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Hungarian People's Republic Awards


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seb16trs,

I will vouch for anything that you get from Zsolt (croma222) as being original. Hungarian medals made during the 80s, as has already been mentioned, used cold enamel which is subject to damage much easier than the earlier hot enamel pieces. If you are unfamiliar with telling cold enamel pieces from hot enamel here is a tip that will help you date the piece. In the 80s the trifold ribbons hs=ad a piece of metal inside the folds to help the ribbon maintain its shape. They also had a pin device at the top of the back of the ribbon. Any piece with a ribbon as mentioned above would have cold enamel and may have some enamel damage but not always. I have also mentioned in earlier posts that Hungarian medals suffer very rough handling by dealers in the flea markets and get danaged from this rough handling. That has nothing to do with the quality of the enamel. Just the way some dealers through the medals in a box without any care for presereving the pieces value.

Regards,

Gordon

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hello, my orderis identical in its finition to this piece! do you understand now my first remark? ;)

No. And, here, I do not even remotely know the meaning of "finition".

Please, let us stay a forum of "gentlemen".

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No. And, here, I do not even remotely know the meaning of "finition".

Please, let us stay a forum of "gentlemen".

Must I assume I didn't start a gentlemen discussion while speaking of "finition"? I don't know how to interprate your last sentence...

I believe there's a problem of vocabulary from my part, as I'm not english-born. I should have used the word "finsih"; this is my mistake. About "enamel finish" and "enamel default" I am speaking of possible cases of enamel slightly flushing over the rims or medal sculptures. In specific countries and specific periods, such a detail would invalidate a medal (soviet orders are in general perfectly finished), in others it is a normal detail and default are even a part of authenticity (Bulgaria for example).

To all: thanks for yours inputs. 80' hungarian orders are not as perfect as those of the previous years. About Croma, I can only be happy to have found a reliable dealer, attested as so by many collectors. :)

Edited by seb16trs
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Hi Richard -

As memory serves me the central theme is the "coat of arms" for the Architects "Guild" - or Epitesz Mernok (Building Engineers) - From the date and the style (like the Order of Merit of Hungarian Freedom) - I am making the assumption that this was for awarded for rebuilding after the war.

No, Gents, this medal has no connection either with architects or with rebuilding the country. This is a medal which was instituted in 1949 and awarded until 1952 to elementary school pupils younger than 14 years. This is the "FOR EXCELLENT LEARNING" medal. Here is the medal with the metal strip on its ribbon, which says "JÓ TANULÁSÉRT" = "FOR EXCELLENT LEARNING".

jo-tanulo_www.kepfeltoltes.hu_.jpg

Regards,

cimbineus

Edited by cimbineus
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Interesting!! So this was a student's medal?

Elementary school at that time meant the basic and compulsory education from 1 to 8 classes for children from 6 to 14 years. In Hungary we called them pupils. This medal was to acknowledge their achievements in the learning process.

cimbineus

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cool! So the "grade" depended upon ones' scholarly performance? did the gold go to children who got high scores?

There was just one grade, this gilded medal, but because of the poor quality you basically can meet only severely worn down medals. It is a relatively rare medal, I have to say.

Edited by cimbineus
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Cimbineus - was this symbol used on the elementary schools only? My earlier assumption was from a medalion that I found which had the symbol in the center, but it was for an Building Engineering School? Thanks for straigtening this one out!

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Cimbineus - was this symbol used on the elementary schools only? My earlier assumption was from a medalion that I found which had the symbol in the center, but it was for an Building Engineering School? Thanks for straigtening this one out!

Hello Gents,

These symbols, the book, the triangle, the bows, hammer, the quill-pen in different combination appear relatively often on badges and medals of those times, especially in connection with different sciences or education. So, one can meet those on different badges and medals for educators, innovators, inventors, pupils and students, jurists, journalists and some others. In some cases these symbols appear on the badges and awards of certain organisations as well, but usually those are also connected to the above mentioned spheres of activities, so, theoretically one cannot exclude that these symbols could be on badges of some schools too.

These symbols prevail on the badges and medals of one specific organisation of the early '50s, i.e. "MUNKAERŐ-TARTALÉKOK HIVATALA" or "MTH", ("OFFICE OF LABOUR RESERVES"). Although it was not a ministry, but all its competences were equal to ministry level decisions. So, de facto it played a role of a ministry.

Regards,

cimbineus

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Good morning gents

My interest is WW2 Allied related medals. I have come across the Order of Hungarian Freedom as being awarded for resistance to Nazi rule.

I have seen several for sale so was using this thread for help, when I came upon this version which I could not see has been mentioned before. If the picture is too small, here is the link to where I found it.

http://www.icollector.com/Medal-HUNGARY-ORDER-OF-HUNGARIAN-FREEDOM-MAGYAR-SZABADS-Aacute-G-Eacute-RT_i6022327

or alterantively

http://forum.valka.cz/topic/view/114241/Rad-Madarske-svobody

Dave

 

Hungary.jpg

Edited by Shots Dave
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Dear Dave,

Well, this was the first governmental/presidential order of the Hungarian republic founded on 10th May 1946. The piece in the picture is the first type of the order, the so call "Jesus Christ" type, because the two five-edge stars around Kossuth's head remembers the crown of thorns which was placed on the head of Jesus during the events leading up to the crucifixion of Jesus.

toviskoszoru.jpg.7fd7999976520f6f51f9213846bb7d59.jpg
The orders were numbered with continuous numeration without any logic or special meaning, not separated ever the two grades. It had a special ribbon, not in accordance with Hungarian traditions.

egyben-700.thumb.jpg.aebdfd768b82b6d30980f4243570201a.jpg
This first type was awarded on five occasions to allover 505 Hungarian and foreign citizens in two grades: silver (~66%) and bronze (~34%). (By administrative mistake nine persons received it twice.)

egyben-hata-700.thumb.jpg.fba0085ea8bec8d858130e8faba34adf.jpg

So, the order you showed us is a correct one, but on a wrong ribbon and in a latter case.

krisztgusfejes_doboz_2_www.kepfeltoltes.hu_.thumb.jpg.392c983374860654a3081022da85327a.jpg
Later that year, in December 1946, they changed the order and introduced the 2nd type already in better quality but without numbers, and all previous orders of the 1st type should have been replaced by new ones. The ribbon became a traditional triangle-type one. From December 1946 only the 2nd type of the order was awarded.

tok-nyitva-600.thumb.jpg.c1ae1b83698cff2b360096cb75bdfba4.jpg

Regards,

cimbineus

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