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ralstona

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About ralstona

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    Male
  • Location
    New Jersey
  • Interests
    British and Indian Medals

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  1. I've decided to sell this on. I am a Royal Navy collector and this doesn't fit as interesting as it is. I've put it on ebay (US) if anyone is interested. Art
  2. Many thanks. Austrian uniforms are totally outside my area. (Although the navy piece is on theme). I looked closely at the sleeves. I don't know, maybe there were ranks cuffs at some point. Are there any cases where there wouldn't have been any (i.e. warrant officers)? I assuming its WWI as opposed to, say, 1870s. Is there any way to nail it down?
  3. I had originally posted this over in the British section because I thought it was Royal Navy. Thanks to a forum member for properly id'ing it. I hadn't looked at the back of the buttons. (I'm not sure why, I always do.) There are several types: Some say: "A U" and "Qualitat" Others say: "Bruder Schneider Wein" Still others say: "KUK Hof Lieferanten" So a few questions. 1. What date? Obviously before 1918 but more specific than that? 2. No cuff ranks, would there have been any? 3. It has loops for epaulettes. What would they look like? 4. It has loops for two medals. Any idea what they would have been? Not so much which particular medals. I know that's impossible. There are two overlapping stiff cord medal hangers. Would that be for two medals or a bar with more than two?
  4. Taking that close up of the button, it dawned on me to look at the backs of the buttons. I'm not sure why I didn't do that to begin with. Yes definitely A-H. Button say (there are two types): "Bruder Schneider, Wein" and "KUK Hof Lieferanten" I'm going to put a post in the appropriate thread. Thank you Balazs
  5. Interesting. Here is a close up of one of the buttons. This 19th century Royal Navy frock in the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich has six rows of buttons. https://collections.rmg.co.uk/collections/objects/71609.html I had considered that it might be continental. Austro-Hungarian would be interesting indeed.
  6. Hello, I'm looking for some information about this Navy Frock Coat. It has no rank stripes on the sleeve. Doesn't seem to ever have had any. No markings of any kind inside coat. Has stiff cord on left breast for two medals. Shoulders have loops for epaulettes. What era is it from? Any info would be great, thanks.
  7. Interesting points! I have always liked these Medaille d'Honneur. Especially the large ones for marine and colonies. I've always wanted one with an Africa connection (the search continues). I've managed to find a nice early ribbon for it. Sadly I don't imagine St.PetM was high on anyone's priority list so if it got sent out without a name it probably didn't bother anyone. They probably figured it would be so uncommon in the colony that no one would know the difference.
  8. Recent pick up. Medaille d"Honneur 1st class in Silver, Ministry of Marine and Colonies Embossed on Reverse "Incendie du 15-16 Aout 1879" (Fire of 15-16 August 1879) When I bought it I had no information on the details and neither did the seller. Still I sort of knew there was a decent chance of narrowing this one down. My research started with what I knew. A fire in 1879. I reasoned that a "Marine and Colonies" medal for a Fire was likely for a colony and not a marine issue. Even a fire on a ship would not be called an "Incendie". Then the question was ... how many fires in French colonies could have occurred on August 15-16, 1879? Not many, right? Well I was right. I found just one. The New York Times reported a ... "Violent fire that devoured 24 houses along with the ministry of the Interior, the Navy and the Post Office which were totally destroyed." Location: St. Pierre et Miquelon (France's last remaining North American colony. A tiny outpost near Newfoundland, home to the France's Cod fishing interests). Then I found this in the "Annuaire de Iles Saint-Pierre et Miquelon" published in 1900... https://books.google.com/books?id=kdE-AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA175&lpg=PA175&dq="incendie+du+15-16+Aout+1879"&source=bl&ots=8LYfQA_WIl&sig=_a8ZaMhEQkKGGlZVXokC9sCH-WY&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi9_pKS_5XdAhWKt1kKHdujCaAQ6AEwAHoECAAQAQ#v=onepage&q="incendie du 15-16 Aout 1879"&f=false "Recompenses Honorifiques" "Medaille de 1re Classe En Argent" "A l'occasion de l'incendie du 15-16 Aout 1879" Hacala, Sergent-Major du Pompiers Marsoliau, calfat (caulker) Bingo! I suppose I'll never know which of these two men earned this medal or why it was embossed with only the incident and not the name too. (Or why the "Annuaire" only printed their last names). Hacalas and Marsoliaus still live on St. Pierre et Miquelon today. Hacala is a common name there, of Basque origin (as many names are on St. Pierre).
  9. Norvege, Afrique, France, Liberation? Not exactly sure. His Levant has "Levant" and "Levant 1925-26" Art
  10. Just heard back from Jim Kern at the Vallejo Naval Museum. "Please excuse my delay in responding to your email about your very interesting Mare Island flag. Beginning soon after the Civil War, a flag loft was established at Mare Island, purportedly to provide employment for Civil War widows. The flag loft eventually grew to make flags for the entire US Pacific fleet and (with the sail loft) also made sails, canvas boat covers, signal flags, banners, and anything else made of cloth. They also made flags for ships of foreign navies that often came to Mare Island for repairs. There were two British ships that came to Mare Island for repairs during the war, HMS Liverpool and HMS Orion. As near as I can tell, Liverpool departed Mare Island in November 1941 and Orion departed in March of 1942, so your flag could not have been from either of these ships. However, US Navy ships were constantly arriving and departing from Mare Island throughout the war, so they may have brought flags to British ships that were stationed elsewhere in the Pacific. Interestingly, before the war Mare Island even made flags for visiting German ships, as evidenced by the attached photos of a German swastika flag made at Mare island in 1936." This flag is the same large #2 size as mine.
  11. Just picked this up. Royal Navy Ensign marked "Great Britain No. 2" and "Mare Island Feb 1943" on the hoist. Flag is big (Hoist = 7.5 feet, Fly = 15 feet) A bit tattered. It is covered with old repairs. Mare Island Naval Shipyard is in Vallejo, California. The first shipyard on the west coast it was opened until 1996. There was a flag makers shop that produced ensigns for the US navy (and some Allied navies during WWII). The flag shop was staffed by 400 people and included 300 female seamstresses. They produced, among many others, the two flags that flew at Iwo Jima in 1945. I have an email in with the Vallejo Naval Museum to see if they have any more information. I believe the "No. 2" refers to the size. They made sizes 1 - 12, #1 being the biggest and 12 being the smallest. Among the Royal Navy ships repaired at Mare Island during the war were HMS Liverpool and HMS Orion. Any thoughts would be appreciated.
  12. DanEMS, yes I think that is the full entitlement. Chris, thanks. Yes I'd love to get this shown more widely. Any ideas how to do tbis?
  13. Thank you Elmer. I just got these books. Pacchiotti is confirmed as being with the 26th Regiment (they have the AVM entries for all army units in the Italo-Turkish War).
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