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Indian GSM, LSGC Pair


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Can anyone provide information on the following man and his two medals IGSM Bars WAZIRISTAN 1919-21, WAZIRISTAN 1921-24 2749 NK.DASONDA SINGH,36 SIKHS, LSGC, 3005 NK.DASONDHA SINGH,4-11 SIKH R. Is it strange that a man with LSGC for 20 years service has only two medals!!

I have never researched Indian recipients and to be honest these are the only two I have in my collection, hope someone out there in this global metropolis can help :D

Photo of medals attached

:beer:

Best regards

Geoff.

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Can anyone provide information on the following man and his two medals IGSM Bars WAZIRISTAN 1919-21, WAZIRISTAN 1921-24 2749 NK.DASONDA SINGH,36 SIKHS, LSGC, 3005 NK.DASONDHA SINGH,4-11 SIKH R. Is it strange that a man with LSGC for 20 years service has only two medals!!

I have never researched Indian recipients and to be honest these are the only two I have in my collection, hope someone out there in this global metropolis can help :D

Photo of medals attached

:beer:

Best regards

Geoff.

Dear Geoff,

What a nice pair of medals the 36th sikhs were raised in 1887 and disbanded in then great axe of 1922 and were merged in to the 11th Sikhs. He would have received his LGSC prior to 1930 when they changed the design of the medal so he would have joined prior to 1910. The regiment was not involved in NW Frontier 1908 campaign nor the Abor Campaign of 1911-12. He may well have been based in India or non-combattive zone in WW1 which means (unlike British troops he would not have received a British War Medal). It is very likely that the pair is his sole entitlement.

Unfortunatley being an NCO it is nigh impossible to do any detailed research, especially as it is quite likely the regimental records may well be in Pakistan, which is inaccessible. Where he a Jemadar of a Subadar (native commissioned ranks) then it would be possible to obtain his war services.

Still I think you ought to be pleased to own such a nice pair to a soldier who gave exemplary service to the King Emperor over many years.

All the best,

Paul

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Paul gives a good overview. As a Naik in the immediate postwar period, he would probably have had wartime service. The 36th went overseas in WWI to China in Oct/Nov 1914, where half the battalion was engaged with the 2nd New South Wales Borderers in the capture of Tsingtao. Then to Mesopotamia to relieve the siege at Kut. Was in the 37th Brigade (Brig. F. J. Fowler) of the 3rd Indian Division (Maj-Gen. H. d'U. Keary). On 12 April 1916, the 3rd Division attacked Beit Aiessa; on the 17th, the main position was taken by the 7th and 9th Brigades.

36th:

5 Apr 1916: 13 BO, 18 IO, 639 OR

16 Apr 1916: 9 BO, 7 IO, 428 OR (33.7% casualties)

The unit suffered major casualties and had to be withdrawn to the lines of communication. After recuperation, to the North Persian Force.

So the group is probably missing a 1914-15 Star trio. LSGCs are in Army Orders in the Gazette of India and finding them is a true nightmare.

Figuring what happened to the records of disbanded regiments is difficult and it is even more difficult to determine what happened to the records of regiments that went to Pakistan in 1947. If the records survive (unlikely, I fear) they'd still be with the (some?) regiment.

A lovely pair, incomplete groups are common for Indian soldiers.

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Thanks for the input guys, I had been on the Sikhs website and gleaned a little of the Regiments history but, as mentioned in my earlier post, I am quiet a novice where Indian awards are concerned and have never attempted, (in all the time of owned them,) any type of research. The GMIC has opened up some new avenues for me with members willing to pass comment and share there knowledge, truley refreshing :D

Many thanks for the info. Paul, Ed you have provided.

:beer:

Best regards

Geoff

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