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French 1914 General and Officers Ranks


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I've always wondered if the "KEPI" started life as a "SHAKO" and had the stiffner removed and it converted to a "KEPI," perhaps? Thanks, Boris! cat.gif Sarge Booker of Tujunga

Yes, I think you are rigth, that the kepi is a shako more confortable and easy to use. In the case of the spanish equivalent the "ros" happen somethink like. You can see in those draws.

ros1.jpg

ros2.jpg

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"GREETINGS & SALUTATIONS!" Here is a WW2 black and white photograph of Major General Charles De Gaulle wear the plainer kepi and another French general wearing the fancier kepi. Both are probably veterans of WW1? I wondered if the other general was the same rank or outranked De Gaulle?

Hello

Yes, he was two times wounded in 1914 at Belgium and in 1915 at Mesnil-les-Hurlus and at Douamont in 1916 where was taken prisoner too.It like he was very afortunate. He began the war as lieutenant and I think he finished as captain. About the awards he received I couldn't find any information.

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  • 2 weeks later...

During and after WW1 there were only 7 Mar?chaux and after WW2 only two (Juin & de Lattre de Tassigny) and one posthumeous (Leclerc).

I think you made a small mistake: after WW2 there were 4 maréchaux de france, 1 alive (Juin) and 3 posthumeous (Leclerc, de Lattre and Koenig).

Best regards,

Noir 7

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  • 11 months later...

Boris - Belated congratulations on a magnificent body of work! I chanced upon this and your UK and Austro-Hungarian threads just today. Thanks also to the others such as Veteran who have contributed to the improvement of the information. We all owe you a vote of thanks.

Hugh

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  • 10 years later...

Sorry to revive this old thread but I'm curious:  Was there a 'standard' embroidery pattern for the infantry/cavalry general's kepis?  There seems to my fading eyes to be a lot of subtle variation in the spray of oak leaves, vines and acorns. Was this variation permitted? Was it standardized and did it change from era to era?

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Hello filfoster , there were a standard pattern but only regarding the width of each type of embroidery . and naturally the motif but existed those subtle differences that you observed . dont forget also that the French Army enters in WW1 wearing by the officers including Generals ,two Types of Kepi , the rather small Polo and the called Foulard , the last the preferred by the Generals . If you looks a Generals kepi of the type polo ,the embroidery appears more tight if is possible to say so. on a kepi folulard the embroidery looks more spread ,

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Bayern: Thank you for that! OK, then, there was within the limits of the acorn and oak leaf motif for infantry and cavalry (fighting arms), many variations of the arrangement of the leaves, acorns and vines. Some acorns have only 'caps', not full; some acorns are single, some double, and the leaves may curl upward or downward, all without a precise required pattern. This seems to comport with the photos of the embroidered bands.

Each  single leaf embroidery typically has a 'bright' side and a 'dull' side of embroidery, The dull being perl style, the bright  side is plain gold wire, alternating with the successive leaves on the same level of the band. This is to say, one leaf has the bright embroidery on the upper side, dull below and the next adjacent leaf has dull embroidery upper side, bright below. They are all beautiful!

 

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filfoster ,My pleasure ! Indeed ,the French Generals Kepis of  1914 were all beautifully embroidered ,rich embroidery with two types of thread one the simple golden and the other the so called canetille that was a yellow silk thread with a very thin gold wire coiled over. and these canetille wire was of real gold wire 12 or 14 carat . the simpler thread usually was cotton covered with some form of gilding . normally this is the bright and the canetille the dull . Enfin as the Frenchs use to say , they are niece pieces that costed high in their times but according to some experts today will be very very expensive . Kind regards 

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Filfoster, better to thanks you to open this old threads. I didn,t remember. And thank you too to the member Bayer to keep my side with his doctoral answer. I am sorry but  I don,t have  now the links to the  the web-shops in order to understand better the World of Embroideries, that have a few n ames and models. By example, the embroderies that you find in the brittish cuf of the officials and chiefs have been copy surely from a russian model. In teh french army the golden embrodery feuilles are very similar to de one of the fleet

And tthe cap of the english generals. This is because each symbol have a meaning.. 

 

 

Edited by Boris
todas
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