Jump to content

Deelibob

Past Contributor
  • Content Count

    159
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Posts posted by Deelibob

  1. I have recently acquired an 1897 jubilee medal issued to Police Constable James McQueen " CO" Division, recourse to The book Metropolitan Police the Men and their medals reveals  James entitlement to the 1897 medal in the above stated Division but also that he is warrant number 83079 but was formerly 40396, With this in mind I ask if anyone can confirm if James received a medal for 1887 and if so is the issue of an 1897 instead of a bar in error unique or did it as I suspect a common error due to the logistic nightmare of such large numbers of returning Pensioners.

    I would be most grateful for any information on this medal.

    Regards to all and Stay Safe in these strange times

    Peter

  2. Circa 1825 the Liverpool Town was policed by a rather rag tag outfit going under the loose title of the Liverpool Town and Liverpool Dock Police. By the mid century  the crime on the river was becoming out of control  and also the movement of gunpowder and other explosives on the river need to be Policed. In 1865 the Chief Constable got the Mersey Docks and Harbour Company to agree to fund a River Police. The Force was to be funded by the Dock Company but the officers were to be sworn in as Liverpool Borough Constables and administered by the Liverpool Borough Force Chief Constable.

    The River Police wore a different uniform and insignia. Officers wore a Naval refer style short coat, blue pullover with police logo and officers number displayed on front ( and possibly the back ) The Force remained a part of the Borough of Liverpool  right through all changes including the 1880's when Liverpool became a City and the Police became the Liverpool City Police.

    The River Police continued on until the 15th of February, 1920, on which date it was absorbed into the Liverpool City Police proper. For a full overview of this force  please go to the Liverpool City Police website.

    Insignia to the Liverpool River Police is very scarce on the market and in 50 years of collecting I have only seen one Cap Badge and one collar dogs come on the market., I know of two other Cap badges and two Collar dogs  plus a number of buttons in a private collection. There was only ever approx. 14/15 men of all ranks so I am being generous saying they are scarce.

    In 1897 the Liverpool City Police decided to mark the Queens Diamond jubilee with a silver or bronze  medal, this was to be a one off medal but circa 1900/01 the force began to issue similar medals for 20 years (Bronze) 25 years (Silver) and bars to silver medal for every 5 years thereafter. The Original medals bore the effigy of Queen Victoria.

    As the River police were funded solely the Dock Company I did not think that the River Police would be considered for an issue, imagine my delight to see a silver 1897  Liverpool City Police Jubilee  medal to River Police Inspector John Elliott, there was only one Inspector in the River Police  so this medal is unique and I believe that no other River Police officer received a medal.

    John Elliott was born in Weymouth, Dorset, c1845 and in 1851 was living with his Mother Jane ( Widow/Father at Sea ?) at Ivy Cottage,, Common District, Portland, Dorset. John joined the Royal Navy aged 13/14 years and by 1871 was serving as an Able Seaman on the Lord Warden of the Mediterranean Station. Sometime between 1871 and 1881 he leaves the Navy and briefly I believe he became a Constable in a Railway Company police Force but by 1881 he is a Constable in the Liverpool River Police, living with wife, Rose at 28 Canterbury Street, Everton District. !891 he is residing at 61 Gladstone Road, Edge Hill (Where I was born) with his wife Maggie.

    By 1901 he if living beside the River Mersey at 6 Wright Street, Egremont, Wallasey, Cheshire with Maggie. I lose sight of John after this date. During his service John was awarded a silver Marine Medal of The Liverpool Shipwreck and Humane Society for a rescue from the River

    A very rare medal indeed.

    Hope of interest

     

    River Police 2.jpg

    River Police.jpg

    LCP 1897.jpg

  3. Stuart McLoughlin was a Wallasey lad who is buried close to my home. He was killed in Action 38 years ago today. He is commemorated with a CWGC headstone in Rake Lane cemetery and a tablet at the Wallasey war memorial on the Waterfront at New Brighton(Attached) There has been a campaign to have  Stuart awarded a VC for which I believe he was originally considered. I have seen a Female on Remembrance Sundays wearing a Northern Ireland CSM, South Atlantic and Elizabeth Cross and assume them to be Stuarts relatives.

    McLoughlin.jpg

  4. the medals worn by the " Constable " are  Met/City of London 1887 jubilee with 1897 clasp, 1902  and 1911 Coronation medals. The helmet, badge and uniform are not from either Force and my best guess would be photographic or theatrical studio props.

    PS, the cap badge on left is Royal Artillery and that on right appears to be Army Service corps but very blurred, neither badge are local to a particular area.

  5. Just over a week ago I was doing my usual round of on net medal dealers sites when I came across two QEII Police Exemplary Service medals to a husband and wife of the Merseyside Police, Sergt Joseph McLoughlin and his Wife Const Mavis McLoughlin. I quickly purchased this pair and began to investigate. Joseph was born in Liverpool c 1935/6 and probably served world war II. He joined the Liverpool City Police c.1946 and was later promoted to Sgt 8"B" at Prescot Street Police Station and when the designation "B" was given to Bootle in 1967 as a consequence of the Bootle/Liverpool amalgamation. Joe became 8"G"   circa 1972 he became the crime prevention officer at "C" Division and left the Force in 1976. He apparently did not retire. His first wife died in 1972 after 20 years of marriage.Joe was an accomplished Radio Ham. He married Mavis in 1978, this was her first marriage and she was 41 years old.

