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Infantry Rifles used in ww1


gumbirsingpun
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Hallo

As many o you know,the Lee-Enfield and German Mauser 98 wir tha main battle rifles o ww1,these rifles wir used by a variety o countries such as germany,england,australia,new zelland. and they were bolt action high powered rifles,but Which o them in yer opinion wis the best?

William Tuna

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I love the bolt on the Enfield, I also find it has a nicer, more solid feel in the hand.

But I think you will seldom find a German who preferes the Enfield over the Maiser or a Brit that prefers the Mauser over an Enfield (I am talking about shooters, not guys who love Mausers because they collect German stuff).

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For the most part the Mauser is a nicely made piece of technology but I think it would need a lot more care in the field than the Enfield. For hunting I would take the Mauser over the Enfield but for the use they were intended I would rather have the Enfield.

Then again perhaps as Chris has stated it could be a matter of nationality in my choice.

Cheers :cheers:

Brian

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While it has been often accepted that the Short Magazine Lee Enfield is inferior to the Mauser System, particularly as regards the strength of the action and accuracy, it is most likely one of the most "soldier proof" rifles ever designed. It was also preferred for it's reliability under the most adverse conditions, as well as it's speed of operation. In 1912, trials conducted at Hythe against the German Service rifle, it was found that about 14 - 15 rounds a minute could be fired from the Mauser, compared with 28 for the SMLE.

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  • 1 month later...

I have four Enfields ( two no. 1s, a no. 4, and a jungle carbine) and five Mausers in my collection, and have fired hundreds of rounds through them.

In my opinion, the Mauser's strengths are its accuracy, smooth action, and light weight. With the Enfield, i would say it has the edge when it comes to ruggedness. Kind of like the M16/M4/AR-15 vs. the Kalashnikov, I suppose.

I would feel comfortable having either, if I were a soldier in WWII.

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Was the Lebel as good as the Enfield or German rifle, it never seems to be mentioned.

I did have a lovely 1916 dated Enfield (old spec deac) with 1915 dated sling but sold it to a mate a while back.

Tony

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