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  1. I think your reaction is out of line and childish to say the least. Simius Rex was being very respectful and only trying to help. Is it really "too inaccessible, too elitist and too semantic" to try to be historically accurate? That is the raison d'etre for forums like this to exist. You obviously showed this bar hoping for a fawning "ooh, aah" reaction from other members. When you didn't get it and your lack of basic knowledge was quickly exposed, you made the absolutely inane and silly response of "I collect medals, not ribbons". (What medal collector doesn't collect ribbons?). If you're intent on leaving the forum after only 41 posts because you can't accept the truth, while unfortunate, it's no great loss to any of us. Obviously, based on your reaction, you're not interested in history but only in accumulating shiny things like some magpie.
    6 points
  2. Afghan Order of Glory, established in 1982 and abolished ten years later. Regards
    5 points
  3. The explanation for the rough finish of the MVK2 that started the thread is not that it was immersed in water. The explanation was provided in my two postings above along with relevant photographs of other crosses that fall into the same classification... namely, Gussfertigungen aus Geschützbronze (cast crosses made from captured enemy artillery pieces.) As stated, these genuine, period-original, CAST crosses range from mediocre looking to crappy looking. But they are 100% original to the period. I don't know why I bother writing anything in my posts because some people simply look at the pretty pictures but don't take the time to read what the pictures represent.
    5 points
  4. It was gently pointed out to me that I was on the verge of hijacking somebody else's thread by posting some of my own material for review. Therefore, I am starting a new thread with a very specific focus. Mr. Daniel Krause in another thread brilliantly researched and identified a potential owner of one of my bars for which I am eternally grateful. In conjunction with my bar, he mentioned a fashion-trend among German officers involving ribbon-bars featuring a limited assortment of decorations. I first heard about this from an old German collector many many years ago, but I completely forgot about it until now. Apparently, some highly decorated officers with many awards had ribbon-bars created with a limited assortment of decorations. This makes reasearching these bars very difficult and confusing! I have at least one such ribbon bar in my collection. It baffled me for many years. There is a KO with X but no colonial ribbon. There is no long service award. There are no peacetime decorations. Experienced collectors who saw it believed it might be a fantasy item. Then, a very knowledgable Wuerttemberg collector sent me a photo of the owner wearing this exact same bar. This officer selected only his Kriegsauszeuchnungen to wear on his battlefield tunic. I am hoping others in the forum might show their "abreviated" bars to make this an interesting thread. Best Regards.
    4 points
  5. Nice examples shown so far Here's one from my own collection: these are the Kleinmann bars; the short one must have been one of his first bars and the double row set probably the last from ww2. Now we add in some photo's (cropped and zoomed in): these are some of the iterations he went through, starting with ribbons through a buttonhole and later changing to ribbon bars. Since there also is a 4 place ribbon bar with foreign awards -the one in the photo only shows German awards- somewhere in between the iterations he changed ribbon bars and only later combined his German and foreign awards into a longer bar. If there is an interest in the full photo's I can post these, and his other ww1 photo's (10 in total), in this or another thread. Best. Peter PS the longest Georg Veit bar is in my collection, but it's o.k. to show 👍
    4 points
  6. Came across this photo and I thought no better time than the present to add it!
    4 points
  7. Hi everybody After many years of research, I have found all medals to go with this nice medal bar. Christophe
    4 points
  8. Dear all, I just found a bigger brother bar to the bar that has been originally posted in this thread, please see the photo's. I received the bar today. This bar took me more than 6 month's to acquire, a relieve it finally arrived. If it wasn't for this thread I would never have thought this was a viable and original combination so kudo's to the original poster I've also dug up and added Veit's entry in the 1914 rank list. Amazingly he is already listed with having received 12 awards by 1914 🙀
    4 points
  9. Here you are: Oberst Walter von Conrady, - very limited - limited - full Have some more examples, but this is quite "extreme". Best, Daniel
    4 points
  10. HI Another example. Here is Oberst Bernhard von Süßmilch from IR 139. In the first photo he is wearing his big medal bar for officiel photo. Here is ribbon bar. On the second photo, the same officer has chosen to wear only its wartime medals. Even if they received a lot of medals before the war, for those kind of officers the real medals are the wartime medals Christophe
    4 points
  11. @David M The man with Prinz Joachim is Major Siegfried Graf zu Eulenburg - Regimentskommandeure of the 1. Garde-Regiment zu Fuß from the 6th of November 1916 to the 11th of December 1918
    3 points
  12. This seems to be a misunderstanding. Actually only 0.95% of the German population was Jewish (in 1912). 17,3 % of the Jewish population was found to serve in the German army.
