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Just received my latest Hard Copy catalogue, (Remember them?) from the "Liverpool Medal Company", some really fine pieces from all over the world.

These two attracted my attention, particularly if money is more plentiful than problems.

the first?

"GCSI Order of the Star of India, Grand Commander Sash Badge, gold magnificantly set with diamonds, breast star, gold and enamel, set with diamonds with original full sash" a snip at 37000GBP

the second?

"CSI Order of the Star of India, breast badge in gold and enamels with diamond set legend complete with gold top buckle" ?5200GBP

and they have more :speechless1:

regards

Alex

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Just received my latest Hard Copy catalogue, (Remember them?) from the "Liverpool Medal Company", some really fine pieces from all over the world.

These two attracted my attention, particularly if money is more plentiful than problems.

the first?

"GCSI Order of the Star of India, Grand Commander Sash Badge, gold magnificantly set with diamonds, breast star, gold and enamel, set with diamonds with original full sash" a snip at 37000GBP

the second?

"CSI Order of the Star of India, breast badge in gold and enamels with diamond set legend complete with gold top buckle" ?5200GBP

and they have more :speechless1:

regards

Alex

Star that comes with it

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No, this is the final, sinlge-class IOM (1945-47 only). Very care.

The IOM ended in 1947. Custody fights between India and Pakistan (as well as constitiutional and history problems).

I can see the similarities and at the same time the differences.

regards

Edited by Alex K
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I've wanted one for decades, but won't ever get one. Too bad.

Hugh

And, when you consider the small number of this variety awarded and their return on promotion within the order, it is even nicer. A shame most have no relieble attributions.

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And, when you consider the small number of this variety awarded and their return on promotion within the order, it is even nicer. A shame most have no relieble attributions.

As you stated Ed, these things were normally returned to the Central Orders Chancery upon the death of the holder if I'm not mistaken, if that's so, how come these "escaped" or are they contemporary Jeweller's copies?

regards

Alex

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As you stated Ed, these things were normally returned to the Central Orders Chancery upon the death of the holder if I'm not mistaken, if that's so, how come these "escaped" or are they contemporary Jeweller's copies?

regards

Alex

Similarly this is up for sale, for 6500GBP, described as early 1820-1830, these should have been returned, Contemporary jeweller's copy?

Alex

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As you stated Ed, these things were normally returned to the Central Orders Chancery upon the death of the holder if I'm not mistaken, if that's so, how come these "escaped" or are they contemporary Jeweller's copies?

regards

Alex

If awarded to an Indian royal (or their extended family), the families were allowed to purchase the badge at cost. It is not clear whether this policy was ever explained to London.

Likewise, anyone who still had the breast badge in 1917 was supposed to have the badge converted or could purchase (at cost) a new neck badge (and this neck badge would the one that would be returned).

When the CSI was created (along with the KCSI) in 1866 (five years after the order had been creasted as a single-class "great order" along the lines of the Garter, Thistle, or St. Patrick), it was limited to just 100 members at any time, half Indians and half Euroipeans (and half those Europeans had to be reasiding in England, so the order would have some "home visibility"). While these numbers would expand modestly over time (to 225 total by 1939 when the war meant that issues like this would be ignored and awards would be relaxed -- the flood gates would open -- for the war years, there could be 10 civil CSIs per year and 2 military awards), the clear intent was for this to remain an exclusive order (with the CIE added as a less exclusive single-class low order in 1877 and sprouting the higher classes in 1886 and 1887).

After independence, the High Commission gave up on the policy of retrieving awards to Indian recipients on their deaths, while they continued to retrieve (and destroy) awards to Europeans.

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Similarly this is up for sale, for 6500GBP, described as early 1820-1830, these should have been returned, Contemporary jeweller's copy?

Alex

In this period, I think, the tinsel star would still be the normal award and you could have a metal star made (which, of course, your family would not need to return).

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  • 5 weeks later...

I've got to be careful what I say, but I believe the CSI was purchased with what was purported to be the medals of a Lt-Col following a local auction. The group, also with CBE, was broken and failed to sell. I knew the CSI was a bargain at the price, and told the auctioneers to sell separately, but the seller wanted to sell as one lot to keep the medals together. The 'group' was offered to me at ?3500 but I declined. The medal to the man who was Later Lt-Col was listed in the same catelogue, so a case of instant profit for the medal dealer. I bought another group, to a Gurkha, who was purportedly his batman.

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