Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I would say the Territorial Force War Medal.

Only 34,000 medals were awarded. The criteria for award was very strict.

To receive it men had to have had 4 year Territorial Service by 30 Sept 1914. They must have also served overseas between 4 Aug 1914 and 11 Nov 1918. Also those who qualified for 1914 & 1914/15 Stars were excluded.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

I do not collect medals for their own sake but I am an inveterate collecter of all things WW1, whether picked up from the battlefields themselves or from Collecters fairs in France or GB.

But I am confused by three precious little pieces of bronze known as 'Mons Stars'.
One, Court mounted as part of a trio with an unadorned ribbon, one single with the date bar on the medal ribbon and the last and my favourite a dirty battered example with a very threadbare ribbon. On it is sewn a dirty but silver rosette.

A question for all you medal collecters out there, what is the correct way to wear the bar/rosette arrangement? Was it like our Falklands medal - the rosette signifying being 'under fire'?" (Not my idea but a bar room expert's theory).

I could imagine that being the case because they are all to the RAMC.

Barney

Edited by Barney
Link to post
Share on other sites

There are two types of Star.

The first is the 1914 Star. In the centre is the number 1914 with Aug Nov above and below. This was issued to those that served in France or Belgium between 5th Aug and 22 Nov 1914 (the Old Contemptibles). In addition those that had actually been under fire during this period were entitled to a bar on the medal (5th Aug-22nd Nov 1914) to signify the bar on a ribbon bar a rosette was worn, (this should only be on the ribbon bar not on the actual medal ribbon).

The second star is the 1914-15 Star (pictured below) this was identical in design but has just 1914-15 in the centre. This was issued to those who served in any theatree of war between 5th August 1914 and 31st Dec 1915 and who were not already entitled to the 1914 Star.

Be a little wary of these medals are there are a few fakes out there. Even more faked is the 5th Aug-22nd Nov 1914 bar and in fact originals are now hard to come by.

Edited by Chairman
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...

It was also popular (albeit incorrect) practice for recipients of the 1914 Star to embellish their ribbon bars with rosettes to denote the difference between their medal and the more prolific 1914/15 Star. Likewise, recipients of the Aug-Nov (Mons) clasp sometimes wore the rosette instead of the actual clasp directly on the ribbon. The clasps had to be applied for, but rosettes were available from most regimental tailors and outfitters.

The 1914 Star has a contemporary tailors' copy clasp. It's actually of better quality than the issue item, and far simpler to attach - being a slide-on affair.

Edited by Tony Farrell
Link to post
Share on other sites

I would say the Territorial Force War Medal.

Only 34,000 medals were awarded. The criteria for award was very strict.

To receive it men had to have had 4 year Territorial Service by 30 Sept 1914. They must have also served overseas between 4 Aug 1914 and 11 Nov 1918. Also those who qualified for 1914 & 1914/15 Stars were excluded.

I would agree. My wife's grandfather (a 1913 Territorial) went to France with the 15th London Regiment and qualified for a 1914-15 Star trio. He emigrated to Canada, and in the Second War joined the R.C.A.F. in his civilian trade of tailor. Throughout his service he wore a ribbon bar with the trio ribbons plus the TFWM ribbon - no one called him on it! From correspondence it sems he tried to claim a TFWM and Efficiency Medal, but both claims were rejected. Even with double time for war service he was still short.

Edited by Michael Johnson
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...

I have always understood that the rosette signified "under fire" in 1914. I was told this by an "Old Contemptable" himself in 1974/75.

The bar was to be worn on the Star with ribbon & the rosette on the ribbon when it was worn without the Star, they signify the same thing - being within range of German light artillery between the relevant dates - "under fire".

Medal Index Cards refer to "Clasp & Roses" as being issued - one bar (it is more properly termed a bar rather than a clasp as it is a sew - on bar & not a slde on clasp) & two rosettes being issued.

That's it from pedants corner........

Other than that I have an original form for claiming thebar & rosettes - it lists the units qualifying for them & could be picked up at the post office - the one I have was that of a member of 1st Northants Regt & the Machine Gun Corps, I have a few documents & photos of his - but not his trio. unfortunately.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Blog Comments

    • Sounds great other than the Orange & Mango squash only because I prefer cran-pomegranate juice.
    • "(...) disgusting herbal concoction (...)" I took note of this description, to enrich my otherwise limited, English "Wortschatz"...
    • At work the standard indian tea such as PG tips is referred to as chimp tea. This goes back to the days when we had a Spanish girl working for us whose command of the English language was extremely limited. One lunch she said she was going to the shop could she get anything. I asked if she could get a pack of tea bags. She returned with some disgusting herbal concoction. I tried to explain what was required but without success. I then remembered PG tips had a picture of a chimpanzee on the packe
    • When I read Lapsang Souchong i decided to post something about these Tea . Many years ago I dont  know about Lapsang until I read James Michener book Centennial and the description of the savour of the Lapasang as a mix of tar and salt & smoked made me proof . It was exact ! and i liked it since then .
    • I have been known to drink Lapsang Souchong and Tea, Earl Grey, Hot... both "without pollutants". I normally have one mug of coffee in the morning, then spend the rest of the day drinking Orange & Mango squash (by the pint). Then evening comes and it's a pint, followed by red wine with dinner and sometimes a drop of Laphroaig afterwards.
×
×
  • Create New...