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Gentlemen,

Please take time to view the two videos in this Mail on Sunday news-sheet, which gives you a birdseye view of what it's like for the modern infantry in Battle. Taken fighting the Taliban in Afghanistan, with helmet mounted cameras, I think you'll agree that there is no questioning their bravery and it makes our nations "celebrity/sporting heroes" look like a bunch of overpaid tosspots.

Graham.

http://www.mailonsunday.co.uk/pages/live/a...e#StartComments

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Gentlemen,

Please take time to view the two videos in this Mail on Sunday news-sheet, which gives you a birdseye view of what it's like for the modern infantry in Battle. Taken fighting the Taliban in Afghanistan, with helmet mounted cameras, I think you'll agree that there is no questioning their bravery and it makes our nations "celebrity/sporting heroes" look like a bunch of overpaid tosspots.

Graham.

http://www.mailonsunday.co.uk/pages/live/a...e#StartComments

Apart from 1982 when we got an un-naturally broadcast version of war the UK sailor, marine, soldier and airman gets a really bad press without any understanding of the low standards of peace-time support given to the underpaid volunteer in this country (I've had many a "conversation" with 2yr conscripts who spent their time "in Catterick" who think we have it easy these days)

I volunteered in 1981 at the age of 16 - I was in the Falklands in 1982, did my commando course at the end of the year, was in Northern Ireland the same year and back again in 1984/1985, involved in 1st Gulf and managed to survive 17 years in but we still have those that think 39/45 was the end of all "real" service

I have the utmost respect for ANYONE who volunteered to serve and also for those who served their country regardless of which conflict they were in but I think we need to remember the Ballad of Tommy Atkins and recognise all those who do the things we don't want to do any more

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Apart from 1982 when we got an un-naturally broadcast version of war the UK sailor, marine, soldier and airman gets a really bad press without any understanding of the low standards of peace-time support given to the underpaid volunteer in this country (I've had many a "conversation" with 2yr conscripts who spent their time "in Catterick" who think we have it easy these days)

I volunteered in 1981 at the age of 16 - I was in the Falklands in 1982, did my commando course at the end of the year, was in Northern Ireland the same year and back again in 1984/1985, involved in 1st Gulf and managed to survive 17 years in but we still have those that think 39/45 was the end of all "real" service

I have the utmost respect for ANYONE who volunteered to serve and also for those who served their country regardless of which conflict they were in but I think we need to remember the Ballad of Tommy Atkins and recognise all those who do the things we don't want to do any more

I'm reminded of the Ballard of Tommy Atkins (please search it online as I don't have time at the moment) which pre-dates the First World War and sums it up perfectly

I'm a bit biased as I've been on the wrong end of a WWII late-entry conscript with home-service only who swore blind that anyone called (or volunteering) to the colours after 1945 didn't do real service (I'm a 17year volunteer)

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The Ballard of Tommy Atkins

Rudyard Kipling ? 1892

I went into a public- ?ouse to get a pint o? beer,

The publican ?e up an sez, ?We serve no red-coats here.?

The girls behind the bar they laughed an? giggled fit to die,

I outs into the street again an? to myself sez I:

O it?s Tommy this, an? Tommy that, an? ?Tommy go away?;

But it?s ?Thank you, Mister Atkins,? when the band begins to play-

The band begins to play, my boys, the band begins to play,

O it?s ?Thank you Mr Atkins,? when the band begins to play.

I went into a theatre as sober as could be,

They gave a drunk civilian room, but ?adn?t none for me;

They sent me to the gallery or round the music-?alls,

But when it comes to fighting?, Lord! They?ll shove me in the stalls!

For it?s Tommy this, an? Tommy that, an? ?Tommy wait outside?;

But it?s ?Special train for Atkins,? when the trooper?s on the tide-

The troopship?s on the tide, my boys, the troopship?s on the tide,

O it?s ?Special train for Atkins,? when the trooper?s on the tide.

Yes, makin? mock o? uniforms that guard you while you sleep

Is cheaper than them uniforms, an? they?re starvation cheap;

An? hustlin? drunken soldiers when they?re goin? large a bit

Is five times better business than paradin? in full kit.

Then it?s Tommy this, an? Tommy that, an? ?Tommy ?ow?s yer soul??

But it?s ?Thin red line of ?eroes? when the drums begin to roll-

The drums begin to roll, my boys, the drums begin to roll,

O it?s ? Thin red line of ?eroes,? when the drums begin to roll.

We aren?t no thin red ?eroes, nor we aren?t no blackguards too,

But single men in barricks, most remarkable like you;

An? if sometimes our conduck isn?t all your fancy paints,

Why single men in barricks don?t grow into plaster saints;

While it?s Tommy this, an? Tommy that, an? ?Tommy fall be?ind,?

But it?s ?Please to walk in front, sir,? when there?s trouble in the wind-

There?s trouble in the wind, my boys, there?s trouble in the wind,

O it?s ?Please to walk in front, sir,? when there?s trouble in the wind.

You talk o? better food for us, an? schools, an? fires, an? all:

We?ll wait for extry rations if you treat us rational.

Don?t mess about the cook-room slops, but prove it to our face

The Widow?s Uniform is not the soldier-man?s disgrace.

For it?s Tommy this, an? Tommy that, an? ?Chuck ?im out, the brute!?

But it?s ?Saviour of ?is country? when the guns begin to shoot;

An? it?s Tommy this, an? Tommy that, an? anything you please;

An? Tommy ain?t a bloomin? fool - you bet that Tommy sees!

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