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Medal for Committee of teaching technique in Iraq


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Rare medal for Committee of teaching technique (Ministry of Higher Education) in Iraq. This medal issued in the early years of the 1990s, after the II Gulf war.It was issued for the 25th aniversary of the foundation this Committee and it awarded to the professors of the Committee of teaching technique in Iraq.

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Lorenzo

Edited by IMHF
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Outstanding medal! Thanks for posting it! (It would look good on the OMSA site too).

Too bad about the sanctions, but one good thing about the invasion, everyone gets to eat now and far fewer have died than the pro-Sadaamites claimed were killed by the UN sanctions (I remember leftie University Professors stating that 500,000 starved to death).

Sorry Ed-I couldn't resist a jab. :rolleyes:

Edited by Ulsterman
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Outstanding medal! Thanks for posting it! (It would look good on the OMSA site too).

Too bad about the sanctions, but one good thing about the invasion, everyone gets to eat now and far fewer have died than the pro-Sadaamites claimed were killed by the UN sanctions (I remember leftie University Professors howling about 500,000 starved to death).

Sorry Ed-I couldn't resist a jab. :rolleyes:

Actually it was closer to 1.2 million. But this is :off topic: .

Relevant to us is the fact that the quality of Iraqi medals collapsed during this period, reghardless of where they were manufactured. For example, the ugly thick plastic ribbons for the gallantry medal.

Edited by Ed_Haynes
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Yup-

I would suspect that the manufacturers are still around and perhaps the contract records are stuck away in some "1992 paid receipts" file somewhere.

Perhaps Lorenzo will find out who made these.

By the way, Ed did you retire? If so, I have a present for thee.

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Yup-

I would suspect that the manufacturers are still around and perhaps the contract records are stuck away in some "1992 paid receipts" file somewhere.

Perhaps Lorenzo will find out who made these.

By the way, Ed did you retire? If so, I have a present for thee.

The whole question of the preservation of pre-invasion Iraqi records is a very difficult one, and specialiusts in the area have been trying to find out whether any pre-invasion records survive (though the Afghan situation is significantly worse than the Iraqi one). While no straight answers have emerged from the occupation authorities (is this in any way surprising), it seems that most government records were destroyed or looted or merely trashed by the occupation forces (though you might find some among the other Iraqi plunder on e$cam?). We have to remember that the only reason we have extensive and well-organized archives from the Third Reich was the plan to have war crimes trials; there was no such plan for trials in Iraq, just plans for executions. Far beyond our narrow phaleristic interests, this is a tragedy for future scholars attempting to write any history of Iraq in the second half of the 20th century. (Not to discuss the looting of museums and so on.) But, then, invaders and occupiers have never been good friends to history.

Me? Yes, retired. Making the transition to full time research and writing, which is nice, and to a much-reduced income, which isn't nice.

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