26. Another very nice item to add to your collection, never seen one for Newport before, thanks for posting. Regards Simon.
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  27. Another excellent Group and really nice to have the associated paperwork, Thanks for showing us another item from your collection. Regards Simon.
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  28. Hi John, I have found a picture online of this man whilst interned in Holland! Hope you are glad to put a face to the name! Rob
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  29. An amazing find, John. Congratulations! I hope that the missing WWI pair turn up. Regards Brett
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  30. Not only the medals changed over time ..................... the cap badges got bigger and better too !!
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  31. And the day before retirement in 2008. Hallelujah !!
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  32. Feeling the pressure as a Chief Inspector around 2005 .................
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  33. Family tradition ....................... grandfather, father and son.
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  34. Grandfather in his later days .................
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  35. My grandfather in his early police days, not long after the end of the First World War, where he was severely wounded at the Battle of Arras in 1917 ....................
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  36. And shown beside my private purchase 'wearing' copies on the right .................................. of poorer quality.
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  37. Mine .......................................
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  38. Excuse me John, sorry my mistake. I have no idea how I did turn one group into two......... One great group, with a great research and it is always a real pleasure for me to read your description(s). In my humble opinion worth to be published in a book or a magazine such as "Britain at War". Best regards Eric-Jan
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  39. John Great new additions, great write-ups. I have a copy of of the book "Flywheel" (Stalag 4B) published in the 80's to raise funds for the Red Cross. The artwork is amazing considering the conditions these were produced under. Regards Brian
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  40. Indeed, there was some kind of agreement with POWs over a certain age that had been POWs for a certain period of time could be sent to switzerland.... apparently the conditions were often harsher than the POWs camps they had been in up until then.....
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  41. John, What a nice little gem that program booklet is. Well known characters and great to see the ranks and names of all that are involved. Thanks for showing. Best regards Eric-Jan
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  42. John not sure if you have seen the whiskey advert but it goes like this: "Give that man a Bell's" well done, you deserve one and could not resist the pun regards your man Bell! Your collection is trully interesting and the info first class Keep them coming. Brian
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  43. Congratulations on a great addition to your already fantastic POW collection! While such 'small' WWII medal groups seem less appealing than larger groups, they may represent men such as Roberts, who had very adventurous wars. A few days ago I was tempted to buy a 39/45 Star/War Medal pair to a seaman who was killed when his RN ship was sunk during the evacuation of Dunkirk. I resisted the temptation since I stopped collecting WWII RN medals many years ago because of the difficulty in researching the men behind the medals. Regards Brett
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  44. Great new additions. It has to be the finest collection of POW related lapel badges and other devices I have seen, well done in acquiring them. These object are often disposed of and not considered worthy of collecting by many mainstrem collectors and dealers. Please keep posting. Brian
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  45. Hi Azyeoman My friend Brett Hendey told me about this thread, glad he did As a fellow POW collector and have a number ranging from WW1 to WW2, 99% South African I must say your collection is impressive. What started as a "sub-theme" for me has actually become a major one. There is always something to find on these guys, especially if they escaped. I have not been a huge contributer here on the GMIC but will start to add some of mine. Hope you will find them interesting when I start. One of my highlights was finding a diary convering a South African Policeman Officers time as a German guest. A large number of SA Police fought as infantrymen and many were taken at Tobruk when it fell. Not much free time so please be patient. Regards Brian
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  46. Death of a loved one as a POW must have been particularly sad and stressful for their next-of-kin, a double misfortune to bear. Living in a country where the dead of past wars are being forgotten for political and cultural reasons, it is encouraging to see that this does not happen in countries with a well-educated and cultured population. I have a South African friend who has settled in Taiwan and, when I last heard from him in early November last year, he wrote as follows: "I'm in the midst of preparations for remembrance week. Apart from the big Remembrance Sunday event for the former allied nations at the memorial at the site of the former Kinkaseki POW Camp, we have a dedication of a memorial at the site of the Karenko POW Camp where the Allied high command and top civil officials were held following the falls of Singapore/Malaya, Dutch East Indies, Hong Kong and the Philippines and islands like Guam etc. We have the family of Maj Gen Merton Beckwith-Smith OC of 18th (British) Div captured at Singapore attending. Beckwith-Smith died in the camp on 11 November 1942." Had Beckwith-Smith died in South Africa, I can confidently say that, since 11 November passes largely without the honouring of war dead, the 60th anniversary of his death on that tragic day in the calendar would have received no civic recognition. Regards Brett
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  47. What a focused collection. Is that African medal for a South African soldier? I did not know that the British had a special medal for the region.
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  48. Apologies cannot help with the two lapel pins, however appreciate sharing of the groups. Interesting topic / theme.
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  49. Fantastic! Alas, this IPad doesn't show much detail. The history behind some of these really makes one reflect. Singapore really wasn't the place to be captured was it? Can we see the militia group please? I have never seen one before.
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