Jump to content

Recommended Posts

  • 2 weeks later...
Guest John Sukey

The purple heart as originaly established by Washington was an award for military merit, and was made of cloth. One example is known.
It was only when it was reestablished that it was awarded for wounds recieved.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Basically, its the same as the army one, except its to the police, the only differance is that its got a sheriffs star instead of George Washington. To win it the Officer has to be injuried whilst upholding law and order, and has to have medical treatment, i.e stitches, or broken bone, etc, etc. I think its the Califonia Sheriffs Dept, that issue it. I`ve never seen one, come up for sale. I`ll see if I can dig a picture out and a bit more info.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 6 months later...
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

Good mint engraving.

Until 1942 a number of Purple Hearts were also awarded as "merit" decoratons to both soldiers and civillians; one was awarded to a Pacific island native who captured a Japanese pilot. Recently the criteria were changed so as to NOT allow civillians to be awarded the medal (see link above). Some civillians were given the award in Viet Nam as well as WW2. This change is because award of a Purple Heart is now all that is necessary to obtain entrance and full care at a V.A. (Veterans' Adminstration) hospital.

Edited by Ulsterman
Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice update folks.

Scott, what unit was your Grandfather in? It would be nice to know his history. It does annoy me in UK that not enough is done to remember the sacrefices made for the freedom that we live in today. I'm glad that your Vets are generally looked after across the water. :food-smiley-004:

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Nice update folks.

Scott, what unit was your Grandfather in? It would be nice to know his history. It does annoy me in UK that not enough is done to remember the sacrefices made for the freedom that we live in today. I'm glad that your Vets are generally looked after across the water. :food-smiley-004:

He was in the 2/120th of the 30th Inf divison,went ashore June 15 1944,fought in the hedgrows until they were stalled in St Lo. operation Cobra was to be the breakout of St Lo. It was sucessful,but on two seprate days allied bombing killed 60 men because the smoke to mark enemy lines blew back onto the allied lines.He was killed in the opening moments of the operation =(

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 years later...

Criteria was recently updated to include non wound/bleeding injuries to the head. Under the new rules of the Army, soldiers suffering traumatic brain injuries, such as concussions, during roadside bombings in Iraq and Afghanistan are now eligible to be awarded the Purple Heart.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Criteria was recently updated to include non wound/bleeding injuries to the head. Under the new rules of the Army, soldiers suffering traumatic brain injuries, such as concussions, during roadside bombings in Iraq and Afghanistan are now eligible to be awarded the Purple Heart.

I'm pretty sure such wounds have always been eligible. As the original War Department General Order stated, the Purple Heart was open to one with a "wound which necessitates treatment by a medical officer and which is received in action with an enemy..." They probably had a problem with people trying to claim Purple Hearts for wounds which were little more than scratches, so they began cracking down and focusing on how penetrative the wound was. This would have had unintended consequences for some with traumatic internal injuries, so they had to revisit the criteria to make sure deserving recipients weren't accidentally excluded.

In WWI, the PH could also be awarded for "meritorious service" I dont know what the requirements were for such an award though.

The Purple Heart wasn't created until 1932. When adopted, those eligible were those who had received a wound chevron or those who had been awarded a Meritorious Service Citation Certificate by the AEF. Those who received a Citation Certificate for heroism were eligible for the Silver Star, also created in 1932. As noted above, there was also a rule for eligibility for those who might not have had a wound chevron, but could document having been wounded. Sometime early in World War II, they changed the rules to eliminate the meritorious service awards (around the same time they created the Bronze Star?). It wasn't until 1943 that the Purple Heart was extended to the Department of the Navy as well (with retroactive elegibility).

A story which may or may not be true is that the Purple Heart was originally only going to be for meritorious service, but the Army Chief of Staff, Gen. Douglas MacArthur, realized that while he would get a bunch of Silver Stars for his many citations for heroism while serving with the 42nd Division in World War I, he wouldn't get any Purple Hearts. So broadening the pool of eligibility to include those wounded or killed while doing their duty just happened to benefit him. I suppose this story would be appealing to critics of MacArthur who viewed him as a glory hound.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm pretty sure such wounds have always been eligible. As the original War Department General Order stated, the Purple Heart was open to one with a "wound which necessitates treatment by a medical officer and which is received in action with an enemy..." They probably had a problem with people trying to claim Purple Hearts for wounds which were little more than scratches, so they began cracking down and focusing on how penetrative the wound was. This would have had unintended consequences for some with traumatic internal injuries, so they had to revisit the criteria to make sure deserving recipients weren't accidentally excluded.

