Jump to content

My British Headdress Collection **RECOMMENDED**


Recommended Posts

On 31/01/2010 at 00:46, Stuart Bates said:

And another. These forage caps are among my favourite pieces of headgear. This one to the Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment( Sherwood Foresters).

 

It has a beautiful blue enamelled badge.

 

This regiment was formed in 1881 with the 45th Regiment (Nottinghamshire) becoming the 1st Battalion and the 95th Regiment (Derbyshire) becoming the 2nd Battalion

 

3rd Battalion was formed from the Chatsworth Rifles, or 2nd Derbyshire Militia

 

4th Battalion was formed from the Royal Sherwood Foresters, or Nottinghamshire Militia

 

5th Battalion from the 1st Derbyshire Regiment of Militia

 

 

 

DerbyshireSherwoodForesters.jpg

 

On 31/01/2010 at 00:46, Stuart Bates said:

And another. These forage caps are among my favourite pieces of headgear. This one to the Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment( Sherwood Foresters).

 

It has a beautiful blue enamelled badge.

 

This regiment was formed in 1881 with the 45th Regiment (Nottinghamshire) becoming the 1st Battalion and the 95th Regiment (Derbyshire) becoming the 2nd Battalion

 

3rd Battalion was formed from the Chatsworth Rifles, or 2nd Derbyshire Militia

 

4th Battalion was formed from the Royal Sherwood Foresters, or Nottinghamshire Militia

 

5th Battalion from the 1st Derbyshire Regiment of Militia

 

 

 

DerbyshireSherwoodForesters.jpg

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 278
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Stuart, Well, that cover's something different! Presumably it was designed to reflect the sun as well as to protect the neck. Wearing a helmet must have been incredibly hot ,even with this. Would t

Posted Images

It has been a while since I last posted and thought that I would share a recent acquisition. This cap, circa 1880, to a Colour-Sergeant of the Governor-General's Foot Guards - an Ottawa, Ontario based regiment, was found by a friend at an estate sale in Phoenix, Arizona. It was advertised as an "Eastern Star, Masonic Order Lad's Cap".  It shows that rare items can show up anywhere.

GGFG forage cap.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Fascinating badge on that second cap!  I've never seen such a thing before but I suppose it makes sense, as presumably the GGFG could be supposed to represent or contain men from all the provinces then in Canada, though I notice PEI didn't make the cut.  Thanks for sharing.

Link to post
Share on other sites

GGFG IMG_9842a.jpg

The six points of the Star represents the provinces of Canada at the time of the Regiment's formation - 1872.  This is the first time I had seen this badge so large as it was a common collar badge.

 

Edited by servicepub
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Blog Comments

    • I like my tea strong enough for my spoon to stand up in. My father got me into it. When my father was at RAF Dum Dum 1943-47 most of his fellow officers drank ice cold drinks to mitigate  the heat, his Sikh batman warned him against it and said that strong hot tea would cool him down, most certainly did. So years later in the UK when everybody else was drinking iced drinks on a baking day the wood family was inbibing copious quantities of hot strong brews of Assam's finest. P
    • Hi ccj, Thanks for your comments. Funny how, for me at least, coffee has become a habit more than a conscience choice. It's the old, "Well if you having one (coffee) pour me as well". When I get together with my son-in-law, a former Brit, it's tea all the way. Thanks again. Regards Brian  
    • I live and grew up in the south (USA) and the drink of choice 7 days a week was cold sweet tea. I was unaware Lipton was British because that’s what most southern use for brewing tea. When I joined the army I learned most people in the north and western parts of the USA drank unsweetened tea and that was perplexing to my young brain. Now days I can’t stand sweet iced tea but it’s still the most common drink in the south, but, you can get unsweetened ice tea in the south. Im familiar with ho
    • I drink tea every day (Chinese tea), I used to buy Sri Lankan black tea at the fair before, it was great! I have been reluctant to drink them all. . The tea I’m talking about is just brewing water, not adding other substancesI
    • Thanks for your reply Patrick, just in case some might not know what the Belgian WW1 Medal you were referencing looks like I have included one here. I understand that the small crown on the ribbon denoted the recipient was a volunteer.  
×
×
  • Create New...