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Hi all,

I bought this a few days ago, for ?130 ($250 ish). My first and only one! It came from a friend who bought it off a guy at work, who in turn was given it by his Grandfather, who had brought it back from WW2. I will find out the unit when he goes back to work. Unfortunately, the blade is well worn down as it had been used in the garden for 50 years! I selfishly (silently) cursed the old boy, but then, he earned it, so therefore he's entitled to do with it what he wished.

The blade is detachable, but I'm not too sure what the spike is for. Also marked on the spike is, " R,B,NR." and underneath it "0/0561/0019".

And no, it's not for sale, I'll be buried with it!! :rolleyes:

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Nice one John!

My father-in-law had one too and used it almost every day till he died. He laughed me out of the living room when I told him how much it would cost to replace it (he wouldn't give it to me and I think it was buried with him as it's gone).

There's a similar sort of spike on the British clasp knife too, like you, I don't know what it's used for.

Tony

Edited by Tony
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Hallo Gents :beer:

I believe the spike was used to open knots in the chute rigging cords which may have become entangled upon landing, it would double as a can opener, but as for a combat weapon, well the blade was there for that. :P

I have been told that the complete item contravenes current German laws with regards legal knife regulations, BUT, you can have them as two seperate items, i.e, blade and handle. :unsure:

I attach a shot of one in a friends collection in Bavaria, and even more rare a shot of a WW2 Italian Para Knife. :love:

Kevin in Deva.

Edited by Kev in Deva
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post-3-1166986794.jpg

That is a corker! Yes...yes...the blade is worn down but, for me, that just adds to the attraction of this lovely piece of memorabilia. The spike was indeed intended for unpicking tangled rigging lines. These knives were also issued to Luftwaffe aircrew although it seems that the bulk of the production was diverted to the Fallschirmtruppe. I'd rather have this example than a mint one. It's a bit like the Berghof spoon I saw a while ago, liberated by a French soldier: he'd carried on in the army until the late 1950s and used the spoon as his daily eating tool. So it is worn down on one side. Wonderful! Not unlike the Agincourt-era pikeman's helmet in the IWM in London, converted into a cooking pot. Same vibe. I don't have a WW2 gravity knife but I have the Bundeswehr one I swapped a woolly-pully for when I was doing my BW para wings. Same sentimental value.

Nice one! Real pleasure to see something like this.

Happy New Year to everyone!

Prosper

Edited by PKeating
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Kev,

Nice Italian fighting knife! They were based on the MSVN 'daggers', which were inspired by bayonets, and were also informed to some extent by the so-called German "boot knife". Your knife is just the kind one sees tucked into the smocks worn by members of the Folgore. I know of one of these in London, brought back by a now-deceased Nettuno veteran. I've been after it for years.

P

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Kev,

Nice Italian fighting knife! They were based on the MSVN 'daggers', which were inspired by bayonets, and were also informed to some extent by the so-called German "boot knife". Your knife is just the kind one sees tucked into the smocks worn by members of the Folgore. I know of one of these in London, brought back by a now-deceased Nettuno veteran. I've been after it for years.

P

Hallo PK :beer:

Just to clarify all the knives pictured belong to my buddy, Boris, in Bavaria, he told me he picked up the Italian knife on a local Bavarian "Floh-makt" about 10 years back for 50Dm :o or about 25 euro now.

Kevin in Deva. :beer:

Edited by Kev in Deva
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Thanks guys,

I really enjoyed the info. I'm so pleased to finally get one. And Kev, I would like to see some nice pictures of your Italian Fighting Knife. Those don't do it justice...

Regards,

John :cheers:

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  • 2 months later...

John,

The "R. B.Nr" (Reichs-Betriebs-Nummer) is a Luftwaffe code assigned to factories and workshops serving the war economy until 1945.. The maker mark (or logo) is usually found on the blade... this, of course, now worn away on your example.

This one of mine is by "SMF" the most commonly found maker of these knives.

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How many types / makers of garvity knives were there, please?

Cheers,

John

"German Military Fighting knives 1914-1945 "(G. A. Hughes)is still on front of me. Needed for a post early this evening.

I' afraid it only shows one item, but there is an appendix with makers of fighting knives in common. If you want me to, I'll post it.

Kind regards,

Jef

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"German Military Fighting knives 1914-1945 "(G. A. Hughes)is still on front of me. Needed for a post early this evening.

I' afraid it only shows one item, but there is an appendix with makers of fighting knives in common. If you want me to, I'll post it.

Kind regards,

Jef

And of course some explanation....

Jef

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 1 year later...

Hi Kraut,

nice Flieger-Kappmesser

Here is my father's - I lost it once, found it again - only to give it away, but I got it back after 24 years in a friend's collection.

File0008-5.jpg

Edited by Naxos
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