Jump to content

Recommended Posts

"Erledigt von NKB 218, 16.IV.17" = finished (destroyed) by N.K.B.218, April 16. 1917

written on a wreck of a French tank. NKB218.jpg

File000er95.jpg

am I right in the assumption that N.K.B.218 stands for Nahkampf-Batterie 218 ?

Any information on this Batterie?

Hardy

Edited by Naxos
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi, Hardy;

I have been looking at the question of German "infantry guns" for a while. There were 50 "Infanterie=Geschuetz Batterien" set up and called that, and they were numbered Nr. 1 to Nr. 50. Later in the war most infantry regiments seemed to have an infantry gun battery attached to them, perhaps one of the I=G=B s, but, more usually, a battery from a field artillery Abteilung, probably from divisional artillery. Additionally, often a field gun battery on the usual deployment and missions was asked to detail one of their four 77 mm field guns to be rolled out of the battery's emplacements and carefully concealed forward, with orders to not undertake a fire mission unless it was an urgent situation, which I think generally meant a serious tank attack. A single well-emplaced and served field gun, unanticipated, could wreak havoc on a tank attack of the era.

I have read a lot of histories lately, including a bunch of the Schlachten des Weltkrieges series, which have a lot of specific detail, and I can not recall the use of the term "Nahkampf Batterie" for field guns in this role. I now routinely take notes when I encounter mention of these guns and their employment, so I would probably remember it. I would think that it was a local designation, possibly for the infantry gun of IR 218 or possibly one assigned to this duty by ID 218.

Bob Lembke

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Found this:

"Die Nahkampf-Batterien Nr. 218 - Nr. 220 wurden ab Januar 1917 aufgestellt und dem Armee-Oberkommando 2 unterstellt. Sie wurden bereits am 23. Mai 1917 wieder aufgel?st."

the above were established from Baden Artillerie units

All in all fifty N.K.B numbering from 200 to 250 were build in Jan 1917

Hardy

Edited by Naxos
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Found this:

"Die Nahkampf-Batterien Nr. 218 - Nr. 220 wurden ab Januar 1917 aufgestellt und dem Armee-Oberkommando 2 unterstellt. Sie wurden bereits am 23. Mai 1917 wieder aufgel?st."

the above were established from Baden Artillerie units

All in all fifty N.K.B numbering from 200 to 250 were build in Jan 1917

Hardy

One learns something every day! So I guess that these were in addition to I=G Nr. 1 thru I=G Nr. 50. As most infantry regiments in the front lines were assigned one or even two "accompanying batteries", and I am sure other close combat batteries were required for other duties, like the anti-tank role. In my recent readings the typical Field=Geschuetze=Abteilung had one of its 2-3 77 mm field gun batteries set on this duty. So in total it is clear that hundreds of infantry gun batteries were required at the end of the war, and the hundred I=G=B and N=K=B were not enough, by far.

The 105 mm light howitzer also could perform this role, and in fact that was the gun that the infantry gun battery of Storm Battallion Rohr finally settled on. (My father was detailed to S=B Rohr several times, and the clearest memory I have of him talking about S=B Rohr was about the effectiveness of this battery in taking out MG nests.)

Bob Lembke

PS: Anyone familiar with the Brit story about the single German officer who manned a 77 mm and supposedly knocked out 17 Brit tanks, and was remarkably mentioned in the British dispatches, and the story that this was actually a fabrication, issued to cover up the supposed fact that the Brits bungled their tank attack, and were fishing for an excuse? Was this Cambrai?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bob, I guess we are learning together here - never heard of N.K.B before I looked closer at what was written on that tank wreck.

Apparently the N.K.B.'s were converted into I.G.B's in the summer of 1917.

Have a look at this very interesting thread: http://www.milex.de/forum/einheitenShow.ht...sageNummer=1306

Regards, Hardy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bob, this is from the Generallandesarchiv Karlsruhe: "Die Infanterie-Gesch?tz-Batterie Nr. 9 wurde ab Juni 1916 aufgestellt und am 10. September dem Sturm-Bataillon Rohr (Armee-Oberkommando 5) unterstellt."

Hardy

Edited by Naxos
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guys,

My information says that N.G.B. 218 (Bayr.) was established by AOK 1 and was disbanded on July 12, 1917. I have examples of both the Nahkampf=Gesch?tz and Infanterie Gesch?tz shoulder straps in my collection. As was the custom when one was transferred or reassigned to a similar unit that wore the same branch shoulder strap, the letters N.G. and the number 241. have been pulled out of the N.G.B. example.

According to the German achives, the N.G.B. originally used Feldkanonen 96 n.A.. At first, the I.G.B. were outfitted with 37mm guns or captured Russian 7,62 cm guns. Later, they were supplied with cut-down 7,7 cm guns. The batteries which were reinstitued in May/June of 1918 were outfitted with Austrian 7,5 cm Skoda mountain guns.

I have some history of the bayr. Infanterie Gesch?tz Batterie Nr.2 from the unit history of the Sturmbataillon 1, to which it was attached. Here are the two guns that are mentioned and pictured in the history. Their original Russian gun and their "new" Infanterie=Gesch?tz L20/17 with caisson, which replaced the Russian guns in the summer of 1917. Here below is the Russian gun and in the next post the L20/17.

Chip

Edited by Chip
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Chip; Thank you for the info

shoulder straps of these units must be very rare since they existed less than six month.

I found the images of the destroyed French tank in a photo album that belonged to a Leutnant of the IR170.

Hardy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Blog Comments

    • As a theology student my professor, a much published former Naval chaplain, set us an essay, saying that if we could answer that successfully we would be guaranteed  a good degree "Which of the gospel writers was the biggest liar, discuss."   I got a good mark, but  don't want to be burned for heresy.   P
    • As my father used to say: "Tain't so much Pappy's a liar - he just remembers big."  
    • Brian: First, let me say that I always enjoy reading your blog and your "spot on" comments.  Another fine topic with such a broad expansion into so many different facets.  I had watched this a week or two ago and when reading your blog, it reminded me of this great quote.   There is a great video on the origins of "Who was Murphy in Murphy's Law"   Anyway, about mid way through this video, there is this great quote and I think it sums it up quite well to your statem
    • I've received word from the Curator that she has permission to re-open this summer.   We're already making plans for a November event at the Museum.   Michael
    • I recall I did the same on hot days at Old Fort York back in 1973-74 - wool uniforms, and at 90F they would let you take your backpack off.   Michael
×
×
  • Create New...