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Army Commendation Medal....


bigjarofwasps
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Hi Guys,

Can anyone tell me what the ARCOM is issued for?

Can anyone give me any examples of events that lead to ARCOM was awarded?

Is it highly thought of, within the military? One worth having...???

Gordon.

Gordon,

It is basically a "thank you for a job well done" type medal. I don't know about now, but when I was in the army it was often a "going away" medal given to those that were transferring to a new assignment as a reward for all they had done during the years of their current assignment. It was also given for truly outstanding performance on some particular thing like outstanding performance on a particular mission or assignment.

For example, between my two active duty army tours I spent almost 5 years in the Army National Guard. When I left the Guard to go back on active duty for the second time my supervisor asked our commander to nominate me for the ARCOM for my 5 years in the unit. Instead, my commander, who was a very nice guy but not the brightest person I've ever met, wrote the recommendation to cover only what I had done during our last annual training (two weeks active duty). Needless to say, it was downgraded to a Army Achievement Medal (AAM) because the higher ups felt there wasn't enough in the two week period to justify an ARCOM.

I can't really say if it's highly thought of or not. It's a fairly standard award that nearly everyone will get if they stay long enough and do a good job all the time.

Edited by Mike Dwyer
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It seems to be the standard award for being in any kind of sustained combat that results in casualties in Iraq. Read Colby Buzzells' hilarious account of his ARCOM award ("But Sergeant, it says that I served without hesitation or complaint...."), (Sergeant: "Shut up Buzzel and take the damn medal".)

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It seems to be the standard award for being in any kind of sustained combat that results in casualties in Iraq. Read Colby Buzzells' hilarious account of his ARCOM award ("But Sergeant, it says that I served without hesitation or complaint...."), (Sergeant: "Shut up Buzzel and take the damn medal".)

Cheers Ulsterman, I`d forgotten about that one...quality!!!! :cheeky:

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Three Danish officers received Army Commendation Medal

On 28 February 2005 kaptajn Philip Borreschmidt, kaptajn Jesper K. Pedersen og kaptajn Thorsten C. Lossin participated in a convoy to Baghdad with an American officer from the Illinois Army National Guard. An IED (Improvised Explosive Devise) exploded in front of the first vehicle in the column, which resulted in the vehicle rolling over. Two American officers from MND CS (Multinational Division Central Southern Iraq) were seriously wounded in the accident.

On 26 June 2005 the three Danish captains received the American Army Commendation Medal for their professionalism in securing the accident site and participation in evacuating the wounded American officers. Shown receiving the medal are: Kaptajn Philip Borreschmidt, kaptajn Jesper K. Pedersen og kaptajn Thorsten C. Lossin.

http://forsvaret.dk/HOK/Nyt+og+Press...endation+Medal

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These days, it seems the medal is used pretty frequently as an award for allies and friends, where the standard seems to be rather higher than the standards employed for US troops.

http://candle_in_the_dark.blogspot.com/200...01_archive.html

"Better to Deserve Them AND Have Them or Your God Damn Right It's Sour Grapes!

I think the worst part of the Army Awards System is the fact that anyone can put anyone in for an award. In Iraq we all received a "blanket" commendation with the same citation. I was put in for 2 ARCOMs one with "V" and both were kicked back. Most of us in Iraq were turned down for at least one real decoration for actions in combat. The sad part is that this week we had a battalion awards ceremony and about 120 awards were given out. About one third were ARCOMs and for all but about 10 achievement medals were given out.

The point of this bitter rant is that none of these guys did anything in a play-play exercise that we didn't do FOR REAL in combat.

Yes, I am pissed that I wasn't put in for an award, but my squad leader and I come from an older Army where you weren't given an award for doing your job.

I know guys who literally saved a life but weren't put in for an award because it was said that's the medic's job. Yet an E-2 11B gets an AAM for clearing a room well in a play-play exercise.

I know what you're all saying, but when you really look at it if we didn't get decorated in no ###### combat then these kids shouldn't get an award for showing up to the game just because this is an unpopular war and we want to inspire them to stay in.

By the way, it's NOT better to deserve them and not get them."

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In response to a PM from Gordon, I wrote the following. I am NOT an expert on US awards or awards policies, so I throw this out for discussion.

I think it is really messy for the US these days -- in terms of awards as well. Now, more than ever, there seems to be little "system" in the system. There are, for example, massive discrepancies between the ways that the various services make awards (Air Force very freely, the Marines not at all, with the Army and Navy in between). All efforts at standardization and review seem to be blocked by the guys with stars on their shoulders.

In general, if you can generalize, the ArCom is a good boy and "Oh you heard that shots had been fired" award. Not having one is rather like not having an Iron Cross by 1918. The BS is for shots being fired in your general vicinity (I think the blanket award to all who get any infantry/general/medic combat badge still pretty much holds). For allies, an ArCom is like a junior LoM (rank too low) and the BS a combat award. Clearly, the standards seem higher for allies than for US forces, but you would sort of expect that.

The ability to award a combat "V" to both the ArCom and the BS (and, for that matter, to the Air Medal) too just makes it worse. So, there's just being there, and being there and having heard that shots were fired somewhere, and being there and getting shot near, and being there and getting shot at, and really being in combat, and being in combat and doing something brave, and . . . MY BRAIN HURTS!!!!!!!!!! Add to this the dimensions of rank and branch of service and the commander's mood of the moment . . . !!

