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Still, he was a lucky lad. Managed to win the U-Boat War Badge, U-Boat Clasp in Bronze and EK2. His first mission was an extremely dangerous supply mission into the encircled "fortress" of St. Nazaire in November 44.

His second, a patrol off southern Ireland, ended in January 1945 (note the date of award of the U-Boat Badge, just after his second mission).

Particularly interesting, and reinforcing the fact that there was no set criteria for the award of the U-Boat Clasp, he got his in April 1945 after just three missions. Probably his commander recommended him for the award feeling the young fella had done real well in a time when survival rate in operational boats was pretty negligible.

Best thing for him though, he survived the war. The boat surrendered in Trondheim and he spent some time as a POW in the UK.

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Interesting to note that after the war, as a POW in the UK, he was allowed to sit his driving test and passed. British members will recognise the pink slip the driving examiner gives you on the day you pass your test. This slip then had to be shown to the local licensing authority for them to issue the driving licence.

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How amazing that a POW could take his driving test.  Is this an amazing country or what? biggrin.gif

I was chatting to Ian Jewison earlier today and he told me the designation of the unit where the pink slip was issued (GPWW Camp) is German Prisoner of War Working Camp. My guess is they wanted to employ him as a driver so had to put him through his test before he could legally take a truck on the roads in what was by then peacetime Britain. So it was almost certainly because they needed him to drive, not because he wanted it. Interversting nevertheless though.

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  • 3 months later...

I was chatting to Ian Jewison earlier today and he told me the designation of the unit where the pink slip was issued (GPWW Camp) is German Prisoner of War Working Camp. My guess is they wanted to employ him as a driver so had to put him through his test before he could legally take a truck on the roads in what was by then peacetime Britain. So it was almost certainly because they needed him to drive, not because he wanted it. Interversting nevertheless though.

super book

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