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Paul Rosenzweig

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About Paul Rosenzweig

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    Australia
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    paul.rosenzweig@hotmail.com

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  1. Morison graduated as a doctor from the University of Edinburgh, became a Member of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (MRCSE) in 1845, and a Licentiate of the Apothecaries’ Company (LAC) in 1848.
  2. I think I've got the basic General officer ranks sorted: Brigadier-General / Sahayka Rathi / 1-star: a pair of crossed kukris within a rhododendron wreath. Major-General / Upa Rathi / 2-star: a pair of crossed kukris within a rhododendron wreath, plus a moon. Lieutenant-General / Rathi / 3-star: a pair of crossed kukris within a rhododendron wreath, plus a moon and a sun. General / Maharathi / 4-star: a pair of crossed kukris within a rhododendron wreath, with the addition of a vertical sword over the kukris. Chief General (Chief of the Army Staff) / Pradhan Senapati / 4-
  3. As for the first one, yes these are the rank slides for an officer holding the rank of General (4-star) who is appointed as Chief of the Army Staff (Pradhan Senapati). In this case, I believe the rank is still at 4-star level but is known as a ‘Chief General’. The distinction is the vertical sword over the crossed kukris, denoting a ‘supreme commander’.
  4. There’s an important distinction to make regarding the army in Nepal. During the period when the army was under the direct control of the King of Nepal, it was known as the ‘Royal Nepalese Army’ (RNA). King Birendra was Field Marshal and Commander-in-Chief of the Royal Nepalese Army’. In addition, he was Supreme Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces (Atirathi or ‘Grand General’, essentially six-star rank). Following the massacre of King Birendra and other members of the Royal Family on 1 June 2001 and the events which followed, an Act of the Nepalese parliament in 2006 enabled the con
  5. I've had a look through the original China and QSA rolls. All RN numbers of this period were 6 numbers. All RM numbers seem to be 4 numbers with a prefix (PO- etc). There are records of RMA members with low digit numbers such as '54'. The rank "Gnr" appears rarely and when it does there's often no number given. I find it hard to believe that someone would take an original named QSA with RofL bar, and an original named China Medal with RofP bar, or particularly a pair named to the same person, and deliberately erase the name and add a new name. Especially to link it to a WW1 pair to a baker.
  6. Thanks for the comments. It's unusual because on his enlistment for the AIF in 1916 he claims previous service with the Royal Navy. But all the RN numbers were six digits. '54' - which appears on both the QSA and China Medals - is possible to be a Royal Marines number. I would have thought though, that he would have stated his service as "Royal Marines". He appears on his WW1 record as "William James" but when he died he was buried as "James William" so it's possible he was "J Bourke". Here are images of the naming. His AIF number was 11448. Appreciate your assistance. Paul
  7. Are there any experts on HMS Terrible 1900 – and her two ‘relief’ missions? I’m researching a William John Burk who served in the Australian Imperial Force during WW1. His medal group includes the Queen’s South Africa Medal with one clasp ‘RELIEF OF LADYSMITH’ and the China War Medal with one clasp ‘RELIEF OF PEKIN’. On his Australian Imperial Force attestation papers Burk stated he had 3 years’ service with the RN. The two 1900 medals both appear to have been officially renamed in indented capital letters: “54 GUNNER W. J. BURK. H.M.S. TERRIBLE”. To me, this suggests he was a member of th
  8. Thanks for this info. I have a George VI ISM awarded in May 1953 – after the accession of Queen Elizabeth II (on 6 February 1952) but before her coronation (2 June 1953). I guess old stock continued to be used but after the Coronation it would be hard to justify its continued use. Do you know who designed the reverse? Thanks Paul
  9. If anyone is able to help, I've got detailed scan of a stamp on the suspension ring. Thanks Paul
  10. Morison’s name cannot be found in the London Gazette being granted permission, nor is he listed in rolls extracted from the London Gazette . Morrison and his fellow surgeons were indeed “actually and entirely employed, beyond Her Majesty’s dominions, in the service of the foreign sovereign by whom the Order is conferred”, but perhaps the Orders had been awarded ‘in the field’ without formal notification through the usual channels to Her Majesty’s Principal Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs[ii]. This might particularly be the case if it was bestowed on behalf of the Sultan by General Zamoy
  11. Thanks saschaw, that's what I thought. I don't understand how the rosettes come into the picture, but I agree, I think it's 4th Class.
  12. Dr Thomas Coutts Morison MRCSE LSA JP, son of Sir Alexander Morison, volunteered to serve as a civilian Staff-Surgeon during the Crimean War. He died unmarried in 1863 in Rockhampton in the Colony of Queensland (Australia), and apparently among his possessions when he died was a Crimean War period Order of the Medjidie. I'm looking for some information on this from the people that really know the Medjidie. Morison’s insignia is a silver star comprising seven triple quills with seven small crescents and five-pointed stars between them, the whole measuring 43 mm in diameter (one of the tips h
  13. Dr Thomas Coutts Morison MRCSE LAC JP, son of Sir Alexander Morison, volunteered to serve as a civilian Staff-Surgeon during the Crimean War. He died unmarried in 1863 in Rockhampton in the Colony of Queensland (Australia), and apparently among his possessions when he died was a Crimean War period Order of the Medjidie. I'm looking for some information on this from the people that really know the Medjidie. Morison’s insignia is a silver star comprising seven triple quills with seven small crescents and five-pointed stars between them, the whole measuring 43 mm in diameter (one of the tips ha
  14. Morison’s insignia is a silver star comprising seven triple quills with seven small crescents and five-pointed stars between them, the whole measuring 43 mm in diameter (one of the tips has been broken off). Is there any way to distinguish a 4th Class insignia from a 5th Class, just from the star? The gold central disc bears the Sultan’s tughra, the Royal Cipher of the Ottoman Sultan Abdülmecid I, after whom the Order is named. Around this is a gold-bordered circle of red enamel bearing the words in Arabic script for “Devotion”, “Loyalty” and “Truth” and the Islamic year 1268 AH (1852) on fo
  15. Do you know which vessel T C Morison took to come to Port Philip (Melbourne)? Thanks Paul
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