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Odulf is correct. It is a late set of medals belonging to Prince Hendrik who died in 1934.

@ Paul Wood. Prins Hendrik received his Royal Humane Society Medal for his behaviour in 1907 when the Harwich ferry/boat "Berlin" stranded near Hoek van Holland. The ship broke in two and due to the Prince's coördination a lot of people could be rescued from the ship.

regards

Herman

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@ Paul Wood. Prins Hendrik received his Royal Humane Society Medal for his behaviour in 1907 when the Harwich ferry/boat "Berlin" stranded near Hoek van Holland. The ship broke in two and due to the Prince's coördination a lot of people could be rescued from the ship.

regards

Herman

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Herman

I really like your WWII, Netherlands Indies and Korean War set.  Did the recipient receive his WWII British medals and choose not to add them to the medal bar, or was it not allowed by the Dutch authorities?

Regards

Brett

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Hi Brett,

 

Dutch military personel who fought in the British Forces in WW2 were awarded British campaignmedals. These were not allowed by the Dutch Government for wearing because the Dutch Government instituted the War Remembrance Cross with clasps for WW2. (the second from the left in the group, with the green orange ribbon). No double decorating was allowed by the Dutch authorities.

 

Nowadays however double decorating is normal. If a Dutch soldier serves for 6 months with a UN force he (or she) receives 2 medals; a Dutch one and an UN one.

Herman

 

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Thank you for replying, Herman.  That medal bar would look spectacular if the British medals were added!   The man concerned must have had a very interesting military career.  Do you know his name?

Regards

Brett

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Hallo Saxcob,

a nice miniature bar. What is the size of the medals? It should not be difficult to get the missing miniature cross for important war actions (kruis voor Belangrijke Krijgsverrigtingen), to complete it.

Regards,                                                                                                                                                                                             Pieter

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Hi Saxcob,

I was thinking of the so-called Prinzen size (25-27 mm) which was used in the Dutch East Indies army, as the medals were often worn daily on the uniform. Your set is an example of this. This size of the cross for Important War actions is not so difficult to find. Best regards,

Pieter

Edited by pieter1012
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While my collection does not focus on Dutch orders/medals (my focus is Mongolia, Albania and a few others), I did want to get something Dutch in my collection and I'm pleased with what Santa brought me for Christmas: a second half of 19th century Military Willems Orde 4th class with original ribbon and cased with reference to M.J. Goudsmit as the manufacturer.

Appreciate any comments/corrections.

 

 

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For Goudsmit it should have a MG+ in a rectangle.

Most often in the ring for the ribbon, sometimes in the attachment between medal and crown. But probably there you'll find a sword - the general marking for silver.

I used to have a website on the subject but it is outdated now. If you want to part with the medal do let me know :) it is a sound period example of around 1900/1920. The letters on the malteze cross are metallic inside of the enemal. Earlier examples would have gilt painted lettering on the white enamal.

Regards, Erik

mwo.ht10.jpg

mwo.ht11.jpg

Edited by erikscollectables
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