Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hello Gordon Williamson and the KM forum:

This is my first post and I would like to congratulate those responsible for creating a brilliant website!

I just received my copy of Torpedo Los by Gordon Williamson. What a masterpiece! This is a much needed book for the fascinating history of the U-Boat arm. Thanks Gordon!

My inquiry is regarding the sunglasses, with leather side shields and fabric ear hoops, that one can see U-Boat crew members wearing princibly for look out duties.

Were these sunglasses a KM issue item? So far I haven't seen any mention of the sunglasses in Torpedo Los, although there are photos of men wearing them.

I know that at least one model of these were produced by Carl Zeiss. I have a pair of these sunglasses with their original tin, in my collection. I will post some photos of them later today when I get home.

Many thanks for your attention.

Neil B.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Neil,

Welcome to GMIC and thanks for the kind words, glad you enjoyed the book. I don't think the glasses you refer to were unique to the U-Boats, or even to the Kriegsmarine. These could be used as sunglasses but were also used inside the boat by crews about to go on watch at night, to protect their "night vision" when leaving the (relatively) bright interior of the boat for the open bridge in total darkness.

Unfortunately, space considerations alone prevented inclusion of many more interesdting pieces of kit in the book. Given free reign I could have ended up with 2,000 photos, 800 pages and a book weighing 4 kilos !

Regards

Gordon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welcome to GMIC and thanks for the kind words, glad you enjoyed the book. I don't think the glasses you refer to were unique to the U-Boats, or even to the Kriegsmarine. These could be used as sunglasses but were also used inside the boat by crews about to go on watch at night, to protect their "night vision" when leaving the (relatively) bright interior of the boat for the open bridge in total darkness.

Unfortunately, space considerations alone prevented inclusion of many more interesdting pieces of kit in the book. Given free reign I could have ended up with 2,000 photos, 800 pages and a book weighing 4 kilos !

Regards

Gordon

TIME FOR VOL. TWO !!! :cheers:

Best Regards,

Joe

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for your inputs Gordon, Joe and Michel:

I have uploaded a shot of my Carl Zeiss Jena made sunglasses. Since I started this topic, I scoured my U-Boat books and remembered some good photos of crew members wearing what appears to be the same model sunglasses as the Carl Zeiss model as shown in my picture. The photos appear in Jak M. Showell's excellent book, "Wolfpacks at War" on Pages 12, 13 and on page 62 there is a clear, close up photo and a description of the use of the sunglasses.

Thanks again for your attention and interest!

Regards Neil B.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

Welcome to GMIC and thanks for the kind words, glad you enjoyed the book. I don't think the glasses you refer to were unique to the U-Boats, or even to the Kriegsmarine. These could be used as sunglasses but were also used inside the boat by crews about to go on watch at night, to protect their "night vision" when leaving the (relatively) bright interior of the boat for the open bridge in total darkness.

Unfortunately, space considerations alone prevented inclusion of many more interesdting pieces of kit in the book. Given free reign I could have ended up with 2,000 photos, 800 pages and a book weighing 4 kilos !

Regards

Gordon

TIME FOR VOL. TWO !!! :cheers:

Best Regards,

Joe

Gordon,

I am with Joe and whole heartedly agree "time for vol. 2" !!!!! :jumping:

I am just beginning your book and already realize that there is so much that can be added. Not at all to take anything away from your book as it is. Please don't misunderstand, the book is strong work. Its just that I could be very easily be entertained reading pages about the threads on the bolts alone of the antiquated machines that you know so well. I can only hope to capture this consolated information before its lost overtime.

A big fan, Thank you - Jesse Rocco

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Blog Comments

    • As a theology student my professor, a much published former Naval chaplain, set us an essay, saying that if we could answer that successfully we would be guaranteed  a good degree "Which of the gospel writers was the biggest liar, discuss."   I got a good mark, but  don't want to be burned for heresy.   P
    • As my father used to say: "Tain't so much Pappy's a liar - he just remembers big."  
    • Brian: First, let me say that I always enjoy reading your blog and your "spot on" comments.  Another fine topic with such a broad expansion into so many different facets.  I had watched this a week or two ago and when reading your blog, it reminded me of this great quote.   There is a great video on the origins of "Who was Murphy in Murphy's Law"   Anyway, about mid way through this video, there is this great quote and I think it sums it up quite well to your statem
    • I've received word from the Curator that she has permission to re-open this summer.   We're already making plans for a November event at the Museum.   Michael
    • I recall I did the same on hot days at Old Fort York back in 1973-74 - wool uniforms, and at 90F they would let you take your backpack off.   Michael
×
×
  • Create New...