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Crimea & Mutiny medal Reunite


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This is my very first reunite of a Victorian pair.

I was fortunate to be offered an "Indian Mutiny" medal with clasp for "Lucknow" to a Pvt J McDonald of the 79th Highlanders (Cameron Highlanders). By pure fluke two weeks later I found his Crimea Medal with 3 clasps for "Alma, Balaclava and Sebastopol" He was slightly wounded at Sebastopol and I have his records for pay and service during the Indian Mutiny.

A scan of the pair together.

Edited by Mike Huxley
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:jumping::jumping::jumping:

How far apart were they?

Oh, the "adventures" these things we collect have had, over their much longer years than ours! You should write up the story to go along with the pair.

150 years from now, who will be looking at these, and wondering where they were between Then and that future Now?

:cheers:

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:jumping::jumping::jumping:

How far apart were they?

Oh, the "adventures" these things we collect have had, over their much longer years than ours! You should write up the story to go along with the pair.

150 years from now, who will be looking at these, and wondering where they were between Then and that future Now?

:cheers:

Oh Rick they were many miles apart :rolleyes: The Mutiny was bought from a fellow New Englander in Vermont. The Crimea was a pure by luck find 2 weeks after being offered the Mutiny at a Militaria show in Bristol UK.

A little background on the recipient ...

Pvt Jas McDonald McDonald 3200 was a weaver from Auchterarder which is known for Gleneagles but I believe was at one time (many many years ago) known for the manufacture of chainmail.

He enlisted in November 1852.

The next information I have on him is that he was "slightly wounded" at Sebastopol.

He went on to serve with the 79th foot and received the Indian Mutiny medal.

Still more to look up.

Mike

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:Cat-Scratch: Vermont!!!!

I wonder if he emigrated to Canada? Especially up there in NORTHERN Southern canda, as we say hereabouts :rolleyes: "borders" were about as casual then as they are now.

Good point Rick. Many Scots moved to Canada, that could account for both of his medals coming originally from the US. But I still have a vague connection to my own family via this guy.

What the hell, the medals look great together ..the rest of the research will follow as time goes by.

Mike

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Mike,

I was well chuffed with my first reunite a while back, but as mine was from the Great War and I already had the BWM, I consider it to have been a far easier reunite than that of a Victorian soldier's medals.

Well done!

Tony

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Thanks to all for your replies. I'm over the moon at being able to bring this pair back to the homeland :jumping:

Believe me, it was pure fluke that these came together and just goes to show the power of the internet, with me being offered the "Mutiny" from a contact in the USA and me visiting a local medal fair in the UK .... goes to show that it can be done.

As I gather more information I will update you all.

Mike

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Leigh, Geoff,

To be honest this is the greatest BUZZ I've ever felt in my collecting time. My main collecting is to Imperial German, even harder to reunite confirmed pieces together. My sub collecting interest is to the 79th and Cameron Highlanders. This is through a family connection. I intend to search back to find out as much as I can about Jas McDonald.

There is more than a possibility that he is a family member.

Again, thank you all for your imput and any further information on him would be gratefully received.

Mike

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Oh Rick they were many miles apart :rolleyes: The Mutiny was bought from a fellow New Englander in Vermont. The Crimea was a pure by luck find 2 weeks after being offered the Mutiny at a Militaria show in Bristol UK.

A little background on the recipient ...

Pvt Jas McDonald McDonald 3200 was a weaver from Auchterarder which is known for Gleneagles but I believe was at one time (many many years ago) known for the manufacture of chainmail.

He enlisted in November 1852.

The next information I have on him is that he was "slightly wounded" at Sebastopol.

He went on to serve with the 79th foot and received the Indian Mutiny medal.

Still more to look up.

Mike

Hi again Mike, I have read all your posts again and notice that JAs as impressed on the medal rim, you quote his name as Jas, is this his official christian name or an assumption on your part? I have seen a number of victorian medal roles for the Crimea/Baltic conflict and I alway assumed Jas was short for James :blush: is Jas a shortened name for James? It's just an observation :D

:beer:

Best regards

Geoff.

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Hi again Mike, I have read all your posts again and notice that JAs as impressed on the medal rim, you quote his name as Jas, is this his official christian name or an assumption on your part? I have seen a number of victorian medal roles for the Crimea/Baltic conflict and I alway assumed Jas was short for James :blush: is Jas a shortened name for James? It's just an observation :D

:beer:

Best regards

Geoff.

Hi Geoff,

You are right regarding the impression on his "Mutiny" medal is JAs and on the "Crimea" is just J. His official Christian name is James as shown on the WO 12 papers I have for him. I have also seen this on other medals, all seem to be around the late 1800 times and have often wondered why this would change from just the usuall inital to a shortened version of the full christian name.

Well spotted Geoff :unsure:

Cheers,

Mike

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