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3 German Soldiers killed in Afghanistan

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Yesterday a German foot patrol was the target of a Taliban suicide bomber in the northern Afghanistan town of Kundus.

http://www.dw-world.de/dw/article/0,,25433...isch-335-rdf-mp

Three German soldiers were killed and five (not 3 as told in the link) wounded, two of them seriously. The wounded are on their way to Germany with an Airbus MEDEVAC plane of the Luftwaffe.

Beside the Germans there were also 6 Afghans killed and 12 wounded.

It seems this will be the end of the service in the "quiet" northern province. There is NO peaceful place in Afghanistan anymore :unsure:

greetings

eitze

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Very sad news!!!

Made even worse by the fact that they were supposedly serving in an alledged quiet part of the country. It seems that like in Iraq, there are no front lines.

I believe that Prince Harry was supposed to be going to serve over there instead of in Iraq, I wonder if this will change that plan?

Just out of interest are these soldiers the first German soldiers to be killed in action since WW2?

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My respects to the dead....now maybe the German government will change their ROE's and be a little more aggressive, not knock other nations who are at the sharp end of the stick.

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Hallo Gents, :cheers:

Not to put a downer on this story but I believe they had left their Armoured Personel carrier to go shoping in a market.

Vigilance is the watchword, the Taliban were obviously waiting for this and had a suicide bomber lined up ready for a chance.

Hi BJOW, Twenty-one German soldiers have lost their lives in Afghanistan since 2002, including the ones killed on Saturday.

May They All Rest In Peace.

Kevin in Deva. :cheers:

Edited by Kev in Deva

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Not to put a downer on this story but I believe they had left their Armoured Personel carrier to go shoping in a market.

Vigilance is the watchword, the Taliban were obviously waiting for this and had a suicide bomber lined up ready for a chance.

That is right - our soldiers wanted to support the local Afghan dealers by buying technical equipment on the market, instead of flying in all the stuff from Germany and that is their way to say thank you :mad:

I don`t know what we are doing there. It is time to call our soldiers back home. Let the Afghans kill each other, instead of our people :violent:

greetings

eitze

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I'm very sorry to hear this. May they all rest in eternal peace. This has made me wonder, what does the German government for the family in this case? Is there a '57 gold wound badge given to the next of kin? What is awarded when a German soldier distinguishes himself in combat these days?

Dan

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This has made me wonder, what does the German government for the family in this case? Is there a '57 gold wound badge given to the next of kin? What is awarded when a German soldier distinguishes himself in combat these days?

Dan

That is the next sad news - the answer to all three questions is: NOTHING :speechless1:

We have no decoration for wounded or for bravery. They only got the campaign medal with clasp and that`s it!

The only Army decoration is the Honour Cross (Gold-Silver-Bronze) and the minor Honour Medal. But these are general purpose decorations, awarded here in Germany and abroad for all and nothing.

On 07.07.2003 a suicide bomber crashed into a German Army bus on its way to Kabul airport.

Casualties were 4 dead and 29 wounded. I have to say it is a shame, but some of these wounded still have their files at court against the German Government for propper pay- and treatment as WiA`s !!!!!!!!!!!

That`s the truth with the German Army today!

greetings

eitze

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Not to get into politics, but it seems that way for most nations and wars for the 20th Century. Once the soldier has done his bit and paid for it with a debilitating wound (or an arm or leg), the government no longer needs them and just casts them aside. Look at the bonus marchers (WW1 vets) in the US who camped out in Washington in the 30's. They were dispersed with a cavalry charge. Sorry to get off topic but this angers me to no end.

Dan

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