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My first court mounting project - Pakistan group


Brian Wolfe
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Hello James,

Firstly, I certainly see your point. The Pakistan Independence medal is definately worn before the British campaign medals/stars (as in the original group) and I have numerous groups in my collection mounted in that order. That said, the vast majority of my groups also contain the Pakistan Republic Medal, at which time (as you rightly state) the new Pakistani awards would take precedence. However, it is not un-common to see Pakistani groups (without the Republic Medal) with the Independence Medal mounted after the British campaign stars/medals and these are usually presumed to be "wrongly" mounted. Maybe they weren't??? Maybe the order of wearing was changed at some point......most probably after 1956, in which case those who weren't still serving would probably have left them in the original order of mounting?

Another point that I have often wondered about is why does the naming on these medals (on the rim) always appear upside down, suggesting that the Royal Cypher was the intended obverse and not the Pakistani flag?

An intersting discussion and food for thought!

Cheers

Rod

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Hi Rod,

I think there could be several reasons why some sets would be mounted with the War medals first. The individual could have died, left the Pakistan forces or emigrated to another Commonwealth country before 1956, or simply been a "loyalist". It is difficult to tell without knowing a little more detail on the individual concerned.

Alas, I am sorry to say that I do not have a definite answer about your second question but your theory could be correct. Perhaps just as with the order of wear, the original obverse may have been the Royal Cypher and that too may have been changed post 1956.

Cheers,

James

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There are a lot of questions about Pakistan and even Indian medals and awards that may never be answered. Unlike researching Canadian and British medals there is just too little information available and the opportunity for the average collector to do first-hand research is even more unlikely. Maybe some day more research material will surface and be made available. I for one can hardly wait.

I have just purchased a second identical group of medals to the one I first posted here that are from the same regiment (R.P.A.) and also to a Niak. They are swing mounted and have the military tailor's label on the back. I bought them because of the similarities and they are also mounted in the same order. There is something about these groups that were earned starting during WW II and British rule, then Indian Independence followed by Partition and Pakistan's Independence. What a piece of history if only they could tell their own stories.

Cheers :cheers:

Brian

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hello Everyone,

As promised here is the group of medals I mentioned purchasing in my last post. They just arrived today. They are not actually "exactly" the same as the group featured earlier in this series of posts, as I mistakenly stated. The first one has the Burma Star while this one has the Africa Star. There has been some discussion on this forum as to the proper order of these medals and I think that has been answered fully. There are many examples available of this same (correct) order on the internet. That is not why I wanted to post this group.

I liked this group first of all because it consists of the WW II British medals, the India Service and the Pakistan Independence Medal, which more or less "goes" with the group I have court mounted. I also liked the fact that this group was prosessionally mounted, note the military tailor's name affixed to the back, and it is swing mounted which contrasts nicely with the court mounted group in my collection. This group is also named to a Naik in the R.P.A. The recipient was,

44023 NK.BARUI KHAN R.P.A.

One of the other differences between this and the earlier group is that only the Pakistan Independence Medal is named, which is what you would normally expect. I have no doubt that this is an authentic group based on the condition of the ribbons and the tailor's name on the back.

I hope you like this group.

Cheers :cheers:

Brian

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The medal combination makes me think that he may have been a member of the 5th Indian Division, which saw service in Africa, then in 1943 returned to India and then Burma. Barhui Khan may have remained in India.

The regimental history is online: http://www.ourstory.info/library/4-ww2/Ball/fireTC.html#TC

Edited by Michael Johnson
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The medal combination makes me think that he may have been a member of the 5th Indian Division, which saw service in Africa, then in 1943 returned to India and then Burma. Barhui Khan may have remained in India.

The regimental history is online: http://www.ourstory.info/library/4-ww2/Ball/fireTC.html#TC

Thanks Michael, I'll check that link out.

Cheers

Brian

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