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Hi,

whats that in the left breast

Thanks

Chris

Under the RAF pilot wing is a ribbon for the Air Efficiency Medal for Officer's and a MID device. I'll try to resize some more images. I do get tired of trying to get the correct size photos. I need lessions... :unsure:

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A very unusal way of mounting an MID, It should be on a ribbon, I think of the 39-45 medal ribbon, then I would expect to see more ribbons for service in WW2. Is the tunic dated?

Regards,

Pete

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A very unusal way of mounting an MID, It should be on a ribbon, I think of the 39-45 medal ribbon, then I would expect to see more ribbons for service in WW2. Is the tunic dated?

Regards,

Pete

That is the way a MiD would be worn if it were awarded without a corresponding ribbon to place it onto. Maybe there was just no ribbon, maybe there was just no ribbon yet. An unfortunate by product of having a 'put it on a ribbon (if any)' award. Leads to some outrageous medal mounting styles with the lonely orphaned MiD soldered on at the end.

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Thanks ED,

From Wikipedia,

In the nations of the British Commonwealth, soldiers who are mentioned in despatches receive a certificate and are entitled to wear a silver oak leaf (from 1920?1994, it was bronze, in the Canadian Forces it still is) on the ribbon of the service medal issued to soldiers who served in a conflict. If no campaign medal is awarded, the oak leaf is worn on the left breast of dress uniform.

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I've run into several cases where RAF officers mounted the oak leaf on a piece of uniform fabric and worn that in place of a campaign ribbon, rather than sewing the device directly to the uniform, as was done here.

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I've run into several cases where RAF officers mounted the oak leaf on a piece of uniform fabric and worn that in place of a campaign ribbon, rather than sewing the device directly to the uniform, as was done here.

Yes, I have a BD to General Miles that has a MID device sewn on a ribbon made of material similar to the BD itself. I also have a ribbon bar with the last ribbon of drab material to look like the tunic with a MID device attached. There was no ribbon to attach the device to until war's end.

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More infor on the uniform set

RAF blouse and matching trousers worn by Wing Commander G.F. Anderson. Blouse dated 1942 marked 'Air Crews Blouses Size 6'. Complete with Wing Commanders rank braid to epaulettes with embroidered 'A' above for Auxiliary Air Force Service. Embroidered RAF pilot's wings. Air Efficiency Award medal ribbon bar below wings with oak leaf palm for Mention in Dispatches.

I don't know anything else about Anderson. I'd like to but have but haven't found anything.

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Nice battledress :cheers:

Is the whistle AM marked?

Dave

Dave,

No, the whistle is not AM marked :( That's the way I received the blouse and I have left it that way. It's a plastic whistle... :unsure:

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Wing Commander Gavin Forsyth ANDERSON.

I found a few London Gazette entries. AUXILIARY AIR FORCE RESERVE OF OFFICERS-GENERAL DUTIES BRANCH in all cases.

LG 35114 21 Mar 1941

Flight Lieutenant Gavin Forsyth Anderson (90110) is promoted to the rank of Squadron Leader (temporary) 1st Mar. 1941.

LG 35841 27 Dec 1942

Mentioned in despatches, King's New Year List, 1 Jan 43. No citation.

LG 36041 1 Jun 43

Sqn. Ldr. (tempy.) granted the rank of Sqn. Ldr. (war subs.):- G.F. ANDERSON (90110) 1st Mar 43

LG 36092 13 Jul 43

Sqn. Ldr. G.F. ANDERSON (90110) to be Wg. Cdr. (tempy.) 1st Jul 43.

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Wing Commander Gavin Forsyth ANDERSON.

I found a few London Gazette entries. AUXILIARY AIR FORCE RESERVE OF OFFICERS-GENERAL DUTIES BRANCH in all cases.

LG 35114 21 Mar 1941

Flight Lieutenant Gavin Forsyth Anderson (90110) is promoted to the rank of Squadron Leader (temporary) 1st Mar. 1941.

LG 35841 27 Dec 1942

Mentioned in despatches, King's New Year List, 1 Jan 43. No citation.

LG 36041 1 Jun 43

Sqn. Ldr. (tempy.) granted the rank of Sqn. Ldr. (war subs.):- G.F. ANDERSON (90110) 1st Mar 43

LG 36092 13 Jul 43

Sqn. Ldr. G.F. ANDERSON (90110) to be Wg. Cdr. (tempy.) 1st Jul 43.

Thanks, does it meniton awards or what the MID was for?

What does "GENERAL DUTIES BRANCH in all cases" mean?

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The General Duties Branch of the RAF was the aircrew branch; included all commissioned aircrew (officer ranks only); pilots, navigators, bomb aimers etc. There were some non-flying people in the GD Branch, such as Intelligence Officers.

There was no citation for his MiD, he was just listed with several hundred other men.

Regarding 'duty', where he was posted and what units he was with, I suggest you post the question at RAFCOMMANDS forum. This forum is acknolwledged as the best source of info on Commonwealth airforces on the web.

Tell them everything you know about him, include his service number - and I suggest you paste the LG entries I provided in your query to save some duplication of effort-the forum members will appreciate it and it will demonstrate that you have done some digging already.

www.rafcommands.com

Cheers, Ken

Edited by Ken MacLean
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Thanks Ken,

I'll post a message there with hopes of great response.

Wow, quick reply...

600 (City of London)Squadron - F/Lt of said squadron up to 1935, when he relinguished is commission on completion of service.

CHIEF INSTRUCTORS?/OFFICERS? COMMANDING School of Fighter Control 1940-1998

Dec 42 - Apr 44 Wg Cdr G F Anderson

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Interesting. As with most Wikipedia stuff, it requires checking and qualification (for example, the "nations of the British Commonwealth" section!).

Yes it was sewn directly to the uinform if there was no riband to sew it too, that is how it is done out here in Australia, or more accurately, was down. It has now been replaced by the Commendation for Brave Conduct. (Photo from www.itsanhonour.gov.au).

Regards;

Johnsy

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  • 3 months later...

The General Duties Branch of the RAF was the aircrew branch; included all commissioned aircrew (officer ranks only); pilots, navigators, bomb aimers etc. There were some non-flying people in the GD Branch, such as Intelligence Officers.

There was no citation for his MiD, he was just listed with several hundred other men.

Regarding 'duty', where he was posted and what units he was with, I suggest you post the question at RAFCOMMANDS forum. This forum is acknolwledged as the best source of info on Commonwealth airforces on the web.

Tell them everything you know about him, include his service number - and I suggest you paste the LG entries I provided in your query to save some duplication of effort-the forum members will appreciate it and it will demonstrate that you have done some digging already.

www.rafcommands.com

Cheers, Ken

I would just like to add that to be a member of the General Duties Branch, you HAD to be Officer aircrew; if an Intelligence Officer was in the G/D Branch he would have to be still more-or less medically fit for posting to flying duties. Normally if you were no longer fit for flying duties you would be transferred to Administrative & Special Duties (Admin) Branch. There would normally be no provision whatsoever for non-flying officers in thre G/D Branch.

David Duxbury

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I would just like to add that to be a member of the General Duties Branch, you HAD to be Officer aircrew; if an Intelligence Officer was in the G/D Branch he would have to be still more-or less medically fit for posting to flying duties. Normally if you were no longer fit for flying duties you would be transferred to Administrative & Special Duties (Admin) Branch. There would normally be no provision whatsoever for non-flying officers in thre G/D Branch.

David Duxbury

Thanks for sharing your knowledge.

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