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To all:

Some more insight into the reasons behind ever skyrocketing Soviet ODM prices.

Regards,

slava1stclass

Affluent Russians Buying Up Queensland

By Turi Condon

April 14, 2008 04:23am

Russians have become the biggest buyers of residential property on the Gold Coast and the third-biggest buyers in Queensland as their new wealth from oil and mining pushes offshore.

Buyers from the Russian Federation spent $35 million on Gold Coast apartments and houses in 2006-07, or 9 per cent of all foreign investment in Queensland residential property for the year, according to research by real estate agent DTZ.

Overall, offshore buyers ploughed $558 million into Queensland's residential market in 2006-07, an increase of 20 per cent on the previous year, but still a small proportion of the state's residential sales, according to DTZ director of project marketing, Paul Barratt.

Foreign investment in Queensland's residential market has grown 26 per cent a year since 2003 when it was $276 million.

But offshore investment has fallen, with 2003 down on the previous year's $308 million tally. The growth in foreign investment is likely to be checked by the credit crisis, Mr Barratt said.

"More than 1500 Queensland residential property contracts were settled by offshore entities last financial year, not including unconditional contracts in projects currently being sold off the plan or under construction," he said.

"While these figures bode well for continued growth, the impacts of the global credit crunch aren't to be underestimated."

Buyers from Britain dominated Queensland residential sales to offshore investors in 2006-07, spending $112 million or 27 per cent of foreign investment in the state, followed by New Zealanders with $93.6 million or 22 per cent, with Russians coming in third.

Brisbane attracted New Zealanders, while the British were the biggest buyers on the Sunshine Coast; buyers from the South Pacific (New Caledonia) were second to Russian buyers on the Gold Coast.

Russians have also been big spenders with an average investment of $550,000 each compared to Britons and New Zealanders, who each spent $220,000.

A high proportion of the new wealth in Russia has gone into buying boats, helicopters and the like, Mr Barratt noted. It's not surprising that it will also go into the property market, he said.

"Russians have been spending a lot of money everywhere."

On the Gold Coast, Russian buyers have headed to the upmarket enclave of Sovereign Island and have also bought penthouses at Stockland Group's Allisee apartment project on the coast, Mr Barratt said.

While British and New Zealand buyers were the biggest foreign buyers in Queensland, nationals from China, India and the Middle East are expected to push up the rankings in coming years, according to DTZ research analyst Sacha Reid.

Edited by slava1stclass
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To all:

Some more insight into the reasons behind ever skyrocketing Soviet ODM prices.

Regards,

slava1stclass

Affluent Russians Buying Up Queensland

By Turi Condon

April 14, 2008 04:23am

Russians have become the biggest buyers of residential property on the Gold Coast and the third-biggest buyers in Queensland as their new wealth from oil and mining pushes offshore.

Buyers from the Russian Federation spent $35 million on Gold Coast apartments and houses in 2006-07, or 9 per cent of all foreign investment in Queensland residential property for the year, according to research by real estate agent DTZ.

Overall, offshore buyers ploughed $558 million into Queensland's residential market in 2006-07, an increase of 20 per cent on the previous year, but still a small proportion of the state's residential sales, according to DTZ director of project marketing, Paul Barratt.

Foreign investment in Queensland's residential market has grown 26 per cent a year since 2003 when it was $276 million.

But offshore investment has fallen, with 2003 down on the previous year's $308 million tally. The growth in foreign investment is likely to be checked by the credit crisis, Mr Barratt said.

"More than 1500 Queensland residential property contracts were settled by offshore entities last financial year, not including unconditional contracts in projects currently being sold off the plan or under construction," he said.

"While these figures bode well for continued growth, the impacts of the global credit crunch aren't to be underestimated."

Buyers from Britain dominated Queensland residential sales to offshore investors in 2006-07, spending $112 million or 27 per cent of foreign investment in the state, followed by New Zealanders with $93.6 million or 22 per cent, with Russians coming in third.

Brisbane attracted New Zealanders, while the British were the biggest buyers on the Sunshine Coast; buyers from the South Pacific (New Caledonia) were second to Russian buyers on the Gold Coast.

Russians have also been big spenders with an average investment of $550,000 each compared to Britons and New Zealanders, who each spent $220,000.

A high proportion of the new wealth in Russia has gone into buying boats, helicopters and the like, Mr Barratt noted. It's not surprising that it will also go into the property market, he said.

"Russians have been spending a lot of money everywhere."

On the Gold Coast, Russian buyers have headed to the upmarket enclave of Sovereign Island and have also bought penthouses at Stockland Group's Allisee apartment project on the coast, Mr Barratt said.

While British and New Zealand buyers were the biggest foreign buyers in Queensland, nationals from China, India and the Middle East are expected to push up the rankings in coming years, according to DTZ research analyst Sacha Reid.

Dear friend, rather rich people is no more 3-5 % which are at natural resources, and the others of 95 % in the Russian Federation suck the bear paw. :catjava:

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Dear friend, rather rich people is no more 3-5 % which are at natural resources, and the others of 95 % in the Russian Federation suck the bear paw. :catjava:

If I understand correctly, just like other places?

Если я понимаю правильно, точно так же как другие места?

Если я правильно понимаю, как и в других местах?

Trying two online trabnslation sources. Which is better? #1 or #2?

#1 = http://www.online-translator.com/text.asp?lang=en

#2 = http://www.google.com/language_tools

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If I understand correctly, just like other places?

Если я понимаю правильно, точно так же как другие места?

Если я правильно понимаю, как и в других местах?

Trying two online trabnslation sources. Which is better? #1 or #2?

#1 = http://www.online-translator.com/text.asp?lang=en

#2 = http://www.google.com/language_tools

#2 right

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