    3 points
  13. Very nice one!! Congratulations! There was only one bavarian Officer with that combination of awards. Captain Ludwig POLAND. born 1873 somehow, after the China campaign , he retired and was called back for WW1. The 1st ribbon by the way represents a WW1 4th class with crown and swords, I wonder, why Poland did not have the fitting attachment added... There is no long service award because he did not have enough active years to get it. Maybe after WW1, but this bar dates around 1916, I would guess. Best, Daniel
    3 points
  14. No name, the photo doesn't belong to it. It came with this heavy case made by G.A. Scharffenberg.
    3 points
  15. One more: Not exactly limited, Colonel Fritz von Selle wearing wartime only, leaving out all his peacetime stuff. ...and even wearing all neck decorations except of the plm on the ribbon bar. Best, Daniel And then-Major Georg Wetzell did wear everything on his early 1916 ribbon bar. His later bars show again, wartime only. Best, Daniel
    3 points
  16. If you don't mind my asking, are you writing a book or research paper about generals of the land forces? If you are, maybe you should consider collaborating with forum-member Kriegsmarine Admiral on a gigantic book about both generals and admirals. I even have an idea for the title of the book: "Imperial Surf & Turf"
    3 points
  17. Panzerschiff Admiral Graf Spee tally. Cheers, Larry
    3 points
  18. Hi Chris, Here is a pure Imperial medal bar Christophe
    3 points
  19. Hi Lew, the bar belonged to Max Gölitz, Hauptmann der Landwehr ausser Dienst im Landsturm- Infanteriebataillon Chemnitz, in civil life he was a Kaufmann, business man. I can confirm his Schwarzburg cross 3rd class with swords and his swords to the Sacon Albert knight 1st class, as well as the Landwehr long service medal 2nd class. Best, Daniel
    3 points
  20. Unfortunately, that is not the impression you communicated. When you stated that "Sadly no knowledge of the original owner, but this is a delightful group" it implies that the bar is unattributed. I do not believe that a random assemblage of medals suspended from a modern medal bar could possibly have an "original owner" in the sense that experienced collectors use that term.
