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There were a fair number of awards struck for the Freedom War. I'll start with my meager collection in the hopes that y'all can add to it ( even if only cyberly :lol: )

First, the Prussian 1813/1814 KDM f?r Frontk?mpfer. Established in December 1813, it also came in 1813, 1814, and 1815 models (added later, obviously). Made from captured cannon and bearing the appropriate Randschrift. There were 2 models: this type, with the sharp arms, and a type for 1813 and 1814 with the arms extending to the rim.

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Hello Tom Y,

An excellent idea for a thread. After all, so much of what was to follow up to 1918 can trace it?s roots back to this era. In your first post, you mention ?...a type for 1813 and 1814 with the arms extending to the rim.?. Here is one for 1813.

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There are cases where multi-year awards were handled in unique ways. For instance, Waldeck used a standard medal and then stamped (or engraved) the appropriate year(s) on it. This means that there is a total of nine single year bars and combinations of year bars. Unfortunately, I can not show one with just 1813 but for illustrative purposes, here is one for the years 1813-1814.

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Another different approach was taken by Baden. Baden issued a standard medal with a bar, or bars, for the appropriate years. Starting with 1805, this system was used through the war 0f 1870-1871, resulting in seventeen different bars. Here is the medal with the bar for 1813.

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another bavarian 1814 plus mini. full size is struck in gold.

Hello Eric:

Thank you for sharing the photographs of your very nice pieces. The miniature is especially nice!

Please note that I believe that the larger (full-size) piece is an issued cross struck from bronze. The piece was gilded and the recessed areas were blackened. Bavarian Officers (and other Officers) often had their crosses gilded (as "luxury" pieces if you will). This way they looked very nice all of the time (didn't develop the lovely green patinae that would stain their uniforms and didn't need to be polished).

I imagine that a gold cross could exist, but it would undoubtedly have to have been cast from an issued piece.

Best regards,

"SPM"

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Lovely awards, especially the Baden medal with "1813" bar, just great. =)

Another different approach was taken by Baden. Baden issued a standard medal with a bar, or bars, for the appropriate years. Starting with 1805, this system was used through the war 0f 1870-1871, resulting in seventeen different bars. Here is the medal with the bar for 1813.

One piece of information to add: the bars to the Baden medal were not handed out until 1866, and now we unterstand why the "1805" to "1815" bars are that rare - given up to 61 years after participation...

:catjava:

PS:

Wild Card, if you ever sell any of the pre "1866" issues, don't hesitate to PM me. ;)

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Thank you Saschaw, I will keep you in mind.

In view of your appreciation of Old Baden and in keeping with our ?1813? theme -

As I indicated in post #12, ?...so much of what was to follow up to 1918 can trace it?s roots back to this era?. For example, the silver medal of Carl Friedrich Military Merit Order of Baden was founded in 1807 and was awarded through 1918. During that time a number of minor and subtle changes took place; but most were virtually unrecognizable. Here is an example from the ?1813? era.

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