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WW1 Victory Medals General Discussion


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For those who ask me this question, what is the different between re-issue and the late or later issued medals.

From my book:

Late Issue - With depletion or shortage of existing supply of the original medal or clasp, such a medal or clasp may be a slightly different manifestation of the original due to the use of different manufacturers and/or the availability of the original dies and hubs. It is the sanctioned replacement for the original issued medal.

Re-issue - is an original issue medal which has been re-issued at a later date for a different event without any changes to the medal’s overall design. A good example is the U.S. National Defense Service Medal, first issued in 1950-1954 for the Korean War and re-issued again in 1961-1974 during the Vietnam War. This medal continued to be re-issued for at least three different campaigns or events after 1974.

Edited by johnnymac
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To those who purchased my book, "WORLD WAR I, VICTORY MEDALS" I want to thanks you, as I have just reached 400 copies sold to date. I have been asked to do this book in a Kindle. Some collectors said that they then can carry the book when attending shows. If you are interested in seeing a kindle printing, please send me a PM here at GMIC massaging. Please do not full up the posting area.

Another question is why no hard cover? Simply put, it was the cost to you and me, as I would have had to pre-purchase 1500 copies with me having a very limited way of reaching the world market and I would have eaten a lot of books at $$$, my cost per copy.

Thanks you, Jim

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We lost all the photos for reference!?

unfortunate!!

Lambert

​I believe the server/website update continues.  Images have not been "lost" and will reappear to all posts once the update is completed. 

Please, see Nick's announcement on the update: http://gmic.co.uk/index.php?/announcement/1-new-forum-upgrade-please-read/

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Hi All I am a new collector in this field as previously collected Victorian Indian/Raj swords .Looking forward to sourcing as many as the different medals within this group so here is my humble begining .I will post each separate medal within its own section 

 

WP_20150410_12_49_04_Pro.jpg

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On ‎10‎/‎13‎/‎2015‎ ‎6‎:‎50‎:‎25‎, davidck said:

Does anyone have any tips on the best way to polish medal?  I'm looking into making a display for mine.

Hello David,

I am not sure of what others will suggest but my simple suggestion is 'do not polish your medals'.  Any form of polish will inevitably lead to wear on the medal, possibly leave residue behind on the planchet, and will degrade any lustre, especially if is a silver medal.  The least destructive method of cleaning is to simply wash the medal in warm soapy water and then ensure it is completely dry.  Using gloves will also prevent the application of any ill-timed fingerprints.

Hope this is of use.

Regards,

Rob

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The question of cleaning or not cleaning is always a controversial subject. Many collectors,, especially of British Victorian medals seem to value medals with a dark patina (ie. with a coating of dirt and pollutants) while other collectors, especially of WWI and post-WWI medals are very divided on the issue, some leaving them the way they are found while others clean them in order to have them as your friendly RSM would appreciate them.  I generally clean all medals with a light soap and water wash and possibly a silver dip (but never polish them) as my experience as an officer in the 1960s impressed on me that a soldier never wears "dirty" medals or insignia.

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I've cleaned a few items from time to time but usually it depended on exactly what the issue was.

- If actual corrosion was happening (I/e: zincpest, verdigris, rust) I would gingerly try to remove it with something softer than the base metal and then use something like alcohol or in some cases vinegar to stop the process, though you have to watch out what anything acidic will do to the metal or finish.  This usually prevents the metal from further deterioration.

- If its only dirty or polish residue, then a simple soft toothbrush with warm water will normally remove anything.  This should always be the first resolution IMO.

Polishing and even silver dips actually remove surface material, even minutely and over time you lose surface finish and details.  If a piece has been inappropriately cleaned in the past, sometimes you need to dip it again so you can start over, though you lose any aged patina.  Usually, I do not recommend this, though I have seen some use commercial products like "Tarn-X" and that can often give a false patina and even change the coloration of the finish.  Then, you have to decide what you want to do.

Tim

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About 2 years ago I purchased a Victory Medal that was in a bad condition due to verdigris and I accidentally left it in my pants pocket and she who must be obeyed put it through the wash.....  When it came out it was as clean and shinny as if it was brand new.....  I got in he** for putting through the wash but since then I have used a pair of old grey wool work socks and put some WW1 Victories and WW2 Stars one in the sock at a time and it has worked.....

 

Mike

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There is now a Type III British officially-issued Great War Victory Medal that has been discussed on the Great War Forum.  It was issued in May 2015 (along with a BWM) to the next-of-kin of a British soldier whose BWM and VM had been returned by his mother and never re-issued.  Unfortunately it appears as if the issued medals (see below) do not look any better than some of the current reproductions.

27 Greer May 2015 reissue copy.jpg

Edited by Gunner 1
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