The Purple Heart wasn't created until 1932. When adopted, those eligible were those who had received a wound chevron or those who had been awarded a Meritorious Service Citation Certificate by the AEF. Those who received a Citation Certificate for heroism were eligible for the Silver Star, also created in 1932. As noted above, there was also a rule for eligibility for those who might not have had a wound chevron, but could document having been wounded. Sometime early in World War II, they changed the rules to eliminate the meritorious service awards (around the same time they created the Bronze Star?). It wasn't until 1943 that the Purple Heart was extended to the Department of the Navy as well (with retroactive elegibility).

A story which may or may not be true is that the Purple Heart was originally only going to be for meritorious service, but the Army Chief of Staff, Gen. Douglas MacArthur, realized that while he would get a bunch of Silver Stars for his many citations for heroism while serving with the 42nd Division in World War I, he wouldn't get any Purple Hearts. So broadening the pool of eligibility to include those wounded or killed while doing their duty just happened to benefit him. I suppose this story would be appealing to critics of MacArthur who viewed him as a glory hound.

Thanks Dave! I never understood what grounds qualified as meritorius service. This makes more sense.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

It maybe of interest to know, that there is a Purple Heart, availalbe to Police Officers was well. If your interested, I`ll dig out the Criteria for it?

I think there are many types, for various state and local police forces across the US. I have myself seen several ones.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

The Criteria for the award for the purple heart is AR 600-8-22. The PTSD issue is a dead horse... the TBI is considered acceptable under the following criteria. Enhanced MRI showing ischemia or scar tissue ( indicative of a closed head bleed), Loss of consciousness greater than a Mild Grade three concussion when caused by an enemy generated explosion. Chapter 2-8 of the Awards Regs covers it.

Vaughan101.jpg

Edited by Doc Wilson
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 6 months later...

The Texas National Guard has thier own Purple Heart Medal. The concept of the medal was developed in August of 2001 after two Texas Guardsmen were killed in a vehicle rollover accident in the aftermath of clean-up operations for Tropical Storm Allison that devastated southeast Texas in June 2001. The original intent for the TXPH was to have a State medal to award to Texas Soldiers and Airmen who are killed or injured during disaster relief operations like floods, tornados, fires, etc. However, 9/11 happened and the original purpose of the award morphed and the medal became a redundant/duplicate award to the federal Purple Heart, meaning that the recipient of the TXPH must meet the same criteria as the federal award. The medal was approved by the Texas Legislature on May 2, 2007 in House Bill # 2897. The medal bears resemblance to the federal award with a few changes. The ribbon has a white stripe down the center; the effigy of George Washington is replaced by the Texas State Seal; and the Alamo adorns the top of the planchet instead of a Washington Coat of Arms.

Edited by John F.
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Blog Comments

    • Sounds great other than the Orange & Mango squash only because I prefer cran-pomegranate juice.
    • "(...) disgusting herbal concoction (...)" I took note of this description, to enrich my otherwise limited, English "Wortschatz"...
    • At work the standard indian tea such as PG tips is referred to as chimp tea. This goes back to the days when we had a Spanish girl working for us whose command of the English language was extremely limited. One lunch she said she was going to the shop could she get anything. I asked if she could get a pack of tea bags. She returned with some disgusting herbal concoction. I tried to explain what was required but without success. I then remembered PG tips had a picture of a chimpanzee on the packe
    • When I read Lapsang Souchong i decided to post something about these Tea . Many years ago I dont  know about Lapsang until I read James Michener book Centennial and the description of the savour of the Lapasang as a mix of tar and salt & smoked made me proof . It was exact ! and i liked it since then .
    • I have been known to drink Lapsang Souchong and Tea, Earl Grey, Hot... both "without pollutants". I normally have one mug of coffee in the morning, then spend the rest of the day drinking Orange & Mango squash (by the pint). Then evening comes and it's a pint, followed by red wine with dinner and sometimes a drop of Laphroaig afterwards.
×
×
  • Create New...