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Masonic Medallions


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The reverse.

Silver Gilt & Blue Enamel Masonic Jewel "North Wales" 1921,inscription to reverse "To Wilfred from Cyssu Xmas 1921,showing Compasses enclosing an open book with two equilateral triangle"s with point"s downwards

Edited by bigjarofwasps
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A nice pair of masonic items. The Masonic connection to the Great War is (at least) two fold. First, a lot of Mason's served in, and died in, the war. Second, the main Masonic Temple in London, called the Freemason's Hall (on Great Queen St., if my memory serves) was dedicated to (I believe) all the WWI dead (maybe just Masons), but I'll have to find some additional books to verify that. The Grand Lodge of England, the governing body of English Lodges around the world, decided to offer Mason's the silver medal you have, at a price, which was a donation to help pay the the Great Queen St. building. It is not a Masonic Victory medal, as is sometimes seen on lists. It only commemorates the dead of the war, and went to help pay for the building as a memorial. I have a couple of books that I don't have access to at the moment, so I may be able to add more at a later date.

As far as the name and number on the medal, the name is the Mason who donated to the Hall, and the number is his Lodge. I have checked a list I have of all Masonic Lodges in the world in 1933 and cannot find #704. Also, assuming the two items came together, and that they might belong to the same person, I checked for a "North Wales" lodge, and found none. It's possible 704 closed between 1919 and 1933, and it would not appear in the book. I think I might have an earlier edition, but I would think we must have a couple of brothers in the ranks who might be able to find a copy of "List of Lodges Masonic" for 1919 or thereabouts. That would give the location, and possible allow more research. U.S. Masonic research is practically impossible, but I've had some success with UK Lodges through friends who can check local resources.

The symbol on the jewel is that of an officer, but the English system is different that the US and I don't recognize it.

By the way, the Freemason's Hall is open to the public, and is a great building to see, even without a Masonic connection. I would also consider contacting the Hall and asking about the location of #704. They have been helpful to me in the past, and also have a research library that was open to the public (at least in 1988.)

hope this is of help. I'll add more if I can find anyting.

FireMedals

Edited by FireMedals
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Thanks Firemedals,

That is really interesting, I look forward to hearing from you again, if you should turn up any additional information. I`ll certianly contact the Freemason`s Hall when I return to Wales.

I don`t think that the two medals are connected in any way?

Thanks again for all you time and help.

Kind regards,

Gordon. jumping.gif

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Guest WAR LORD

The explanation of the medal, properlly known as a "Jewel", is in essance corect. The Grand Temple was to be a memorial to those Masons who had fallen in the Great War. To enable in part the construction of this it was decided that a Charity Jewel would be avalable to tose Masons who gave a set sum to the fund. This was then to be worn as an outward reminder of this gift. To this was added the opertunity of Lodges to raise money in like manner. This was then to recieve a kneck award, this was or is on a light Craft blue band, that would be worn by the master at cerromonys, both in the Lodge and when visiting. These lodges also held a special title, which if memory dose not fail is Stone cross. The medal is particularly well struck and interestingly has a smoked effect, not dissimilar to the Blood Order.

Edited by WAR LORD
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Thank you very much for this information WarLord. It is really interesting.

I have just come across another one of these medals. They certainly are of very good quality. I`m thinking about starting to collect them.

I assume that they are no longer readily available?

Are there any books on Masonic Medals available?

Here is the most recent medal I`ve found....

A solid silver Masonic medal(Lodge No.1295) presented to Brother A.E.Tunley.

The back of the medal is inscribed BRO. A.E. TUNLEY NO. 1295.It has a full set of hallmarks for Birmingham 1926/27 and the retailer's mark - J.R.GAUNT,LONDON.

I would also be interested to know the name of the publication which gives the name of all the lodges, that relate to the numbers? Anyone any ideas?

Edited by bigjarofwasps
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Guest WAR LORD

You are quite correct. The name is Hall stone jewle. Masonic Jewels are very interesting and are on the whole extreemly well made. Collecting these is much underestimated.

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Many thanks guys for all you information on this subject. It is very interesting.

Am I right in thinking that any Brother could contribute to the construction of the Grand Temple, or was it the Lodge that made the donation and the Grand Master who wore the Hall Stone Jewel?

Are these Jewels still made and sold, or are the only ones in existance the originals?

I`ve done a small amount of research on the 704 Jewel and have discovered that it came from a house clearance in Kent, so that would fit in with the Camden Lodge theory.

Any ideas on the 1295 Lodge.

I assume that Lodge 1 would be the first Lodge, which is the oldest Lodge still in existance?

Edited by bigjarofwasps
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Guest WAR LORD

A number of points here. The oldest Lodge as I know id 83 which is the Issack Newton lodge. The Hall Stone jewel was given by donations to the individual lodge that in turn gave to the Grand charity which then awarded the jewel. In the case of the Lodge, the members raised to money and the Lodge gave to the Grand charity. This then in turn was granted the status of a Hall stone lodge. In this case the jewel is still worn by the master. In the case of the individual I have presumed that the honour died with the recipient. BUT as few sons follow directly in the masonic steps of there father, the case of the wearing of the jewel by the son in the same lodge after the death of the father is a bit unsure. In the case of my father he wore the jewel after his fathers death along with his grand charity jewel. So many anomalisies can arise. Masoni medals are a very obsure research prodject.

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Guest WAR LORD

Thanks Don. These are pics of the building of the Grand Temple. Taken in 1930. I hope this gives some consept of the grandure of Great Queens Street as it is also known. Hopefully we might have more threads on Masonic decorations.

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Guest WAR LORD

The Hall stone Jewel was only awarded during the time. You can get issuded items, but you can not get the awarded piece.

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In 1919 Grand Lodge decided to build a new headquarters for the English Craft as a memorial to the many brethren who had given their lives during the First World War. An appeal was made to every member of the Constitution for contributions to the fund which were entirely voluntary.

Contributions were recognised by special commemorative jewels. Personal jewels being awarded to any member of a Lodge subscribing ten guineas or more; a Lodge jewel to be worn by successive Masters of lodges contributing on average ten guineas per member, such lodges to be known as Hall Stone Lodges. (Ten guineas at present day value is approximately ?380).

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Guest WAR LORD

The masters Jewel, in this case a unique item, doble award. Special Grand Lodge authorisation for the bestowal.

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