    3 points
  21. Here is my latest addition: it is a medal group belonging to Alexander Paul Kahle, Infantry Regiment 52. (Above: A. Kahle, c.1920) The Group consists of: Iron Cross II Class (Prussia) Order of Military Merit Cross I Class with Swords & Crown (Bavaria) Merit Cross II Class (Mecklenburg) Military Friedrich Cross (Anhalt) Flanders Cross (Antwerpen, Yser, Ypern, Somme, Flandernschlacht, Marnesschlacht, Durchbruchsschlacht, Verdun, Champagne clasps) Regimental Commemorative Cross (JNF. RGT. 52 clasp) Additionally: Merit Cross for War Aid (Prussia) 1914-1918 Hindenburg Medal 1915-1918 Bulgarian War Medal Wound Badge (Black) Alexander P. Kahle was born in Berlin in 1886. He attended school to 8th grade and started working in 1902 in the burgeoning film industry. He later worked as a stills photographer for Nestor, Decla, Maxine & UFA. He joined the Imperial German Army on the outbreak of the war with Infantry Regiment No.52, 10th Infantry Brigade, 5th Division. Details can be read at: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/5th_Division_(German_Empire) He married Hedwig Clara Lena Peste on 5th May 1916 in Cottbus, Germany, and by the end of his service had been promoted to NCO & decorated following surviving over 180 hand-to-hand engagements. (Above: A. Kahle, c.1915) Their daughter Ursula was born in Berlin on 19th October 1920, while Alexander was working with UFA. Alexander & his family emigrated to the USA in 1923, from Hamburg to New York, on board the Manchuria & arrived on 11th November 1923. They ended up in Sunnyvale, CA, in early 1924 & by the years end Kahle declared his intention to naturalise & moved to Los Angeles, CA. He got a job as a stills photographer for Pathè. His IMBD page makes excellent reading for the films he worked on, including King Kong (1933), Gunga Din (1939), Citizen Kane (1941), & She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949). More can be explored at: https://m.imdb.com/name/nm0434731/ https://www2.bfi.org.uk/films-tv-people/4ce2bbc7b2526 His daughter, Ursula, married Ensign William Rea Heath, Mercantile Marine, and his medal bar was included in this group. Her obituary makes interesting reading (particularly her story in 1939. More can be read at: https://www.legacy.com/obituaries/lamonitor/obituary.aspx?n=ursula-heath-kahle&pid=177255854 (Above: William R. Heath’s medal bar, including the Atlantic, Mid-East/Mediterranean, & Pacific zones bars) Kahle’s awards and accolades in the film industry can be read where much of this research came from: https://www.google.com/amp/s/ladailymirror.com/2015/02/16/mary-mallory-hollywood-heights-alex-kahle-shoots-the-angles/amp/ (Above: A. Kahle at the Oscars, c.1940s) Alexander Kahle died on 26 August 1968.
    3 points
  22. Hallo, hier habe ich die Abschnitte vergrößert. Folgende Truppeneintragungen sind zu finden: 15.9.1914 9. bay IR Rekrutendepot 10.12.14 10. Komp 9. bay IR ins Feld 27.1.15 ins Feldlazarett 12 Caumes 1.3.15 Ersatz / 9. bay. IR Genesendenkompanie 27.4.15 zum 4. bay. Reserve Infanterie Regiment Nr.4, 7. Kompanie 30.3.16 krank ins Kriegslazarett 3 XIV Armeekorps 30.4.16 Lazarett Schweinfurt 1.11.16 Ersatz / 4. bay RIR Genesendenkompanie 23.5.17 Ersatz / 4. bay RIR 2. Kompanie 30.5.17 Landwehr Infanterie Regiment Nr. 8, 3. Kompanie 5.11.17 zur bayr. Kriegslazarettabteilung 43 versetzt 19.12.17 LwIR 8, 3. Kompanie ins Feld 30.7.18 Ersatz / LwIR 8, 2. Kompanie 14.9.18 Freistellung zur Ablegung des Abiturexamens nach Freiburg, danach nach Marktbreit entlassen Beförderungen: 22.9.15 überzähliger Gefreiter 3.3.16 Unteroffizier Eisernes Kreuz 2. Klasse 2.3.1918 Verwundetenabzeichen 10.8.18 Hello, I've enlarged the sections here. The following troop entries can be found: 15.9.1914 9th bay IR recruit depot 10.12.14 10th comp 9. bay IR into the field 27.1.15 to the 12 Caumes field hospital 1.3.15 Replacement / 9th bay. IR convalescent company 27.4.15 to the 4th bay. Reserve Infantry Regiment No. 4, 7th Company 30.3.16 sick in the war hospital 3 XIV Army Corps 30.4.16 Schweinfurt hospital 1.11.16 replacement / 4th bay RIR convalescent company 23.5.17 Replacement / 4th bay RIR 2nd company 30.5.17 Landwehr Infantry Regiment No. 8, 3rd Company 5.11.17 to the Bavarian War hospital section 43 transferred 19.12.17 LwIR 8, 3rd company into the field 30.7.18 replacement / LwIR 8, 2nd company 14.9.18 exemption to take the Abitur exam in Freiburg, then released to Marktbreit Promotions: 22.9.15 surplus private 3.3.16 NCO Iron Cross 2nd Class 2.3.1918 Wound badge 10.8.18
