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German army pocket tool set


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Hello,

Can anyone tell me anything about this pocket tool set or the maker (Bonsa)? The DRGM number as well as maker can be seen on the parts. The handle (looks like a penknife) has a faint eagle and swastika on both sides.

Does anyone know anything about these or which unit would have used them?

Cheers

Tony

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That's very possible David, the little eagles and hooked crosses do make things sell. Luckily I didn't notice that till after I bought it although it was at a militaria fair so I assumed it was WWII. I just thought it may have belonged to someone in the same sort of trade as me.

Tony

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  • 4 weeks later...

Interesting tool set, but IMO not ww2 Military issue .

BONSA =Bontgen & Sabin,

cheers

Gary

Thanks Gary, at least I now know a little more about the maker. I reckon it was probably made in the 20s or 30s but haven't a glue what for.

Tony

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Tony,

I noticed on one of the tangs it has a number then the word registered in english, I am assuming that the number it the pattern number are the other items numbered? also as it is worded in english I would think its an export item, the leather straps on the inside reminds me of how some british leather items are finished anyway it certainly is an interesting kit

cheers

Gary

PS Bontgen & Sabin was still producing items post war until about 1970 I think

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Tony,

I noticed on one of the tangs it has a number then the word registered in english, I am assuming that the number it the pattern number are the other items numbered? also as it is worded in english I would think its an export item, the leather straps on the inside reminds me of how some british leather items are finished anyway it certainly is an interesting kit

cheers

Gary

PS Bontgen & Sabin was still producing items post war until about 1970 I think

Gary, that's the DRGM number. I don't know if registered would mean it's an export piece as 'copyright' and 'made in' are found in English on wartime items too. Admitedly books and plates though. But I may well be wrong.

Still, I could sell it as an escape kit captured from a member of the SOE while she was repairing a damaged strut of the Lysander that had just arrived to take her back to London :rolleyes:

Tony

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Still, I could sell it as an escape kit captured from a member of the SOE while she was repairing a damaged strut of the Lysander that had just arrived to take her back to London :rolleyes:

Tony

Tony let me know if you do decide to part with them as old tools I collect, could you post images of the outside of the pouch?, are there any other markings on pouch? and are the DRGM numbers the same on each item (116827) ?

Edited by woody
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A couple more pics Gary.

There aren?t any markings whatsoever on the pouch and the knife is the only piece with the DRGM number, but the press stud buttons have CS stamped on them.

If I ever get rid of it I?ll give you a shout.

Tony

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