Add to this the fact that the US has never much liked the idea of giving awards to allies, so it tends to happen outside any realm of conscious policy. BUT, especially in the current mess, the US wants to cherish the fiction that it has allies and friends, . . . !!! Also, the closer you serve to US forces, the more likely to gain anything (but I guess that's obvious).

Does this help at all???? :banger:

For the critique of all . . . ????

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From my experience the ARCOM (without V device) was and is generally awarded for periods of service or achievement. I received several over the years as an award for service in different units as a company grade officer, as this was generally considered the standard award for Captains and senior Lieutenants. I also received one early in my career for achievement during an emergency deployment exercise as the Bn S-1.

Standards vary widely based on the unit, but I recall they were much harder to get in the early 80s than later in my career. Again, my experience was that the number of awards of the ARCOM and AAM were generally higher and standards more liberal in a deployed environment than in garrison.

When I served in Haiti in the mid-90s I had a Bangladeshi Captain work for me and I put him in for an ARCOM at the end of his tour.

Kevin

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Can anyone shine any light of this statement for me?

"While the U.S. Army does routinely review retroactive individual award

recommendations for members of the Armed Forces of the United States, as required by U.S. Federal law and Army policy.My office is still under the impression the British Government does not allow its Soldiers or veterans to receive retroactive foreign awards."

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  • 1 month later...

Here is how I eraned Mine: ARCOM "V"

IRAQ awarded ARCOMw/"V" VALOR

I was awarded the ARCOM with the "V" Device. I take pride in all I do for my country and the Iraqi people. I am very greatful I am back home safe with my family as well. I love the Iraqi people so very much and I am very proud to serve them. I have met so many awesome Iraqi friends while I was in Iraq I miss you my Iraqi Brothers.

On Novemember 30 2003 I was part of an armored escourt to protect the I.C.E Iraqi Currecy Exchange. They were transporting the new Iraqi Currncy in white armored Toyota pickup trucks with a guard on the back with a 50 cal. machine gun. We set up our cordon with M1A1 Abrams Tanks around the Samarra Iraq Bank. I was the gunner on C-34. All was quiet, I picked up a scan, my Tank Commander told me to take my scan to the left. I was scanning in A-66 sector of fire as soon as I terversed to take my sights off his sector an RPG was launched "BOOM" so we all opened fire on the insurgents. The fighting that day lasted for hours. The insurgents used fuel trucks to try to block us in the city while they engaged with small arms fire, RPGs, and mortars from the Golden Mosque. They walked Motars on soldiers standing in the street next to my M1A1 Tank. SGT Stow went down when a mortar hit the road and pices of the mortar and road bounced off and hit him in the head. It crushed his kevlar up and ripped The strapp off the button clean.

This event made news and Geraldo Reveria came out to tell the story to the world on FOX NEWS.

That is how I received the ARCOM with "V"

SPC Brassfield you will never be forgotten miss you my Brother in Arms

Thank you very much for reading my event on November 30, 2003

God Bless

SSG Luna, Lorenzo

Edited by IMHF
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Lorenzo,

In your case, your Commendation was earned and you should be proud to wear it.

In my time in the service, I have met with many Army personnel. Army personnel seem to get Achievement and Commendation medals for things that would get personnel in the Marines and Coast Guard a simple pat on the back and a verbal "job well done". I think that the Army has cheapened the value of their medals because of this.

Another Example, I have seen several Army Lower NCO's with Meritorious Service Medals for helping to facilitate a local drill or exercise!! In the Coast Guard or Marines, I have only seen four enlisted people with this prestigious medal and the lowest ranked member was an E8 at a highly responsible District level!

Regards

Paul

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  • 1 month later...

These days, it seems the medal is used pretty frequently as an award for allies and friends, where the standard seems to be rather higher than the standards employed for US troops.

Seems you are right! ARCOM was conferred to two commanders of the "GROM" Special Forces unit of the Polish Armed Forces: BG Slawomir Petelicki and Col. (today an MG) Roman Polko. As far as I know U.S. generals are not eligible for ARCOM.

Lukasz

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  • 2 weeks later...

It was called "The Green Hornet" (slang) in the late 1940's and 1950's

Bill

Bill

Thank you for the great information on the Green Hornet Army Commendation Medal....

Thank you

God Bless

SSG Luna, Lorenzo

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  • 1 month later...

I know I am a bit late on this thread but here is the awarding critiria for an ARCOM.

The Army Commendation Medal is awarded to any member of the Armed Forces of the United States other than General Officers who, while serving in any capacity with the Army after 6 December 1941, distinguished himself by heroism, meritorious achievement or meritorious service. Award may be made to a member of the Armed Forces of a friendly foreign nation who, after 1 June 1962, distinguishes himself by an act of heroism, extraordinary achievement, or meritorious service which has been of mutual benefit to a friendly nation and the United States.

Awards may be made for acts of valor performed under circumstances described above which are of lesser degree than required for award of the Bronze Star Medal. These acts may involve aerial flight. An award may be made for acts of noncombatant-related heroism which do not meet the requirements for an award of the Soldier?s Medal.

Best,

John

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These days, it seems the medal is used pretty frequently as an award for allies and friends, where the standard seems to be rather higher than the standards employed for US troops.

A mate of mine who is a communications specialist in the RAN attached to a US army unit was awarded this medal. Obviously he wasn't permitted to wear it back here... :rolleyes:

Regards,

Johnsy

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