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As the claim of "holy grail" was recently advanced on another thread, I'll not employ that vocabulary here. But I am tempted. Very tempted!

<b>C 02 VAR -- Best Shooter</b>

The NIB variant of the "Best Sword Hitter" badge (C 02). This is the first one seen, only a rumor unil now. And only two "Good Sword Hitters" are known (and both are in poor condition). Apparently a Mongol equivalent of the Soviet Voroshilov badges, but for swords and guns only -- all Mongols were expected to ride well!

I had the "Good Shooter" version of this badge in my hands earlier today (along with a type 1 Hero, and some assorted KGB, Sukb Baatar, early Red Banner,etc awards). Indeed, there appear to be two variations:

- Good Shooter

- Good Sword Hitter

The Good Sword hitter badge (in reasonable condition considering the age, some enamle cracked/missing but generally OK) was said to have been bought by the dealer in the country side from a local for USD 16 not so long ago!!

Will have some other nice pics to share when back, finally got close to a type 2 hero award (i.e. the "normal" gold hero star) for instance.

Cold in UB, but glad I'm finally here!

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  • 2 years later...

The Badge of the "Best Sword hitter" of the Mongolian People's revolutionary army. The banner has the text "the poof of the world unite". Clearly resembles the Soviet Order of the Red Banner. This badge is made of copper and enamels. Unfortunately much of the enamel is gone but still retains some. Large is size, around 5 cm in height and 4.4 cm in width.

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The Badge of the "Best Sword hitter" of the Mongolian People's revolutionary army. The banner has the text "the poor of the world unite". Clearly resembles the Soviet Order of the Red Banner. This badge is made of copper and enamels. Unfortunately much of the enamel is gone but still retains some. Large in size, around 5 cm in height and 4.4 cm in width.

There is a variation of this badge discussed above in this tread. The badges have the same design except for the inscription at the 6 o'clock position. One variation reads "The best sword hitter" and another "the best shooter".

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Should have posted this years ago, but better late than never. Don't have my notes on me so I'll have to wait with the name and date on this document although it's probably from between 1930 and 1932 due to the latin script at the bottom. Any info is obviously more than welcome.

JC

C 01 doc.

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This is a booklet of the member of the Defense Auxiliary Society of the MPR. The bearer of the booklet, who regularly paid fees to the society, enjoyed some privileges. Most notably, for us, he received this badge.

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Hi fjcp,

I used to study this when I was a kid. I think I could translate it from old Mongolian writing (uigurjin) to new Mongolian (cyrillic) word by word. I could also translate it to English but it won't be as good as Tsend's. If you would like I will translate it to cyrillic.

Chingis

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Hi Chingis,

Thank you very much for the generous offer of your time. I think I speak for all of us here that we would very much appreciate your efforts in translating this, myself in particular.

JC

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