    3 points
  23. 3 points
  24. Dear collectors. It's Christmas again, this year is an unforgettable year. I have met a few friends in the forum. First of all, I want to thank them for their help and answer my questions. I know that some countries in Europe are not happy now, and I hope that the new year can have a new start. I couldn't open GMIC a few days ago. I don't know when I can't log in here. I also have no way to determine which category my Christmas tree is sent to? So, I put it in the section of the German Empire that I like for everyone to appreciate. I only collect orders established before 1910. Of course, there are several versions of breast stars beyond this time. thanks for watching Merry Christmas
    3 points
  25. The Order of Merit of the Prussian Crown that was awarded to Swedish prime minister Arvid Lindman was sold today in auction for 370 000 SEK which is about 36 000 € plus 22,5% commission. Apparently only 57 ever awarded! See the beautiful pictures here: https://prob.auction2000.se/auk/w.object?inC=PROB&inA=20200526_1458&inO=446
    3 points
  26. He got the Swedish Order of the Sword on August 3rd 1905
    3 points
  27. Unrelated, but I was going through my pics in an effort to help out another member an thought these might be of interest to you, Kriegsmarine Admiral. Unfortunately, no names unless otherwise indicated. Kind regards, Sandro
    3 points
  28. The gartered star - I remember his MMThO being sold at Thies, does anyone know something about this star? If you prefer... Prinzen.
    3 points
  29. Hmm, this is not good, all this suspicion about someone who recently joined and decided to share his knowledge. Many collectors these days don't share, not because they are trolls (as Laurentinu's suggests) but because they want to protect their identity, or because discussion on fora has stooped down to the quality of your average Facebook chat. And yes, I do think Stephan owns Schwarzbook Verlag (as is evident from the watermark on his pics) - but I'm not sure how relevant that is to the question whether or not we should welcome his contributions. I, for one, welcome, Stephan to the Forum. His excellent 3 book series on Braunschweig has been in the works for some time, and its development could be seen on Facebook - I, for one, was alerted to it by our (former) fellow member Medalnet. Welcome to the club, Stephan, and thank you for your contributions sofar, of which I hope to see many more. Kind regards, Sandro
    3 points
  30. Guys, I am going to clean this thread up.... if anyone has a problem with the reason why someone is posting a bar... they have the choice to ignore them. many bars have been saved from obscurity because someone posted them... many interesting discussions have resulted... If you feel people are making money and that offends you... ignore the post. If you feel the need to voice your displeasure, shoot the person a PM, and leave it at that... Best Chris
    3 points
  31. First of all, the long bar doesn't even belong to you in that it's currently for sale somewhere else. And secondly, aren't you the guy who has gotten bars identified in this forum only to turn around and flip them for a hefty profit as "ID'd Bars" somewhere else? Aren't you also the guy who sold the von Schraeder bars to Erik in Slovenia for a tidy sum right after a member here identified it for you? I think you probably owe that member a commission and/or a case of wine for adding serious value to those bars for you. If dealers intend to financially benefit from the research skills of other members here, maybe they should state that information up-front in their posts. Just my two cents.
    3 points
  32. Lt Fraedrich was from IR 155 and from Ostrowo. Olt aD as per EhrenRL. From Posener Tageblatt, 8.7.1918 The Adressbuch Ostrowo 1913 lists a Hermann Fraedrich, Oberzollrevisor, probably his father.