    Mavis McLoughlin was born in Liverpool as Mavis Heeson c.1938 and joined the Liverpool City Police as 90 "WP" she served with the Women Police up to 1982, like Joe she served in the City, Liverpool and Bootle and Merseyside Police without moving anywhere. Mavis died in 2017.

    I am indebted to Dave Wilkinson for much of this information and photo of Joseph. I was delighted to also obtain a photograph of Mavis taken in 1958 and in conversation with the CC.

    joe McLaughlin.jpg

    Mavis Heeson.jpg

  6. Hi BJW,

    As far as I am aware the W in WPC/WPS was not to be used after the integration of genders in 1986 and would account for the "offending" letter being expunged from the box of issue.

    Regarding use of Police, there are many instances of a Constable not being a Police Constable. Parish Constable, Cathedral Constable, Special Constable Etc. These titles were in existence long before  organised Policing.

    Peter

     

  7. Could anyone assist with information on a Northern Ireland Campaign Medal to

    Pte 24724232 Thomas Robert Herbert Aicken, UDR Died as result of Road Traffic Accident age 23 on 11th August 1987. and is buried in Clandeboye cemetery Bangor,County Down with other family members.

    He is on the Northern Ireland Veterans Memorial and National Roll of Honour but more intriguingly he is also listed on the Armed Forces Memorial which is reserved for those killed on duty or by terrorist action so presumably Thomas was on patrol duties. There is also another UDR soldier killed in similar manner on the same day and may be in same incident :-

    Pte 24457522 Carl Pearce UDR aged 27, buried Redburn Cemetery, Hollywood, County Down.

    They both served in  2nd County Armagh Battalion.

    I have written to local library but to date no information has been forthcoming. I would be grateful for any information or pointers on how to proceed with research in Northern Ireland.

    Thanks

    Peter 

    aicken.jpg

  8. I found the list of Canadian MC/MM winners interesting. For years I had a single BWM to Lt Macagy MC, MM in my swaps tin my wife having bought it for £1.00 at a bric-a-brac stall in the 80's.  I part exchanged it to a dealer in Scotland during 2014 so it is out there. Unfortunately in all the years I had it I saw neither sight nor sound of his other medals which I presume are split up too, but hopefully not.

  9. 8 hours ago, Kvetch said:

    Secondly, truncheons were, on occasion, unofficially augmented with lead.

    Hi Kvetch,

    Welcome to forum. The above is a  bold statement, I have been collecting for over 50 years and never ever seen evidence of such a practice in collecting circles or operationally (In one of the toughest areas of Policing) although I have heard criminal elements boasting of such items being used on them .   I stand to be corrected but would vouchsafe that this idea is stuff of nonsense  and an insult to the professional Police officer of the past.

    I can't think of a more silly idea than a Police officer spending time drilling a Baton, filling it with hot lead/ or bar and then be willing to have such a heavy item  dangle from his waist for a full police shift.

    An Urban Myth in my humble opinion and purely anecdotal

    Regards

    Peter

     

     

     

     

     

  10. Keith has only served for 20 years so can't qualify for longest serving (Yet) but may rank with some of the oldest but I think he is behind many of the old Borough Chief  Constables who remained in post until carried out.

    Upon the amalgamation of Liverpool City Police with Bootle Borough Police the Staff Officer of the Newly formed Liverpool and Bootle Constabulary discovered that many of the Special Constables of all ranks in Bootle were in their 70's & 80's and were "Let Go" in line with the then age limit of 60/65 implemented by L&B.

  11. I don't know if it qualifies but in Liverpool until approx mid 70's there was a 1st, 2nd and 3rd Police Reserve. Those in the First Police Reserve after " Retirement" would simply carry on as Constable's and I had the dubious  honour to meet a really grumpy one in 1970 when he was on enquiry office duty at Tuebrook Police Station of the by then Liverpool and Bootle Constabulary. He was sporting the ribbons of the WWI War and Victory Medal. He had joined the Liverpool City Police in 1919 in response to the call for replacements for the 900 and odd dismissed strikers. If you overlook the fact that he was getting a pension and still Paid as full time Officer that is 51 years + as he served a few years more. My meeting with him did not end well by the way as these old hands did not tolerate Cocky young Officers .But I don't bear a grudge so RIP Mr. R

  12. When the Police Exemplary Service Medal (LS&GC) came into being 1951. All officers serving with the requisite time served (22 Years) got it so if John Hughes joined say 1920'2 and was still serving 1951 then he got the medal. This happened in all forces and Liverpool City Police must have got hit for  hundreds of the awards ( There being over 1000 joining in 1919 alone to bolster ranks after the Strike)

     I work on the assumption that everyone gets 15 minutes of fame (I am still waiting for mine) and so had a look at John  Hughes and he may be one and the same as, John HUGHES, born 10:2:1896,  Son of a  Farmer, David and his Wife Jane living on a Farm at Meifod, Llanrhaido, Denbigh. He probably served WWi and joined the Police on demob. I found that he had served on Anglesey during WWII and resided with his Wife Ann Hughes Nee Jones at 23 Well Street, Amlech, Anglesey. Working on my 15 minutes theory he may well have been serving there in the Borough Force  prior to Amalgamation/s and if so  May have been involved in the Arrest/Aftermath of the Murder of PC Pritchard in 1924.

    Wishful thinking, maybe, but possible and I can find no other  John Hughes who fits the bill.

    Hope of use

    Peter

     

     

×
×
  • Create New...