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WW1 German medals ID help needed


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Guest sniffin

Hi,

I posted this message on the omsa.org board, and they directed me here saying this potentially was the place I might be able to learn some more about my elderly cousins fathers medals from WW1 that we just found as we were cleaning out as recently sold family home. Sadly, he can't really remember the history of the medals, what they are or how they were earned, and finding this out for him would really brighten his days.

So, his dad was Baron Wilheim Von Karstedt. I checked this site through google translator and it mentions Von Karstedt as serving in the German airforce 'Field Flyer Department 13' on the Western Front from 1914-1918, and how in August of 1914, he and a fellow soldier 'Becker' both crashed their planes across enemy lines. They managed to survive the crash, evade capture, and made it back to their unit, only to be locked up for 3 days for not having set their planes on fire post-crash, as were their standing orders.

http://www.frontflieger.de/2-ffa013.html

If anyone could provide any info on either the Baron, his unit, or his medals below, it would be greatly appreciated.

The OMSA board has already helped (thanks guys!) in identifying the Prussian 25-year service medal, the Ribbon bar, the the Friedrich Cross, the masonic trowel, and the Hindenburg Cross. I have managed to ID some of the medals through google image search: there's 4 Hannover, named Langensalza 1866 medals, a black wound badge, there's a 'in eiserner zeit ' 1916 coin/medal, a Napoleon St. Helena 1857 medal (with presentation box), 2 1871 Prussian War Medals, a 1902 Bronze Regierungsjubil?umsmedaille medal, a 1914 gold war merit cross, and a 'metz' ribbon set pin.

This one has its original ribbon, I can't make out the initials on the front, on the back the number 7 is in the center of the star and what appears to be 'Degno' is inscribed on the banner above the star.

with original ribbon and pin, "Wilhelm II Deutscher Kaiser on the presentation side, Jahrhundertfeier des Colberg Schen Grenadier-Regiments Garf Gneisenau (2.POMM.) No 9 Stargard 1./P. 1808-1908 on the backside.

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with original ribbon and pin, "Wilhelm II Deutscher Kaiser on the presentation side, Jahrhundertfeier des Colberg Schen Grenadier-Regiments Garf Gneisenau (2.POMM.) No 9 Stargard 1./P. 1808-1908 on the backside.

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This is his 1813 Iron Cross with oak leaves. I matched it up with what I believe is the original ribbon. Is there anything I should be looking for here for further identification...I have no idea...

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and anyone know who this guy might be? it was mixed in with this box. It looks to be a postcard from its backing, is it WW2 or WW1....?

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Thanks again for any replies!

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SNIFFIN,

Wilhelm II Deutscher Kaiser on the presentation side, Jahrhundertfeier des Colberg Schen Grenadier-Regiments Garf Gneisenau (2.POMM.) No 9 Stargard 1./P. 1808-1908 on the backside. This is a medal struck to commemorate 100 years of the regiment. It could have been privately done or by the state.

The EK I is not the 1813 model but the 1914 issue. The 1813 relates to the date the first Iron Cross was instituted by Prussia. The Iron Cross is only reinstitued in Germany in time of war. Hence we have the Iron Cross of 1813, 1870, 1914 and 1939.

The picture is very interesting but of no one I recognize off hand. The collar tabs appear to be for an Arbeitsfuhrer in the Reichsarbeitdienst (RAD).

Regards,

Gordon

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SNIFFIN,

I just looked through some of my reference books and the picture may be that of Oberarbeitsfuhrer Riester. A picture of a person who looks very similar to the man in your picture appears on page 435 of "Labour Organizations of the Third Reich" by J.R. Angolia and David Little john.

Regards,

Gordon

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