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I just wanted to share my new item what I got few days ago.

Order of the Glory II class :jumping: .

9738712_whtg.jpg

9738705_gGE2.jpg

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Dear Timo,

really nice & authentic :cheers: .

Thick variant :unsure: ?

Best regards :beer:

Christian

Edited by Christian Zulus

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Nice order, my congratulations!

Here are the scans of the same Glory as it was back in 2004.

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Interesting!

I think I prefer damaged enamel to repaired.

Although, I have seen some stunning repair jobs that are undetectable!

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Interesting!

I think I prefer damaged enamel to repaired.

Although, I have seen some stunning repair jobs that are undetectable!

Dear Belaruski,

for my taste the Glory 2cl looks now better with the enamel repaired :D .

The job had been rather well finished, I think.

Best regards :beer:

Christian

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The huge scan is yummy! Like Belarusky, I prefer items kept in the conditions they were.

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The huge scan is yummy! Like Belarusky, I prefer items kept in the conditions they were.

But the vast majority of the Red Army veterans had been used to the habit to get their damaged orders repaired ;) .

Awards had been very important in the everyday life in the Soviet Union. So, most of them had been kept in good shape.

Just my opinion :unsure: .

Best regards :beer:

Christian

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But the vast majority of the Red Army veterans had been used to the habit to get their damaged orders repaired ;) .

That is correct. However, sometimes our veterans overreact in their efforts to keep their awards bright and shiny for annual parades. They polished them heavily every year and the results vere pretty dramatic :(

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A shame someone mucked with the enamel on that one. On some things (very few) I am a conservative (conservationist?).

boohoo.gif

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That is correct. However, sometimes our veterans overreact in their efforts to keep their awards bright and shiny for annual parades. They polished them heavily every year and the results vere pretty dramatic :(

Dear Andrew,

we - as collectors - can be happy, that 99,9 % of the veterans didn't "overpolish" their orders ;) .

Best regards :beer:

Christian

BTW: I think, that even during the GPW the soldiers got their orders repaired - Nevsky, OPW, etc. -, when they got damaged - and specially for the "Victory Parade" ;) .

Edited by Christian Zulus

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A shame someone mucked with the enamel on that one. On some things (very few) I am a conservative (conservationist?).

boohoo.gif

Dear Ed,

I have to admit, that looks really a bit rather strange or even "perverted" ;) .

Best regards :beer:

Christian

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I think, that even during the GPW the soldiers got their orders repaired - Nevsky, OPW, etc. -, when they got damaged - and specially for the "Victory Parade" ;) .

Normally, higher was the rank and position of the officer, more chances he has gotten to repair his damaged award. For example, this sophisticated repair was not possible in trench conditions.

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Repairs and damage (even modifications) done by the recipient are one thing; "repairs" (or "restorations") done by later custodians (including dealers) are something else entirely!

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Guest Darrell

Repairs and damage (even modifications) done by the recipient are one thing; "repairs" (or "restorations") done by later custodians (including dealers) are something else entirely!

That there lies the problem. If we hadn't seen the "before" pictures who would have ever known it was not repaired by the original owner? :rolleyes:

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Repairs and damage (even modifications) done by the recipient are one thing; "repairs" (or "restorations") done by later custodians (including dealers) are something else entirely!

I think the same way like you Ed and I have to disagree on the subject with you Christian.

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Anyway, I got it, like it is on the picture and I must be happy with that..... and I am of course!! :cheeky:

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We have no (or little) control over what others do to the things that come to us (though, if we know, we can strive to avoid monkeyed-with items). We do have great (almost total) control over what WE do to the items in our custody.

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iv got noors glory in hand and actuly there a nicely done repair job done on the enamel in the same place as in the secand glory posted! intresting that the damaege is in the same place!!!

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To restore - or not restore ...

Gentlemen,

we have touched a crucial question :jumping: .

In understand the argumentation of Ed and Bryan: Restoration "yes", but only ordered by the receipient (=veteran) of the order. Restoration "no", when ordered by museum, collector or dealer.

I started collecting as early as in the mid of the 1970s: Fine arts, european paintings of the period around 1900 (orders & medals are still a smaller part of my collection). In the Fine-Arts-Business we let restore, have to restore and have to do that from time to time. O.K., oil paintings or differnt to awards from metal & enamel ;) .

What I want to say is, that the topic "restoration" is absolutly no question in most of the fields, that have to do with collecting visual arts. O.K., we don't but "new hands" to an ancient sculptur ;) .

The question is, if the restoration of an order - done by museums, collectors or dealers - is legitimate or not :unsure: ?

AND, as Darrell pointed out, who can tell, who has done the repair, if there are no photographs, like in Noor's case?

Well, I am totally not sure about that topic and have to admit, that Ed's arguments are strong ones.

It would propose to collect some pro & contras and find then a decision in our collectors community :D .

Best regards :beer:

Christian

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doh!!!! other case of paddy should read the post PROPERLY!!!!!!!very well done on the enamel!!!!

Edited by paddywhack

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doh!!!! anycase of paddy should read the post PROPERLY!!!!!!!very well done on the enamel!!!!

Dear Paddy,

I already posted, that I like Timo's ("Noor") Glory 2cl and the repair work.

If I would look out for a Glory 2cl, it would Timo's item prefer actually to the Glory 2cl, which Igor offers since yesterday for USD 780,- (researched, thin variant, but with some queer silver & gold wash on it - maybe also some enamel repair at "SLAVA"): http://www.collectrussia.com/DISPITEM.HTM?ITEM=16954 .

Best regards :beer:

Christian

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