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Gold Bars on a wehrmacht soldier ?


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Hi everyone.

Got in a new box of color slides and they show a wehrmacht officer on holidays with his wife in Italy. 1938-1939

When i first saw the slides i thought the man was military police with the gold bars on his neck collar but with the wehrmacht eagle on the jacket, im not so sure?

Can anyone tell me why they are gold as i have never seen this on a normal officers uniform?

Any help would be great.

All the Best.

Ian

goldcollars.jpg

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Interesting picture. My thoughts?? I believe it to be a combination of the age of the slide and the possibility of the sun shining directly on the white bars giving the illusion of them as being gold. Unless, they were custom tailored and against regulation given his rank?

Regards,

Joel

Edited by buellmeister
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Joel. I will post more shots of the same man this evening. But they all show the bars as deep rich gold and the corners of the bars material are ruffled, so im thinking its a custom made job?

I have a lot of color slides of other officers with the standard silver and it looks nothing like these.

Ian

Interesting picture. My thoughts?? I believe it to be a combination of the age of the slide and the possibility of the sun shining directly on the white bars giving the illusion of them as being gold. Unless, they were custom tailored and against regulation given his rank?

Regards,

Joel

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another interesting thing i just noticed, look at the differece in material of the silver infantry boards on his shoulders and the rich tabs on his neck collar.

I think this might be a personnel upgrade that the officer got made?

Ian

Interesting picture. My thoughts?? I believe it to be a combination of the age of the slide and the possibility of the sun shining directly on the white bars giving the illusion of them as being gold. Unless, they were custom tailored and against regulation given his rank?

Regards,

Joel

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Ian,

After futher review, I took a gander in Brian L. Davis', Badges and Insignia of the Third Reich and the collar tabs may be for a Wachtmeister or Oberwachtmeister of the Reich Autobahn Polizei.

Unfortunately, can't decipher the color bordering his Shoulder straps... A shot in the dark...

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Thanks Joel.

I think when i post a few more shots. things will clear up.

But my own opinion, this guy is wearing a standard wehrmact outfit, but his face and how he stands, just tells me, he would have had no problem making his uniform a little more confortable and even a little more interesting.

Until this evening then.

Ian

Ian,

After futher review, I took a gander in Brian L. Davis', Badges and Insignia of the Third Reich and the collar tabs may be for a Wachtmeister or Oberwachtmeister of the Reich Autobahn Polizei.

Unfortunately, can't decipher the color bordering his Shoulder straps... A shot in the dark...

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Hi,

I believe those collar tabs and shoulder boards are absolutely correct. The tabs are for an Army administration official ( Heers Verwaltung ).They were different for each "level" of service. The "level" being the admistrative service army rank equivalent, i.e. a company grade, field grade, generals grade officer, etc. These appear to be a higher level grade with the gold coloring and "wavy" edges.

Regards,

Sam

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No-- those are the far more exciting branch tabs for officers of the OKW or OKH-- much finer rows of tiny bumps like feathers rather than the "seaweed-y" big bumps of senior Beamten--and no edge piping.

I forgot to mention that if the official's NAME is on his box of slides, he can be located in the May 1939 army Beamten Seniority List. :rolleyes:

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