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Imperial Russian Shoulder board collection


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Could this by any chance be Russian? Person who owns them thinks that they are Serbian but for some reason they make me think of Russia (even though I'm clueless when it comes to that field)...

Edited by paja
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Oko, Mollo book is fine, but here is more serious refference on Russian pogoni by another world expert Gerard Gorokhoff, printed in one of few English edittions of the excellent French Militaria magaz

The rest of both articles is on other elements of the uniform, not on the shoulder boards in particular. However, there are some Russian books (in Russian of course) with very detailed schemes (no pic

From the Russian book "Five Centuries of the Russian Military Uniform" peaked caps and shoulder bords of the regiments from the 9th Infantry Division (33rd Eleckii and 34th Sevskii IR form 1st Brigad

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Looks similar to Cavalry/ Scout Imperial Russian Shoulder boards, although I like the design a lot :D

I think the embroidery will be the key :)

Edited by Rogi
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Could this by any chance be Russian? Person who owns them thinks that they are Serbian but for some reason they make me think of Russia (even though I'm clueless when it comes to that field)...

attachicon.gif01.JPG

These are Soviet shoulder-boards, approximately 1947-1953 period. No chance for them to be Imperial pair, sorry.

The shown above single shoulder-board of the corporal of the 5th Pontoon battalion is questionable...

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Ok, but why?

Standard low ranks shoulder-board should have unit abbreviations printed by oil paint. Metall abbreviations and emblems were officially allowed for officers and chief NCOs. However there were many cases when soldiers unofficially used metall insignia. Emblems for various technical troops were introduced in May, 1911 (check this reference please: http://bergenschild.ru/Reconstruction/depot/1912-18/trafaret_pogon.htm ) but in the same order the font of letters and digits of abbreviations was officially changed. Here we see old version (pre-1911) of digit "5" combined with M1911 emblem of pontoon battalions. The button is not correct: pontoon battalions as part of engineer troops should have buttons with double-headed eagle and crossed axes, in white metal. So, several minor inconsistencies result in the general uncertainty. Personally I think that the shoulder-board itself is original, but there is a possibility that metall insignia were added later.

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Aceton: Just smaller objects, but the exhibition closed since then (renovation of the building).

However the Military Museum Museum in Budapest have a wide collection of WWI Russian shoulder boards and cap badges.

Otherwise every changing introduced slowly in the Austro-Hungarian army. For instance the 1904 M cavalry saber the enlisted soldiers recieved first in 1908. It is possible that the Russian army where the changes slow?

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Hello everyone;

My humble contribution to the subject shown below.By the way, the price of this beauty was in US$...Can anyone inform me about reference material about the Russian shoulder boards(погони) in any language(web sites,books etc...)

SAM_6409.JPG

Edited by ЧЕТНИК
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There is a fairly recent book in English on the Imperial Russian army, written by Johan Sommers. While not specifically about Pogoni, there are quite a few shown (many from my collection). There are some big collectors here in the States, but most of the reference material is reprinted German and Austrian intelligence (I have a wartime Austrian manual, which shows all enlisted shoulder straps as of 1917). There are a few references that are reprinted that show uniform schematics from 1910-1911.

Chip

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Are those books available in the States? How much are they? I can read German and some Russian, but not enough Russian to make these books a convenient read without a dictionary handy. I still think the Somers book would be best for exclusively English speakers.

Chip

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