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Last Turkish WW1 Veteran Passes on to his Eternal Reward.


Kev in Deva
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The late Mr. Yakup Satar.

May He Rest In Peace and his God be Good to Him. / Allah rahmet eylesin.

Yakup Satar (Ottoman Turkish: ﻳﻜﻮﭗ ﺳﺘﺎﺮ, March 11, 1898- April 2, 2008) was, at age 110, believed to be the last Turkish veteran of the First World War.

Born in Crimea, Satar joined the army of the Ottoman Empire in 1915. On February 23, 1917, he was taken prisoner by the British in the Baghdad campaign's Second Battle of Kut.

Satar also served in the forces of Mustafa Kemal Atat?rk in the Turkish War of Independence, which lasted from 1919 to 1922 (it is unclear when he was freed).

Shortly before his 110th birthday, he was treated for a minor infection at a military hospital before being released home, where he lived with his daughter in the Hacı Seyit district of Eskişehir.[

On April 2, 2008 he died aged 110, shortly after his 110th birthday.

More Pictures:

http://fotogaleri.hurriyet.com.tr/GaleriDe...p;p=1&rid=2

Kevin in Deva

Edited by Kev in Deva
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Another link to living history gone.

I got this on "Anzac Day" 1990 from Jeff Floyd-- watched the joint Turkish/Australian memorial services at Gallipoli on television that day. The Turkish veterans then were all in fur caps and officer style uniforms, wearing their Imtiazs, Liakats, War Medals, and Iron Crosses.

This photo came from ebay (in Arizona, of all places) and after posting it online some years ago, I was contacted by the officer's niece, who remembered him in his old age. I sent it back to her:

1st Lt Ibrahim M?nir served in the Republic's army, retiring in 1936. He died in 1957.

At least we preserve their memories while we live.

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I got this on "Anzac Day" 1990 from Jeff Floyd-- watched the joint Turkish/Australian memorial services at Gallipoli on television that day. The Turkish veterans then were all in fur caps and officer style uniforms, wearing their Imtiazs, Liakats, War Medals, and Iron Crosses.

Rick,

Is that a raised inscription in the banner on the reverse of your Imtiyaz medal? And is the reverse of the suspension marked "800"?

Tim

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  • 1 month later...

Tim-- sorry, have not re-visited this thread for so long. Yes, and every single piece is double marked 925 and an Arabic mark, so small I cannot do any better with closeup scans:

Rick,

No hurry. These medals have been around almost 100 years, and I'm going to be around for a few years myself (Inshallah)

The marks are very interesting, but I'm not sure that the second mark is Arabic - not sure what it is, really. I'll have to stare at it for a while and see if it starts to do anything.

Tim

Edited by Tim Tezer
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