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Antonio Prieto

EQUATORIAL GUINEA

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I have this images of some Medals of Equatoroial Guinea

All the reverse, blank

BRONZE MEDAL, MILITARY MERIT

MILITARY MERIT, NECK BADGE

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Very interesting. is there a maker on the back?

They are similar to modern Argentine awards.

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Missed Ulsternam's 2007 query.

Cejalvo of Madrid had at least two contracts [early and mid 1980s] to produce Equatorial Guinea decorations. Pins on the reverse of two of the above stars suggest Spanish workmanship. In 1996, a Malabo source informed that decorations would be manufactured in Paris, presumably by Bertrand, but no solid confirmation of that ever received. Burke implies that Bertrand made insignia for the National Order, at least.

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Thank you again

Searching for info and images of:
Medalla de Santa Isabel
Medalla del Patronato de Indígenas de Guinea Ecuatorial
Medalla de la provincia de Fernando Poo
Medalla de San Carlos
Medalla de la ciudad de San Fernando de la provincia de Fernando Poo
Medalla de la ciudad de Bata
Medalla de Río Muni
 

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Might this insignia be from Equatorial Guinea during the reign of Franciscp Nguema  1973-9179 when he used the rooster as the national symbol? Its quite large.absolutel no idea of what it would have been used for, but came with a collection of other African badges.567080350de59_image(1).jpg.711c05f60b3dc

Edited by westernhighlander

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The colours on the central shield are arranged as are those on the flag of EG and the rooster is clearly an emblem of the country, so I'm sure you're correct in your identification.  Is there anything on the back of the badge which suggest it's possible use?  Loops to pin it to a hat or piece of clothing or bolts which would allow it to be attached to plaque or wall?  

What size, roughly, is it?  Anything under  2 inches [5 cm] might be a badge.  Over that size it's more likely to be a decorative plaque of some sort.

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Its a little over 5 inches in length ( see attached photo). It is allso curved ( see attached). The curvature would fit a cylindrical form such as the upper arm just below the shoulder or cylindrical headgear such as a fez ( as oppesed to a spherical helmet). If worn on the arm, perhaps some sort of guard or parade unit similar to the metal arm badges worn by Spanish Regulares/Spanish Legion.

image.jpg

image.jpg

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