    2 points
  33. Rather a random list. These officers are from several different units. Lt.d.R. Severin Keller was from the bay. Geb.Kan.Bttr. 12, while Lt. Heiko Ohling was from the 4.2.GRFußAR. Lt. Hans v. Winterfeld was from 2.MGK/JB 14, Lt. Friedrich Freimüller was from 1./JB 14, and Lt. Karl Krafft was from 2./JB 14. "Kobeling" is Lt.d.L. Wilhelm Köberling from 3./JB 4. Bauer was an active Lt. in 1./JB 4, whose first name I have not yet found. I have no idea who "Griegheim" is supposed to be. "Arnich" is Arnicke, of which there were two - Lt.d.R. Bruno Arnicke from the 95.RIB staff and Lt.d.R. Erich Arnicke from mob.Et.Kdtr. 326, both born in Finland. "von Zedwitz" is probably Lt. Egbert v. Zitzewitz from 5./3.GUR. "von Poser" is Lt. Hans-Arwed v. Poser u. Groß-Nädlitz from the Saxon Karabinier-Regiment. Lt.d.R. Gerhard Merkel was also from the Karabinier-Regiment. There were actually two Körners and one Koerner in Finland, all three from the Karabinier-Regiment (Lt. Gottfried Körner, Lt.d.R. Rudolf Körner and Lt.d.R. Richard Koerner). "Graf Schimmelmann" is Lt. Theodor Graf Schimmelmann v. Lindenburg from 1./3.GUR, although OLt. Heinrich Schimmelmann v. Lindenburg from 2./3.GUR was also a Cross of Liberty recipient. Lt.d.R. Hans-Wilfried v. Versen was from 2./1.GUR. And last is the aforementioned Lt. Georg Friedrich Graf zu Solms-Laubach from 4./3.GUR. By the way, you can eliminate Wilhelm v. Strantz. I have seen his HPA file. No HT.
    2 points
  34. While doing the research for the Hohenzollern House Order recipients, now and then I came across a notice for an Albrechtsorden recipient, by chance. I wanted to collect these in a separate thread here, might be interesting especially for Deruelle. I had a quick look at the published lists, but have not checked thoroughly whether we have these already. I mostly but not always have the bibliographical information for the notices, will try to provide on request, for those who look interesting. So here they are, in alphabetical order:
    2 points
  35. Very detailed and accurate presentation by Simius. I'd only like to add some corrections about European laws: - by EU law, copyright expires not after 90 years, but 70 years after the author's death. - there are also a few exceptions (allowances) for reproduction, including: reproductions by public libraries, educational institutions or archives for non-commercial use; use for illustration for teaching or scientific research, to the extent justified by the non-commercial purpose; (this would cover militaria and other research forums, IMHO) quotations for the purposes of criticism or review; (mostly for works of literature) use for the advertisement of the public exhibition or sale of art; (that would apply to ebay-sale pictures) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copyright_law_of_the_European_Union And there's important thing that Simius already stressed (bikini case): copyright protects only works of art, with some artistic/creativity/uniquenss added value. That means, a shopping list is no work of art and hence not protected, but a poem, or aphorism, is. Photography must have some artistic value (in broad sense) to be protected by CR; studio portraits fulfill these requirements, but simple document face photo probably not. The same goes for photos of medals etc.: if you just make a picture for illustarive purposes, it has no artisitc value and hence no CR. I'm not sure about casual soldier's photos made in barracs or on the front (I didn't dig into case-law), but i think they should be CR protected, as thy have at least documentary value, like news photos, which are also protected. One more thing to carry in mind with photos of personalities is personal's rights (as part of human rights) - there's a "right to one's own image", which protects ordinary people from being photographed and published elsewhere. There are several exceptions to this rule, i.e. public figures or persons photographed incidentally in public places (i.e. if you take a pic of historical building, or public rally, and there are random perosns in the photo), and I also believe if someone publicly posted a photo of deceised relative for sale or otherwise, he/she tacitly relinquished claims for such rights.
    2 points
  36. Yes it is: Erinnerungsabzeichen an den 70. Geburtstag Wilhelms II. (Hersteller Godet) BTW the portrait of Livonius is NOT the picture of 1812 Overture, it is from my collection.
