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saxcob

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Everything posted by saxcob

  1. After having closely examined the original I would now tend to agree. The prussian eagle on the hats suggests that this picture was not taken before 1866.
  2. This seems to be a misunderstanding. Actually only 0.95% of the German population was Jewish (in 1912). 17,3 % of the Jewish population was found to serve in the German army.
  3. I am afraid you are confusing it with the 25 years cross. Your type was introduced in 1913. Thus, there is no early version.
  4. I was not aware of the rarity. There is aculally one currently for sale at a price of about 1.500 Euros. Thanks!
  5. Yes, his name was Lodder. He was Dutch. Very interesting indeed. Please let me know should you advance in your respective research. I understand that the merit cross ("Vasatecknet") was only awarded to foreigners.
  6. The Nassauers did carry their flags at Waterloo. The consequences could be seen until recently when somebody unfortunately felt the need to "restore" them...
  7. Thanks! It is actually a familiy picture; one one the gentlemen is a direct ancestor. Yes, he might indeed have fought at Hougoumont. Since the contribution of the Nassauers had been somewhat neglected, we placed a plaque there in 2015 for the jubelee. SDA is the German version of the GMIC.
  8. Looks like the Saxe-Coburg and Gotha Medal for Art and Science. Extremely rare. 21 awarded in Silver, 9 in Gold (previous type included).
  9. I agree. However, the Nassauers had similiar suspensions (see pictures). It seems you have to sacrifice you scalp hair first ;-).
  10. We can see a Prussian forrester of advanced aged in a group of his (former?) colleagues in the province of Hesse-Nassau. He wears a medal bar with two awards, the first one being with no doubt the Nassau Waterloo medal. The second is a mystery to me. The size hints to a Nassau life saving medal but it did not have a ribbon with stripses but an all red one. For illustration purposes only I also attach a similiar medal bar which lacks the second award.
  11. The right one is the „golden“ cross but the gold plate is almost gone.
  12. The medal bar of a servant to Queen Emma who literally served her until the end.
  13. Hi maxblue, I do share your passion! Here is a very early piece I could recently acquire. It is by Bron whp produced only 40 pieces before he died.
  14. Medal bar of Lucas Roelfsema (1874-1929) who arrived together with Jan Hendrik Sar on February 23rd in Vlora/Albania.
  15. The excellent book stops with the medals awarded in 1890. Thus, it will not help Andreas.
  16. The current discussion on how many battle clasps could be worn by an individual 1870/71 veteran reminded me of sharing images of this piece with you. Otherwise unpublished research of a member (CSForrester) of the German forum (SDA) confirms that the battle clasps with the typical dammage on the "E" were produced by Godet.
  17. Yes, and I have them. However, I am afraid the gentleman on your painting is not to be found among the soldiers listed there since 1. the ribbon is not correct 2. the medal on the painting is way too smal 3. the Nassau medal was not awarded to foreign troops but only to those in the duke's service Do also not forget that for the bigger share of the Napoleonic Wars Prussians and Nassauers were fighting each other (incl. at Kolberg 1807) and probably only joined forces at Waterloo.
  18. I am afraid there is some sort of confusion: - Prussian regiments did not have individual coat of arms but would all display the Prussian eagle on their helmets. - Even pre-1866 Nassovian troops did not have a horse but a lion on their shakos. Maybe you are referring to Hannover? - None of the battles took place in 1813.
  19. Sad. Here is an other Jakob who did not return. He was my greatgrandfather's brother.
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