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In this topic I will show my collection of Soviet Awards, mostly military orders from WWII.

Enjoy,

Всего хорошего,

Auke de Vlieger

The Netherlands

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Close-up of the orders display:

Edited by Ferdinand

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Close-up of the medals display:

Edited by Ferdinand

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Some valor awards: two Military Merit Medals (# 298909 and 2912630) and two Bravery Medals (# 1033454 and 3397744), the first on a bar with a Victory over Germany Medal.

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Four more Bravery Medals: from left to right # 2987056, 3086881, 53677 and 1290486.

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Interestingly, MMM # 298909 and BM # 53677 were originally bestowed on rectangular suspension, but were changed to five-sided suspension after the regulation changes of 19 June 1943. BM # 53677 was probably awarded around July 1942 and is my oldest award. MMM # 298909 is researched and was awarded on 14 February 1943. I'll post the research results later.

Also, BM # 53677 has one of the lowest observed stamped serial numbers as far as I know. Interestingly, the medal also shows repair to the ribbon, probably done by the veteran, and it has a replacement suspension ring.

mmoe3v.jpgmmoe3a.jpg

Edited by Ferdinand

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:love:

So many things to RESEARCH!!!

That is a remarkably early Bravery Medal-- maybe that should be first on your research list. 1942 awards are usually UNDER-decorated by 1944/45 standards and... the way things are going...

who knows how much longer research will be possible?

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I realized that, Rick, so I'm thinking about having all my numbered awards researched. Right now I have the results for ten of my awards, and research is pending for eight more awards, including this BM.

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Here's my Red Banner, probably a May 1945 award. The serial number is 223004. Research is pending - for over a year now...

orbv.jpgorba.jpg

Edited by Ferdinand

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An award I had been looking for for quite some time, an Order of the Patriotic War 1st Class, type 2. The serial number is 88496. Research is pending :D

opo16v.jpg

opo16a.jpg

Edited by Ferdinand

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Three Orders of Glory 3rd Class: from left to right # 223004, 530768 and 603709.

Edited by Ferdinand

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A lot of top notch combat awards. That research should keep you busy for a long time!!

Regards

Paul

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Yep, it definately will, but I love that aspect of collecting Soviet awards :beer: Nothing is as interesting as knowing who the person behind the award was.

Here are the reverses of the Glory's:

Edited by Ferdinand

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Three nice Leningrad Mint Orders of the Patriotic War 2nd Class, type 2 (all concave reverses): from left to right # 281318, 296650 and 411649.

Edited by Ferdinand

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Two Krasnokamsk Mint Flatbacks, # 533651 and 573240, and on the right a Moscow Mint Ring Reverse, # 983897. This Ring Reverse is a very late 2nd Class type 2, produced in 1969, and is only 1800 numbers below the type 2 with the highest number (985700).

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I won't bother you with all the OPW type 3's. Here are two Labor Red Banners, a Short Oval and a Ring Reverse, # 249468 and 475928:

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One of my crown jewels, an Order of Friendship of Peoples with a very high serial number (74267), awarded to Leonid Alekseyevich Kulikov on 23 November 1990:

ovdv1v.jpgovdv1a.jpg

With box and Order Booklet:

ovdv1.jpg

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The order is only 47mm wide, but the eye for detail is simply amazing:

vriendschapgroot.jpg

And a scan of the Order Booklet:

doc20.jpg

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The order is only 47mm wide, but the eye for detail is simply amazing

I agree. This is one of the more beautifully crafted awards. The enameling and the multi piece construction screams pure quality!

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Another beautiful set, an Order of Lenin (# 334428), awarded to Khelena Leonovna Lazdan on 22 Maart 1966:

olen2v.jpgolen2a.jpg

The Order Booklet:

doc22.jpg

doc23.jpg

Unfortunately, both awards (Friendship and Lenin) are unresearchable... :(

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A selection of some of my Red Stars, including some with a screwpost base, MZPP's, etc.

sterren2.jpg

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