    2 points
  37. Hptm Müller (IR 51) is Friedrich Alfred Müller, originally from IR 137. Born 25.03.1882 in Weilerbach. Probably the MWB dated 05.Sep.1918 (same date as Majors Nollau & v Sommerfeldt u Falkenhayn).
    2 points
  38. Oh, I beg you, why be surprised... Russia is a republic with a monarchical coat of arms, a secular state with official religious holidays, equality of all faiths and state awards named after Orthodox saints. As they say in Russia - "ing horse-drawn circus". And you don't have to wean yourself from the Soviet one, it will still come back ))) For dialectics!
    2 points
  39. What people collect depends on what catches their fancy; everybody has different interests and therefore a different collecting focus. Some people focus on different types and variations, others only collect decorations in the best possible condition (or the exact opposite: ground-dug awards in extremely poor condition), and others are only interested in awards with interesting stories behind them. You can focus on a certain country, a certain period, a certain conflict, a certain unit, or a certain branch or field. There is no right and wrong way to collect. Collect in a way that feels right for you; it's a hobby and you should ignore everybody who tells you you should do it differently. That being said, most collectors do decide on a collecting focus at some point. I don't know many collectors who simply collect everything. Also, an experienced collector advised me many years ago to always buy the rarest (which would usually be the most expensive) award you can afford. Chances are that a similar piece will not be available anytime soon. You can also spend your money on cheap medals that are a dime a dozen, but those will always be available. Plus, it can be extremely satisfying to find something you have been looking for for a long time.
    2 points
  40. I think there is laurels with the Bulgarian medal Christophe
    2 points
  41. As some of you know, my main focus is on Imperial Eks and I have been fortunate enough to find some rare and unusual examples but my favorite piece in my collection is my s98/05 sawtooth bayo. It was given to me on my 16th birthday by a dear family friend who's husband brought it home on his return from ww1. It's not rare or special in any way except for it's sentimental value to me.
    2 points
  42. A new beauty in the collection, a nice bar with a late Weiss&co BMVO4x, frosty as always.
    2 points
  43. BTW: the bar is turned upside down. The ribbon of the Order of St. Vladimir should go first.
    2 points
  44. The text is: "S(einem)/l(ieben) Toni Kolbesen zur fr(eun)dl(ichen) Erinnerung. 1913. Rebhahn Oberstlt." Obstlt Rebhahn and Oberleutnant-Rechnungsführer Anton Kolbesen served together with Armeeschießschule in 1913. Rebhahn was former officer of IR 92, which had white as "Regimentsfarbe". All fits. I could find Rebhahn last time in Schematismus 1914. He received knight´s cross of Franz Joseph-Orden in 1913 or 1914. Rebhahn received Orden der Eisernen Krone 3. Kl. mit der Kriegsdekoration on 22.11.1914 serving with k.k. Landsturm-Infanterieregiment Nr. 12. He lost his life in the field on 2nd of August 1915 with rank of colonel as acting commander of IR 77 north-west of Lublin. On 27.10.1915 he was posthumus awarded "Ritterkreuz des Leopoldordens mit der Kriegsdekoration". Regards Christian
    2 points
  45. Here a lot of Meyer´s and some more with late award dates (from May till November 1918) kind regards
    2 points
  46. A copper wall plaque for the Hilfskreuzer Thor. Regards,Martin.
    2 points
  47. Regarding Kurt Lange, apparently they got the rank wrong. Then-Leutnant, later Generalmajor, Kurt Lange's father was Geheimer Justizrat Paul Lange in Deutsch Krone, later in Ballenstedt am Harz.
    2 points
  48. The medal set of Colonel Jan Hendrik Sar. One of the 17 Dutch who helped the Albanian forces in 1914. The empty place at the front of the bar was probably occupied by a Knight or Officer grade cross of the Order of Orange Nassau with the swords. He became Knight in this order in 1923 and Officer in 1946 after his retirement. Regards Herman
    2 points
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