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Hello,

I have a WWII German naval officer's dagger, and I would like to know the best way to clean the blade (and scabbard too). It is in very good condition, but I just would like to clean the blade better and know what's best to use so that it doesn't stick (because it's starting to).

Thanks,

Prien

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Don't clean

oil steel to prevent rust, and sticking

if there is rust...

oil can prevent it from spreading

remember you are dealing with something that is plated

wiping with an oily cloth is safest

conservation is what you want to think

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the best oil is personal

gun oil is a good choice

I picked up some silicone oil

from an older copier [fusser assembly]

which I rather like

[its also what they use on gun rags]

whiile many like wd40

it does get gummy over time

there is nothing wrong with sewing machine oil

I understand there is still surpuls comsomline

arround cheap - this was made for storage

some people still like it - it has a special smell

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Hello Prien,

Oil is good but I have found something that you might want to consider. It is called Conservator's Wax. This is a wax that is used in museums, art galleries and by conservators and restorers around the world. Or so the information on the can would have you believe. It also says you can use it on everything from metal to paper, even photos! :speechless1:

That part I find hard to accept. However it works very well on swords and other blades. It is a cleaner/polish wax but it is not harsh in anyway. I wouldn't use it on a pure silver medallion or anything too soft but for blades it works well. If the blade needs a lot of cleaning this is not for you. I got mine from Lee Valley Tools here in Canada but I'm sure it is available everywhere. What I have is made by Conservator's Products Company (Canada) Ltd. Toronto, Ontario Canada M6R 2H9.

I've used this for quite a while and I'm very pleased. Oil, as I have said, is good but it will run down the blade and drip inside the scabbard if stored point down. Oil can also get gummy over time and dust sticks to it. Oh yes, if you ever put an oiled blade on a fine linen dinningroom table cloth it will leave it's lasting mark. Take my word for that. :rolleyes: In all fairness to oil, I would think any coating would have left a mark. Gee I hope my wife reads this post.

If you get the chance give it a try, it's not cheap but a VERY little bit goes a long way.

Cheers :cheers:

Brian

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Hello,

Thanks for the suggestion. I'm sure I could order it from Canada, or find a place here in the U.S. that distributes it. :)

Prien

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Hi Prien,

Any chance of you posting some photos of your dagger? I know I'd like to see it.

Cheers :cheers:

Brian

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Hello,

I know I should have a photo of the blade. It is a WKC blade and has the two large fish at the bottom.

dagger_01.jpg

Prien

Hi Prien,

Very nice dagger indeed. Thanks for sharing.

Cheers :cheers:

Brian

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Hello,

You're welcome. :)

Finding the dagger was the easy part...obtaining the hanger straps was in equal proportion as difficult. I bought them at a gun-militaria show in Allentown, PA.

Prien

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As I'm in the process of finishing with the cleaning of a dirk blade, I wonder which product is better to apply afterwards when I get the item on display: Renaissance Wax or Ballistol?

Renaissance.jpg

Ballistol.jpg

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Hi,

both products are problematic imho.  Renaissance wax is a (micro)crystalline polish. The day may come you want to remove it for some reason, than it will micro scratch the blade. 

Ballistol becomes sticky after a while and will stick to the wooden liner inside the scabbard. 

I would recommend some good gun oil or a silicone based oil. 

Best;

Flyingdutchman

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